Diver comes up with rare undersea images

UPDATE, June 14, 2010
John Williams’ latest project is a video tour to explain the importance of the nearshore region of our marine waterways. Called “The Invisible Shoreline,” the free program is designed to help people understand the importance of the dynamic shoreline region. Showings are from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at Long Lake Community Center, 5448 Long Lake Rd SE, Pt Orchard; Thursday at Franklin Masonic Lodge, 5 Rainier Ave. Port Gamble; and Saturday at Poulsbo Marine Science Center, 18743 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. For information, go to the website SEA-Inside.
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I’ve been wanting to write about John Williams for years, but it never came together for one reason or another — until Saturday’s Kitsap Sun.

John Williams

I recall talking about John’s beautiful underwater videos to fellow reporters at the Sun starting several years ago. At least two reporters seemed quite enthusiastic about the prospects for a story, but I guess other stories intervened for them.

So when I heard that John was giving one of his community presentations last night, I thought it was time for me to describe his work and his goals, which include bringing images of undersea creatures to people who might never know what goes on in Puget Sound. His 25-minute video segments, called “SEA Inside — Pacific Northwest,” are shown on more than 60 community access television stations across the nation.

Regular readers of Watching Our Water Ways may recognize John Williams’ name as a contributor. He is high on environmental education and frequently offers comments on this subject.

My own diving experience goes back to my high school and college years. When my family moved to Mercer Island from Kansas, I immediately took advantage of the proximity to the saltwater. I took a dive class and spent time with friends diving all over Puget Sound, both from the shore and from a runabout that belonged to my girlfriend’s dad.

During my senior year of college, I needed some money, so I sold my diving gear. Following graduation, I moved to Idaho. After I returned to this region two years later, I never got around to taking up the sport, although I am still thinking that I’ll take another dive course and get started again.

Anyway, about 100 people joined Williams in Seabeck last night, according to one estimate. John suspects that some were attracted by my story. As he described it, when he asked how many people in the audience were divers, about two-thirds put their hands up. When he asked how many people went diving in the cold waters of Puget Sound, about a third of the hands went up.

If anyone would like to talk about their diving experiences, I am more than willing to offer this forum for a discussion.

Leopard nudibranch / Photo courtesy of John Williams

2 thoughts on “Diver comes up with rare undersea images

  1. UPDATE, June 14, 2010
    John Williams’ latest project is a video tour to explain the importance of the nearshore region of our marine waterways. Called “The Invisible Shoreline,” the free program is designed to help people understand the importance of the dynamic shoreline region. Showings are from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at Long Lake Community Center, 5448 Long Lake Rd SE, Pt Orchard; Thursday at Franklin Masonic Lodge, 5 Rainier Ave. Port Gamble; and Saturday at Poulsbo Marine Science Center, 18743 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. For information, go to the website SEA-Inside.

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