Watching Our Water Ways

Environmental reporter Christopher Dunagan discusses the challenges of protecting Puget Sound and all things water-related.
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Posts Tagged ‘entertainment’

Amusing Monday: Odd poses on Splash Mountain

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

Every so often, a group of people will get a photo idea and jump on a ride called Splash Mountain. Remember Splash Mountain, the popular log-flume attraction at Disneyland and other Disney parks?

How about a game of Monopoly just before you drop over a cliff and into the water with a big splash? Is there a better time to read a newspaper? Or shave? Or offer a marriage proposal to your loved one?

These staged events have been captured on the ride’s camera near the end of the trip. If you are in the photo, apparently the ride’s staff is willing to sell you the picture. Some people, as we can see here, have gone to some lengths to get a funny picture.

It appears the identity of these people is lost, and I’m not sure how these photos were collected. But these same pictures can be found on many websites with a few variations. One site is Imgur. A few additional photos are added in Heavy, with slight changes in Twisted Sifter.

Even for those who don’t wish to take a crazy photo, Splash Mountain remains popular at Disneyland, Tokyo Disneyland and Disney World’s Magic Kingdom. The ride has an interesting history, because many of the characters are from the 1946 Disney movie “Song of the South.” The Audio-Animatronics figures originally were pulled from a ride called American Sings, which came closer to the movie but was not attracting much of a crowd. That ride was shut down and dismembered to help hold down the cost of Splash Mountain, which was over budget during construction in 1988.

That’s how Br’er Rabbit, Br’er Fox and Br’er Bear became part of the Splash Mountain experience. By the way, “Song of the South,” which is based on Uncle Remus stories, has never been fully released on home video, apparently because of racial sensitivities, according to Wikipedia.


Amusing Monday: Save time with ‘Water in a Bag!’

Monday, June 28th, 2010

Here’s a new product that will help harried cooks save time and avoid confusion: Water in a Bag!

Click here
to view a commercial demonstrating this amazing product. This commercial was shown on the Canadian comedy show “This Hour has 22 Minutes.”

The satirical program has been around on CBC television since 1993. