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2 thoughts on “Plans coming together for recycling wastewater from town of Kingston

  1. “Another major benefit of the project will be the elimination of 42 million gallons of sewage effluent per year — including about 3,000 pounds of nitrogen — which gets dumped into Kingston’s Appletree Cove.”

    Eliminating sewage effluent being pumped 24/7/365 into Puget Sound is the headline … it’s not just nitrogen, but multiple dozens of untreated chemicals and micro plastics in everything that goes down a toilet, sink, and shower.

    Ecology’s idea that sewage water pollution by dilution is OK for the Puget Sound needs to be scientifically studied to see if the millions of gallons of limited sewage treatment waters that flow into Puget Sound every day are environmentally benign, or if the chemicals and micro plastics are having a cumulative detrimental environment effect.

    1. A good deal of work is underway regarding all sorts of pollutants going into Puget Sound, especially estrogen-disrupting compounds. More work is needed to make sure that any chemicals getting into Grover’s Creek are safe for salmon and other fish.

      The 2010 Golder report (PDF 18.2 mb) says this on page 30:

      “Although salmon species at the Grovers Creek Hatchery appear to be at minimal risk of endocrine disruption from the proposed reclaimed water, resident or transient fish in Grovers Creek immediately downstream from the tributary receiving reclaimed water may be exposed to EDCs at concentrations associated with some risk of estrogenic effects. Salmonid population modeling in conjunction with bioassays focused on reproductive success would assist Kitsap County in evaluating potential effects of the proposed reclaimed water project.”

      Data are available in Appendix C of the report.

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