Tag Archives: Duck

Amusing Monday: Duck paintings help support wetland conservation

Artists possess the creative power to portray a simple bird — say a male mallard duck — in a multitude of ways, something I never really appreciated until I reviewed hundreds of duck portraits in the Federal Duck Stamp Contest.

The acrylic painting of mallard ducks by Bob Hautman of Delano, Minn., took first place in the Federal Duck Stamp Contest. // Photo: USFWS

Judges in the annual contest seem to prefer a super-realistic style. Each year, the winning entry is used to create a federal duck stamp, which are the stamps that waterfowl hunters must carry while hunting. They are also purchased by many people who care about conservation.

Details in the duck portraits are important, but it is also interesting to observe the landscapes that the artists place in the backgrounds and foregrounds of their pictures. Take a look at the Flickr page where 215 entries are shown in the latest contest sponsored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Eligible species for this year’s contest were the mallard, gadwall, cinnamon teal, blue-winged teal and harlequin duck.

The acrylic painting of a cinnamon teal by Greg Alexander of Ashland, Wis., took second place in the Federal Duck Stamp Contest. // Photo: USFWS

The winning entry for this year’s duck stamp was submitted by Bob Hautman of Delano, Minn., whose acrylic painting shows a pair of mallards in flight. This is Bob’s third winning entry, after two previous paintings were turned into stamps in 1997 and 2001.

Hautman comes from an artist family. His brothers, Jim and Joe, have each won the same contest five times.

“Congratulations to Bob Hautman on his win today,” said Greg Sheehan, deputy director of the Fish and Wildlife Service when the winners were announced last fall. “He is part of a collection of talented wildlife artists whose work has helped conserve habitat not just for waterfowl, but for a vast diversity of wildlife.”

The oil painting of a blue-winged teal by Christine Clayton of Sidney, Ohio, took third place in the Federal Duck Stamp Contest. // Photo: USFWS

The Federal Duck Stamp, which will go on sale later this month, sells for $25. Proceeds, which total about $40 million a year, go for protecting wetland habitats in national wildlife refuges across the country.

Second place was an acrylic painting of a cinnamon teal by Greg Alexander of Ashland, Wis., and third place was an oil painting of a blue-winged teal by Christine Clayton of Sidney, Ohio.

By the way, Christine was the third-place winner of the National Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest in 2000, when at age 17 she entered a painting of a northern pintail.

The acrylic painting of an emperor goose by Rayen Kang of Johns Creek, Ga., took first place in the Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest. // Photo: USFWS

The winner of this year’s junior contest is Rayen Kang of Johns Creek, Ga., who submitted an acrylic painting of an emperor goose. Second place went to Daniel Billings, 17, of Gallatin, Mo., who painted a redhead in oil. Third place went to Larissa Weber, 17, of Anderson, Ind., who painted trumpeter swans in acrylic.

The Federal Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program encourages students from kindergarten through high school to explore their natural world, learning about biology and wildlife management. A $5 Junior Duck Stamp is purchased by collectors, with revenue going to support environmental education.

Amusing Monday: You can’t duck away from these cute stories

For 13 years, a mother duck has been hatching her eggs in a school courtyard, then waddling through the school hallways to get beyond the building and into a nearby pond, as you can see in the first video, featured on Good Morning America.

“It’s so unusual, but everyone gets so invested in this duck, because how cool is it that she comes back each and every year,” local resident Elizabeth Krause told reporter Abby Welsh of the Livingston Daily in Livingston County, Mich., where Village Elementary School is located.

It seems to me that the most remarkable thing about this story is the duck’s choice of a nesting site. Each year, the duck flies into the courtyard and lays her eggs amidst a large group of active school children. It seems the duck has learned that her nest is relatively safe from outside predators, so she returns again and again.

“Everyone knows about the duck because even maintenance (staff) will go, ‘Can we cut the grass in the courtyard yet, or is the duck there?’” said principal William Cain. “I told them, ‘No, you have to wait until the duck is out of there.’”

I thought this duck journey was a one-of-a-kind event until I realized that I had been looking at videos from two different schools. Both videos were shot this past spring. The second school, Glover Elementary in Milton, Mass., involves the students, who quietly form a parade route to watch the ducks go by. Reporter Mina Corpuz tells the story for the Boston Globe.

The second video on this page is a clever three-minute version, accompanied by music, at Glover Elementary School, showing the ducks all along the parade route. The video was produced by Bill Driscoll, nephew of the school nurse. Shorter, more newsy video stories were offered by Inside Edition as well as CNN.com.

