E-Mail 'Humpback whales intervene in orca attacks against other species' To A Friend

Email a copy of 'Humpback whales intervene in orca attacks against other species' to a friend

* Required Field






Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 5 entries.



Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 5 entries.


E-Mail Image Verification

Loading ... Loading ...

2 thoughts on “Humpback whales intervene in orca attacks against other species

  1. “Hats off to our courageous humpbacks and best wishes to our little Steller sea lion, survivor for another day!” —naturalist Alethea Leddy, and “Sadly, despite their best efforts, they couldn’t save the calf.” —from the movie.
    Why are people taking sides in the outcome of a thin slice of a complex ecosystem? Are we preprogrammed from a young age by Disney movies and/or sports? Or do we think taking sides with the apparent underdog attracts more viewers/readers? What if the orcas were undernourished and seeking to provide a meal for one of their aging matriarchs? Who tells that part of the story? (I suppose it’s more difficult to know that part)
    What if a cow broke the slaughterhouse and a bunch of cows went free? Would McDonalds flood the media with that story? If so, who would be the underdog?

    Thanks for the great article. I’m not criticizing it, just wondering about our propensity seeing things as if they were made up of 2 competing sides, ours and theirs.

    1. Well, it’s cool because those orcas were transients. Read: NOT FROM AROUND HERE. Resident orcas only eat fish supposedly (didn’t know that until now) whereas these transient, uncouth, hobo undesirable orcas with their terminator model numbers, want to wreak havoc on the local population. As you see, these valiant Humpback saviours, sentries of the Salish sea saved our beloved local sea lion joe from impending doom. He’s an upstanding citizen. Always a good sport when there are too many on a channel buoy. Good news!

      What are you a sociopath?

Comments are closed.