Tag Archives: Sea life

Amusing Monday: Images from the deep sea

The fish below is known as a fangtooth, a tropical fish found in the ocean up to 16,000 feet deep. Upon second glance, you will see a human eye and a chin and realize that you are looking at a very nice painting on a human head.

Anoplogaster cornuta, Fangtooth. Make up by Helena Jordana Skuhrovcov, Prague, Czech Republic. Photograph: Helena Dufková Photo courtesy of Bloom Association/LUSH
Anoplogaster cornuta, Fangtooth. Make up by Helena Jordana Skuhrovcov, Prague, Czech Republic. Photograph: Helena Dufková // Photo courtesy of Bloom Association/LUSH

The artist is Helena Jordana Skuhrovcov of the Czech Republic. She is one of several body painters who have joined the protest against deep-sea bottom trawling in Europe, a campaign sponsored by LUSH cosmetics and Bloom Association, a marine conservation group.

Each of the artists involved in the project has painted a different deep-sea creature to raise awareness about life in the deep ocean and to call upon European governments to ban deep-sea bottom trawling.

States a press release from the two organizations:

“The deep ocean is the largest habitat on the planet – teeming with all kinds of unique marine life including corals and sponges that live for hundreds to thousands of years. But deep-sea bottom trawlers are destroying them, dragging giant weighted nets, cables and steel plates more than 2 tonnes each across the ocean floor to catch a small number of low value fish…

“A successful ban would represent a momentous historical milestone in the fight to protect our deep ocean from unnecessary destruction. Deep-sea bottom trawling is a capital-intensive, fuel-greedy, subsidy-dependent fishing method that fails to yield positive economic results while destroying the natural habitat of European seas.”

Paragorgia, Bubblegum Coral. Make up by Maeva Coree, Paris, France. Photograph: Alexandre Faraci Photo courtesy of Bloom Assocation/LUSH
Paragorgia, Bubblegum Coral. Make up by Maeva Coree, Paris, France. Photograph: Alexandre Faraci // Photo courtesy of Bloom Assocation/LUSH

The Bloom Association’s website contains a gallery of 16 of these body paintings of deep sea creatures, although The Guardian’s gallery of the same paintings seems a little easier to navigate.

The video below shows some of the artists painting their models during a tour of Europe earlier this month. It drives home the theme of the anti-trawling campaign, which has been joined by numerous celebrities, as shown in a “gallery of support.”

Thanks to Fred Felleman for calling my attention to this interesting artwork. And, no, I’m not confused about the day of the week; I just had too much going on yesterday to focus on “Amusing Monday.”

Geoduck companion appears on ‘Prairie’

Garrison Keillor

Earlier this month, Garrison Keillor and his live variety show, The Prairie Home Companion, performed at the Paramount Theater in Seattle. He actually conducted two shows, the first on March 27, the second on April 3.

As Keillor generally does when he travels throughout the country, he visits with local people and fills the discussions with references to local places, events and folklore.

“If dry socks and dry underwear are very important to you, this may be the wrong place for you to move to,” he quips during his second show.

I bring this up to call attention to a segment in which Keillor calls to the stage Jeff Adams of Washington Sea Grant and author of the blog “Sea Life” on the Kitsap Sun website.

You’ll find Jeff’s segment at 81:58 in the player at right.

Keillor was impressed that Jeff was an opera singer, which is something I did not know. But that’s a story for another time, Keillor says. Adams was there to talk about our local sea life, and the naturalist begins by telling the prairie visitor about our whales.

Jeff Adams

Jeff mentions the recent visits by the seal-eating transient orcas, which have been intimidating the migrating gray whales, according to recent observations. (See Water Ways March 30 and April 12.)

“I’m not going to take my child to see an orca whale bite the head off a seal,” Keillor says in a shocked tone. “That would scar her for life. Do you have more peaceable animals around here?”

“We do, we do,” Jeff says, pulling out a live geoduck.

“He’s naked!” says Keillor, recoiling, “… and he’s outgrown his shell by about 9 inches! … I’ve never seen anything like it, and I’m not sure I want to eat it, so you’re on your own.”

Adams also talks about our giant Pacific octopus and tells Keillor that there are plenty of places to hike around here.

In writing about the experience in his blog, Jeff said he was a bit intimidated before he went on:

“It was a fabulous feeling and an honor. I have to admit though… I couldn’t help but be a bit nervous. In the past, my musical alter-ego has been on stages big and small, singing everything from country to opera. This was different. I was going to be talking about something I loved, both personally and professionally, with a master of wit and improvisation… with no real preparation. Eek!”

But watching how the show was handled before he went on put Jeff somewhat at ease. I believe that Adams did an admirable job of demonstrating his passion and bringing a slice of our local water life to a national audience.

Jeff Adams displays a geoduck clam for Garrison Keillor and the audience at Seattle's Paramount Theater.
Photo courtesy of The Prairie Home Companion