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3 thoughts on “Low rainfall during November contributes to smaller salmon runs

  1. I understand the idea of having water years, sort of, in order to have a standard way to compare long-term trends. However, when illustrating a comparison of current (short term) rain levels with historic levels, why have graphs in which less than 25% of the chart has current data relevant to the discussion, and over 70% of the chart not only has no current data, but causes the scale of the current data to be so small that it is difficult to make out what the message is. It’s not like it’s difficult to get a spreadsheet to generate a custom plot!

    1. I like these graphs, produced by Kitsap Public Utilities District, because they show not only the current water year but also last year, the average and the highest and lowest water years. If you zoom in by clicking on the graph, you can see where we stand with respect to the lowest water year on record, even though we are early in the year. I’ve added links in the text for those who wish to delve further into the data.

  2. No Coho in Naylors Creek, a tributary of Chimacum Creek in Jefferson County, this year either. A decade ago runs were so heavy it was possible to walk up the stream on my property and step on a dead Coho with every step. Low fall rainfall and downstream beaver dams apparently are the reason there are no fish making it up this far.

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