I never realized that so many cute duck stories existed until I began reviewing dozens of videos for this Amusing Monday feature. One story that was especially well done was by Steve Harman of CBS Evening News called “Duck pals: A girl and her duck” (third video on this page). There is an unrelated story by Inside Edition about a boy and his duck.

If you enjoy cute duck stories, you can’t miss this incredible story called “The cat and the ducklings” (video below).

Amusing Monday: From pets to cartoons, ducks are unique characters

In the early days of “Amusing Monday,” I featured a lot of water-related animals. Somehow I never got around to tossing together a potpourri of duck-related videos and activities.

Geoducks, yes, but not the kind of duck that swims on water and waddles on land.

I need to begin this blog post with a compilation video of Mihai Francu’s pet duck, captured over time as the little duckling grows up. Mihai, a Cyprus-based photographer, has compiled a nice collection of short videos, which can be viewed on his YouTube Channel. First, take a look at the top video on this page.

Duck jokes, anyone, as old and musty as these seem to be?

Q: What do you call two ducks and a cow?
A: Quackers and milk

Q: What do you call it when it rains chickens and ducks?
A: Fowl weather

Q: What did the duck carry his schoolbooks in?
A: His quackpack.

Q: Why did the duck fly south for the winter?
A: Because it was too far to walk.

Q: What happens when a duck flies upside down?
A: He quacks up.

Q: Which bird refused to keep his eyes closed?
A: The Peking duck.

Customer: How much is that duck?
Shopkeeper: Ten dollars.
Customer: Okay, could you please send me the bill?
Shopkeeper: I’m sorry, but you’ll have to take the whole bird.

Q: What do you call a cat that swallows a duck?
A: A duck-filled-fatty-puss

Q: How do you get down off a horse?
A: You don’t get down off a horse. You get down off a duck.

Duck talk: Two ducks were sitting on a pond. One went “Quack quack!” The other replied, “That’s funny. I was just about to say that!”

Remember the 1984 Ninendo video game called “Duck Hunt”? Teenagers today were not even born when this game came out, so it was fun to see their reaction in a video by REACT, the first video in the three below. The next two videos are parodies of the original game.

Two years ago in “Water Ways,” I revealed that Daffy Duck was my favorite cartoon character, and I featured a video showing the evolution of Daffy over time. It was by WatchMojo.com. In August, WatchMojo came out with a new video pitting the personal and comedy styles of Daffy Duck against those of Donald Duck. You’ll find this video in the second player on this page.

On a more artistic front, students from across the country have been producing beautiful duck portraits for the past 22 years. In March, “Water Ways” featured the best entries from the annual Federal Junior Duck Stamp Contest.;

Finally, for children as well as the rest of us, you one can find numerous videos to illustrate the numbers-learning song “Five Little Ducks.” One of the best on the web is the video below by Chu Chu TV.

Muscovy ducks as criminals? Not an open/shut case

I’ll admit that before this week I had never heard of a Muscovy duck, but I quickly learned that these waterfowl are both loved and hated, depending on where you live in the United States.

A muscovy duck at Pheasant Fields Farm in Central Kitsap
Kitsap Sun photo by Meeghan M. Reid

In our area around Puget Sound, people generally like them, as I describe in a story in today’s Kitsap Sun. And that’s why people contacted me, concerned that they would be forced to give up their prized birds as the result of federal rules that went into effect this week.

In Florida, many people hate the birds, as you may note in this March 14 story by Drew Harwell of the St. Petersburg Times.

I began talking to people on all sides of the issue and came to realize that this bird is interesting and cannot be judged as either a criminal or a saint.

Officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had heard mostly from people who hate them and called them a nuisance. I guess Southern states have a serious problem with the Muscovies which can take over urban and suburban lakes and create a problem in parks, not to mention private homes on the water. Consequently, many people were pleased when the agency proposed a regulation to restrict propagation of the bird.

Federal officials apparently failed to account for folks who keep them as pets, enter them in poultry shows, grow them for their meat and eggs, and somehow find them quite lovable. The backlash from Muscovy duck lovers was sudden and unexpected.

What topped off this story for me was when federal officials practically said, “Well, never mind,” after the rule was final. While they continue to insist that the birds should not be released from captivity, they intend to go back through a public comment period to revise the rule. In the meantime, they have made the unprecedented announcement that most provisions of the rule will not be implemented.

In addition to my story in today’s Kitsap Sun and the one in the St. Petersburg Times, you may wish to read a little more about these controversial animals:

Wikipedia does a nice job of covering the basics.

Standards of Perfection for Muscovies are provided by the American Poultry Association.

Muscovy Duck Central allows people to share their passions for Muscovies.

Avian Web provides much info about the Muscovies.

Commercial care practices are provided by the University of California at Davis.