Speeding not a big problem on Bayshore Drive

The in basket: Georgianna Sweet, who lives at the Golden Tides senior housing complex on Bayshore Drive in Silverdale, says a fire hydrant near the building has been hit twice this year by speeding drivers.
She wonders about tactics to slow cars down in their neighborhood, where a lot of older people walk. She mentioned speed humps.


The in basket: Georgianna Sweet, who lives at the Golden Tides senior housing complex on Bayshore Drive in Silverdale, says a fire hydrant near the building has been hit twice this year by speeding drivers.
She wonders about tactics to slow cars down in their neighborhood, where a lot of older people walk. She mentioned speed humps.
The out basket: Jeff Shea, traffic engineer with Kitsap County Public Works, says they have been working on improving pedestrian safety there, but speed humps are not in the cards.
“We met with the apartment manager and Lt. (John) Gese of the Sheriff’s Department a few weeks ago to discuss this issue,” Jeff said. “The Sheriff’s Department said they would do some emphasis patrols.”
The county also put a crosswalk in at the intersection of Bayshore and Washington, he said. “Also, Kitsap Transit had agreed to move their bus stop closer to this crosswalk. In addition a Pedestrian Ahead warning sign was placed for southbound traffic prior to the apartments.”
It sounds like speed humps have fallen out of favor, which doesn’t surprise me given the design the county has used previously. They require much slower speeds than, say, those Bremerton installs. Doug Bear of Public Works says the last one the county paid for was put in Indianola in 2004.
There are numerous roads and streets where the county won’t even consider speed humps and similar traffic control devices, including those four lanes wide, those designated as arterials, steep slopes and common emergency vehicle routes. In Bayshore Drive’s case, the fact it is classified a “business access road” disqualifies it.
And the speeding problems there aren’t very serious, says Jeff. “About 95 percent of traffic was traveling at 29 mph or slower. There are not many roads in Kitsap County with this good of a compliance rate.
“Other considerations would also preclude traffic calming there,” he said. “Speed humps are limited to roads with average daily traffic counts of between 200 and 3,000 vehicles. Over 3,700 vehicles per day travel Bayshore. We only consider roads where 25 percent of the traffic drives at least 10 mph over the posted speed limit. On Bayshore that percentage is less than 1 percent.”
You can learn a lot more about how to apply for speed humps in your neighborhood, and what will determine your chances of success on the county’s Web site. Go to www.kitsapgov.com/pw/roads.htm and click on Traffic Safety Program, then scroll down to Protecting Neighborhoods Through Traffic Calming.
A tip to help you understand the text. “Streamlined speed hump projects” are those the county pays for. There are also two ways described for the residents of a qualifying street to pay for their installation. That hasn’t happened very often either, Doug says.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Before you post, please complete the prompt below.

Is water a solid or a liquid at room temperature?