Morning News: It’s Police over Principal in Schools

Let’s say a fist fight breaks out at a local school and two boys are eventually seperated. Is it a trip to the principal’s office for possible a possible suspension?

These days, it’s not a fist fight, it’s an assault — and in many cases, it will involve a trip to to “juvie hall” — AKA jail for juveniles — in the back of a patrol car.

Whereas school officials once handled most disciplinary issues (remember the days a trip to the vice principal’s office was a scary thing?), these days, fears of gun-weilding teens and alleged lawsuit-happy parents have made them a matter for police, not principals.

It’s gone too far, according to some families interviewed by the Texas-based Dallas Morning News, in a Friday story.

“Much of the responsibility for discipline has shifted from the principal’s office to the patrol car,” writes Karen Ayres of the Morning News. “Recent events in local schools reflect the trend.”


Let’s say a fist fight breaks out at a local school and two boys are eventually seperated. Is it a trip to the principal’s office for possible a possible suspension?

These days, it’s not a fist fight, it’s an assault — and in many cases, it will involve a trip to to “juvie hall” — AKA jail for juveniles — in the back of a patrol car.

Whereas school officials once handled most disciplinary issues (remember the days a trip to the vice principal’s office was a scary thing?), these days, fears of gun-weilding teens and alleged lawsuit-happy parents have made them a matter for police, not principals.

It’s gone too far, according to some families interviewed by the Texas-based Dallas Morning News, in a Friday story.

“Much of the responsibility for discipline has shifted from the principal’s office to the patrol car,” writes Karen Ayres of the Morning News. “Recent events in local schools reflect the trend.”

To read the story, click here.

Law enforcement in our own area claims to have thwarted two plans to bring guns to school recently — one at Key Peninsula Middle School and one at Central Kitsap Junior High School.

Have what some call “the age of lawsuits” and a teen’s heightened propensity for violence changed the system altogether? Who do you think should handle school fights: educators or law enforcement?

Where do we draw the line?

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