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3 thoughts on “New bridges provide improved habitat in two Kitsap County creeks

  1. When the county hires contractors to build any new bridges, then I hope they can find one that can complete the job quicker than the time it took for the bridge near Kingston. Near Surprise, Az., it took contractors 11 months to build a 4 lane bridge over a 4 lane, and one 4 lane road was never closed.

  2. Any idea of the pre-bridge salmon species populations in these two streams? Of course the answer is no. There is no basis to know whether salmon populations will improve or remain the same.
    Steelhead like cold, fast moving water. Near zero possibility the new bridges will help with steelhead because it’s not the water conditions for steelhead.
    Chinook? Unlikely. Coho? Maybe. Chum? Likely with the larger estuary, but more chum salmon may make some for fall viewing, but they aren’t going to help solve the ever decreasing sport or commercial markable salmon.
    These are more feel good projects than salmon restoration efforts … but there are some road safety improvement benefits, and it provides local jobs.

    1. Robert,

      The Carpenter Creek bridge project has multiple benefits beyond fixing the problem of high flows through a five-foot culvert. As Joleen Palmer points out in this blog post, the expansion of the salt marsh will improve conditions for multiple species, including increased prey and refuge for juvenile salmon.

      I described the importance of this type of habitat in Part 2 of a series regarding the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project. Check out the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound.

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