Tag Archives: Just for Laughs

Amusing Monday: “Just for Laughs: Gags” seen in more than 100 countries

Whether you think “Just for Laughs: Gags” is hilarious or inane, the hidden-camera pranks have been viewed in more than 100 countries around the world. They are even shown on airline flights between countries.

Since nobody talks in the videos, no translation is needed. At the beginning of each video segment, actors show the viewers what they plan to do to their unsuspecting victims. At the end, the pranksters introduce themselves, and the cameras are revealed.

The “Just for Laughs: Gags” webpage on YouTube contains an estimated 2,000 videos showing practical jokes of all kinds, mostly performed on city streets. (I gave up counting the number of videos about halfway through, and it would be near-impossible to figure out the number of page views.) For this blog post, I’ve chosen four water-related bits.

The original “Just for Laughs” is the name given to a comedy festival held each year in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Founded in 1983 by Canadian Gilbert Rozon, it is the largest and most important comedy show in the world, according to a 2007 story in The Guardian. (For more history, see Wikipedia.)

“Just for Laughs: Gags” borrowed the familiar name in 2000, when producers launched a new television prank show based on “Candid Camera.” It was shown first on the French Canadian television network Channel D and was later picked up by networks based in the United Kingdom, France, the U.S. and about 30 other countries. (Wikipedia)

For my taste, a few of these videos at a time is enough, but they are so ubiquitous on YouTube that you are likely to run into them at any time. Be careful or you will find yourself going down a rabbit hole and coming back with a few hours missing from your life.

Some people are perplexed that anyone would enjoy these videos. Keyan Gray Tomaselli, a South African communication professor, author and media critic, called the series “inane” in his book about cultural tourism after he watched some segments on a commercial flight. He also noted in his book that his comment elicited an apology from a Canadian friend of his.

But other people have praised the universal appeal of this type of humor, which harkens back to the days of silent films and slapstick comedy.

Major Ray Wiss, a Canadian soldier who wrote about his two tours in Afghanistan, said building a relationship with Afghan soldiers took more than just eating and playing cards with them. Television really broke the ice, he said, noting that “for pure social connection” there was nothing like “JFL: Gags.”

“The Afghans got the jokes and laughed as hard as I did,” Wiss wrote. “Yes, these people are different from us. But they are far less different than many would believe.” See the excerpt from “A Line in the Sand: Canadians at War in Kandahar.”

Amusing Monday: Water pranks for April Fool’s Day

We used to call them “practical jokes.” My wife’s family has a long tradition of pulling tricks on people — a tradition that has made me the victim too many times to count, a tradition that now has caught on with our grandchildren.

Hydrant

Through the years, television has captured the reactions of many prank victims, beginning with “Candid Camera,” a show that dates back to the earliest days of television. At least 10 TV shows have been based on tricking people, according to Maccorley Mathieu of Star Pulse, who listed his “Top 10” prank shows for April Fool’s Day in 2010.

One of the tickster shows is the ongoing Canadian production “Just for Laughs” and its later version involving children, called “Kidding Around.” In honor of April Fool’s Day, I’ve borrowed a few water-related videos from this program to amuse you today. If that’s not enough, check out the YouTube pages where you will find these:

Fire Hydrant Explosion Gag

Wet and Dry Twins

Laptop Water Damage

Fresh Squeezed Orange Juice

Crazy Watermelon Spray

Shark Attack!