E-Mail 'Green crabs go wild near Sequim, but experts say control is still possible' To A Friend

Email a copy of 'Green crabs go wild near Sequim, but experts say control is still possible' to a friend

* Required Field






Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 5 entries.



Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 5 entries.


E-Mail Image Verification

Loading ... Loading ...

3 thoughts on “Green crabs go wild near Sequim, but experts say control is still possible

  1. Supposedly they are good to eat. Make it open season year round so people will want to go get them. Humans seem to have a way with making a species extinct; let’s do that here!

  2. Green Crab have been in Willapa Bay since 1965. See Between Pacific Tides , Calvin, Ricketts and Dr. Joel Hedgepeth of OSU who observed them there on many occasions. They have been here more than 65 years.
    They were introduced to Elkhorn Slough by Ed Ricketts for Pacific Biological Supply and Carolina Biological Supply as dissection specimins for HS biology classes. I dissected one at Woodbury HS in Advanced Biology in 1960.
    They were also frequently sent to and dumped on the West Coast along with East Coast Marine Algae species with “Authentic Maine Clambakes”(including live East Coast Lobsters(Homarus americanus) for “color and authenticity”
    Arriving overnight by FeDeX and UPS from Portland ME. Through out the 1970’s and 1980’s. I last saw a shippment to Willapa Bay on a FeDeX delivery truck in May if 1986 when it picked up a out going delivery from my clam and oyster farm in Shelton WA, Little Skookum Shellfish Growers.
    This all is in the open literature. Sorry.

    1. Peter, Thanks for writing. It appears you have some important information on this topic.

      Numerous reports and summaries I have seen describe the European green crab as first being discovered in June of 1998 in Willapa Bay, followed by Grays Harbor a month later. That’s not to say that they didn’t arrive earlier and possibly died out. If green crabs were seen living on the Washington coast earlier than 1998, I think you should share that documentation with researchers studying the invasion as well as officials with the Washington Invasive Species Council. I would also be interested in seeing it.

      If true, an important question would be whether those earlier crabs were breeding. Since 1998, researchers believe the population has expanded and then contracted.

      Until last year, an extensive trapping program in many areas of Puget Sound failed to locate any green crabs, according to those involved in the program. The one crab found on San Juan Island is reported as the first ever discovered in the inland waters of Washington state. So far, no breeding has been confirmed.

Comments are closed.