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2 thoughts on “Yearlong pumping test will help define aquifers across Kitsap Peninsula

  1. I’m sure I’m coming to this conversation late….but how odd this all sounds. How can it be that a water district decides to do a yearlong drawdown test on an interconnected aquifer system that might give them results they need for a test but could negatively affect homeowners throughout Central Kitsap who have their own wells? Granted, they are already drawing water from their well, but to intentionally draw extra water to complete this test makes little sense. Why don’t they put the extra water back into the aquifer that benefits us all? What happens when the wells in Seabeck, let’s say, run dry due to this drawdown test? I read this today in the Sun…may have missed other stories but I think this sounds like a bigger issue than it’s being made out to be.

    1. Most private wells are not nearly as deep as the well being pumped. They are essentially in separate aquifers, so the effect is expected to be minimal. I understand that wells at all depths are being monitored to see how much, if any, effect is seen. No problems are expected from this temporary drawdown, but the whole experiment could be called off if problems arise.

      In case there is any confusion, the water is all being put to use in households and businesses in the region. Other wells in the Silverdale water system have been turned off during the test. If there is excess water from the pumping at any time, it can be directed into a system operated by Kitsap Public Utility District.

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