E-Mail 'Impassioned task force faces the challenge of saving endangered orcas' To A Friend

Email a copy of 'Impassioned task force faces the challenge of saving endangered orcas' to a friend

* Required Field






Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 5 entries.



Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 5 entries.


E-Mail Image Verification

Loading ... Loading ...

4 thoughts on “Impassioned task force faces the challenge of saving endangered orcas

    1. Denise,
      Thank you for your comment. I’ve heard about seeding the oceans with iron for many years. As a result of your comment, I decided to see if I could find any new studies. The latest I could find that looks at all sides of the issue is an article in the May 23, 2017, edition of Nature. I also located some interesting findings in a March 3, 2016, report in Phys.Org.

      Results of experiments so far seem to be ambiguous, and everyone involved seems to be clamoring for more laboratory or limited-scale studies.

  1. i have long heard that the SRKWs were the most toxin loaded mammals – I guess from accumulating it up the food chain.

    But what about the transients that are here so much, or the grays and humpbacks. Or local seals and sea lions. Are they all toxin loaded too?

    1. Peter,

      I’ve been looking for a report that lists the toxic loads for a variety of marine mammals. No luck so far. I can tell you what I have heard from various researchers.

      In general, transient killer whales have higher toxic loads than resident killer whales. That’s because they eat seals and sea lions, which are higher in the food web than fish, which residents eat.

      Resident killer whales and harbor seals both eat fish, but residents generally live longer, so chemicals accumulate longer in their bodies. Seals often eat smaller fish than resident killer whales, so I would think that a 5-year-old killer whale would have a greater toxic load than a 5-year-old seal.

      Research has shown that gray and humpback whales have picked up contaminants. I would think that their concentrations would be lower than killer whales or pinnipeds.

      If anyone would like to share some specific numbers, feel free to chime in.

Comments are closed.