Tag Archives: Hampton Beach

Amusing Monday: Amazing sand sculptures are but brief creations

Creativity, humanity and whimsy seem to be abundant qualities among the sand sculptors producing unique works of art at various competitions across the United States this year.

“Dance of the Undefined,” first place in the Hampton Beach Sand Sculpting Competition. Artist: Mélineige Beauregard, Montreal, Quebec. // Photo: Hampton Beach Facebook page

In June, the Hampton Beach Sand Sculpting Competition in New Hampshire celebrated its 17th anniversary by attracting more than a dozen professional artists, including at least five from Canada.

This year’s winner at Hampton Beach was Mélineige Beauregard from Montreal, Quebec. Her work in sand, titled “Dance of the Undefined,” shows a woman from the waist up with honeycomb arms stretched above her head. Mélineige explained that the piece represents how people are constantly changing in some ways while staying the same in others.

She considers art as a kind of spiritual experience, according her to bio on the Hampton Beach website.

“When my hands touch the material, when my heart opens to give life, when my head is illuminated by light, I become the co-creator of the universe,” she was quoted as saying. “An artist is one who spiritualizes matter. For me, art is a means of communication, a way to transmit the energy of life, to affirm its vastness and its beauty.”

Mélineige has won more than 30 individual awards in sand sculpting. In 2004, she teamed up with her father, renowned sculptor Guy Beauregard, to win the World Championship doubles competition. Last year, she was the winner at the Revere Beach International Sand Sculpting Festival in Massachusetts. See the article by Liz Vanderau in Boston University Today. A slideshow of the Hampton Beach sculptures was posted on YouTube by Ammoguy5. Winners were listed on the Hampton Beach website with photos on the Hampton Beach Facebook page.

“Soul Evolution,” first place in the Revere Beach International Sand Sculpting Frestival. Artist: Pavel Mylnikov, Moscow, Russia.
Photo: Revere Beach Facebook page

This year’s winner at the Revere Beach competition, July 21-23, was Pavel Mylnikov of Moscow, Russia. His sculpture, titled “Soul Evolution,” is an intricately carved piece with two masculine angels on a rocky outcropping. Artist-reporters Dan Doubleday and Meredith Corson-Doubleday of RevereTV do a nice job of explaining their craft in a series of videos. Below, I’ve linked to two videos focused on four sculptures in this year’s competition — including entries by Pavel and Mélineige:

The festivals at Hampton Beach and Revere Beach are listed among the top 10 sand-sculpting competitions in the United States, according to Coastal Living magazine. Also making the list is the SandSations Sandcastle Competition in Long Beach, Wash. (See Facebook for some random photos and a list of winners.)

Another great sand-sculpting festival was held this year on July 14 and 15 at Imperial Beach, California. NBC 7, San Diego put together a nice video of the top winners.

“Neptune’s Organ,” first place in the 2016 Virginia Beach International Sand Sculpting Championship. Artists: Meredith Corson Doubleday and Dan Doubleday, Florida.
Photo: Virginia Beach website

Still to come this year is the International Sand Sculpting Championship, Sept. 30 to Oct. 8 in Virginia Beach, Va. The event is part of the Virginia Beach Neptune Festival. More than 30 of the world’s top sculptors are scheduled to compete along with separate competitions for amateur sculptors.

Last year’s first-place winner in Virginia Beach was Mélineige Beauregard, mentioned above. The first-place in team competition was won by Meredith Corson Doubleday and Dan Doubleday, mentioned above as artist-reporters in the Revere Beach competition. Their sculpture, Neptune’s Organ, also took the Neptune’s Choice, Sculptors’ Choice and People’s Choice awards in the team division.

Winners from 2016 contest in Virgina Beach can be seen on the festival’s winners page.

After enjoying dozens of photos showing amazing sculptures, I can’t help but think about the fragility and temporary nature of these artworks. For all their beauty and intricacy, as well as the thoughts and emotions they inspire, these sculptures soon disappear, and the artists are left to prepare for their next fleeting creation.

Amusing Monday: Sand sculpting continues to make an impression

Sand sculptors from throughout the world continue to turn their unique ideas into temporary masterpieces to be washed away with the tide. Only memories and photographs remain of these intricate, but fleeting, art objects.

"Life" (side 1) by Karen Fralich took first place at the Hampton Beach Master Sand Sculpting Competiton in June. Photo: Hampton Beach Village District
“Life” (side 1) by Karen Fralich took first place at the Hampton Beach Master Sand Sculpting Competiton in June.
Photo: Hampton Beach Village District

Perhaps someone can tell me if this unusual art form is on the increase or decline. Some sand-sculpture festivals keep going each year; some have disappeared; and new ones have started up since I started featuring this art form in 2009. Last year (Water Ways, Aug. 25, 2014), I rounded up all the “Amusing Monday” pieces about sand sculpture. I remain as impressed with the new work today as I have ever been.

In June, Hampton Beach, N.H., was the site of the 15th annual “Master Sand Sculpting Competition,” which is about as good as it gets. The first two pictures on this page show opposite sides of a sand sculpture created at the festival. The piece, which artist Karen Fralich calls “Life,” took First Place at the festival this year.

Other top winners are featured in a very nice gallery of photos on the Hampton Beach website. The artists discuss their work in a series of videos by Newhampshiredotcom. Though the sound quality leaves something to be desired, I did find it interesting to hear these folks describe their very interesting concepts:

"Life" (side 2) by Karen Fralich Photo: Hampton Beach Village District
“Life” (side 2) by Karen Fralich
Photo: Hampton Beach Village District

Another noteworthy festival is the 12th annual Revere Beach National Sand Sculpting Festival in Massachusetts. The theme this year was “The Spirit of Massachusetts.”

The best photo gallery of the winning entries was a nice presentation by Boston magazine. The contest features both solo and doubles entries, adding a extra element of excitement.

“Open Your Mind and Let Your Spirit Fly” by Mélineige Beauregard took first place at Revere Beach. Photo:RevereBeach.com
“Open Your Mind and Let Your Spirit Fly” by Mélineige Beauregard took first place at Revere Beach. // Photo:RevereBeach.com

The winner in the solo competition was Mélineige Beauregard of Montreal for “Open Your Mind and Let Your Spirit Fly,” shown in the third photo on this page.

Some additional images were provided by Boston photographer Matt Conti in the publication “North End Waterfront.com”

Another good competition is the Texas SandFest held in May in Aransas, Texas. A list of winners with photos is featured on the festival’s website.

Coney Island held its 25th annual Sand Sculpting Contest this past weekend. So far, few worthwhile photo galleries have been posted, but reporter Kate Cummings of Brooklyn TV News 12 had a report, which I posted in the video player at the bottom of this page. Last year’s event was featured nationally on ABC’s Good Morning America.

Finally, coming in our state, Olympia’s annual Sand in the City festival will be held this weekend. Sponsored by the Hands On Children’s Museum, it should have some excellent sand sculptures, though the event is not rated as a top-tier competition. Last year’s sculptures can be seen on the museum’s website.

For a fairly complete list of sand sculpting events in the U.S. and Canada, go to SandSculptingEvents.com.


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Amusing Monday: Festivals as fleeting as sand

Master sand sculptors from throughout the world have been stretching their imaginations this year at various sand-sculpting festivals where they’ve been putting their unique abilities on display.

“Inseminate” by Guy-Olivier Deveau of Quebec City, Canada, first place in the Master Sand Sculpting Competition in Hampton Beach, N.H. Photo courtesy of Hampton Beach
“Inseminate” by Guy-Olivier Deveau of Quebec City, first place in the Master Sand Sculpting Competition in Hampton Beach, N.H.
Photo courtesy of Hampton Beach Village District

In June, the 14th annual Master Sand Sculpting Competition in Hampton Beach, N.H., brought together a dozen amazing artists, including first-place winner Guy-Olivier Deveau from Quebec City, Canada. Deveau’s sculpture “Inseminate” (shown here) was done as a tribute to the recently deceased Swiss artist H.R. Giger, who helped create the creature in the movie “Alien,” according to festival organizers.

I am both amused and inspired by Carl Jara’s piece, “Putting Down Roots,” which depicts a friendly embrace between man and nature (second photo on this page). Jara, of Cleveland, Ohio, continues to impress me with his imaginary figures.

“Putting Down Roots” by Carl Jara of Cleveland, Ohio, third place Photo courtesy of Hampton Beach
“Putting Down Roots” by Carl Jara of Cleveland, Ohio, third place
Photo courtesy of Hampton Beach Village District

Tacoma’s Sue McGrew participated in Hampton Beach, creating a thoughtful piece she called “Mother’s Protection” (third on this page). For a full gallery of photos of the sand sculptures, visit the Hampton Beach visitors page or the Flickr page created for the event.

“Putting Down Roots” by Carl Jara of Cleveland, Ohio, third place Photo courtesy of Hampton Beach
“Mother’s Protection” by Sue McGrew of Tacoma
Photo courtesy of Hampton Beach Village District

I am sorry to learn that the Arts in Action festival held in Port Angeles for nearly a half-century will come to an end after this year’s event, Sept. 5-7.

The folks running the Port Angeles festival were no longer able to continue, and nobody stepped up to take it over, according to Doc Reiss, sand sculpture organizer.

“Forty-nine years is a good, long run,” Reiss told reporter Arwyn Rice of the Peninsula Daily News, who tells the history of the sand-sculpture competition and the decision to end it this year.

McGrew and Sandis Kondrats of Latvia will creates tribute sculptures this year in Port Angeles to recognize 10 years of master-level sand sculpting in the remote city on the Olympic Peninsula. I have been pleased to report on the event as an “Amusing Monday” feature since 2009:

Master-level sand sculpting also has come and gone from Federal Way, which just goes to show that these festivals are as ephemeral as the sand sculptures themselves.

In 2011, amateur photographer Flint Weiss of Maple Valley shot the Federal Way sculptures, then he told me why he loved them but was worried about their future. His words turned out to be prophetic:

“I do feel that art is enriching and that everybody is capable of producing some,” he wrote in an e-mail. “One of the things I like about sand sculpture is how solid and crisp everything looks, when it is really only made from sand.

“That makes sculptures like these feel somewhat improbable, making them all the more impressive. I also really enjoy the sheer artistry involved. While it’s easy for me (or any of us) to take a trowel to a pile of sand, it never looks anything like what these folks do.

“It’s sad,” he continued, “that this contest doesn’t get the public support it deserves. Given how much Western Washington loves both art and craftsmanship, it’s kind of surprising that the contest isn’t more popular.”

After three years in Federal Way, the World Championship of Sand Sculptures moved on to Atlantic City, N.J., as I reported in “Water Ways”:

Check out this year’s Atlantic City entries in a slide show created by Jordan Herelle.

In other areas, “Boston” magazine” covered the 2014 Revere Beach National Sand Sculpting Festival, which featured the theme “Stars and Stripes: A Tribute to Our Nation’s Armed Forces” to coincide with the 70th anniversary of D-Day. (Don’t miss the extended slide show at the bottom of the page.)

“My SA” in San Antonio covered the Texas SandFest in Port Aransas. See also Tim Burdick’s photos of the event.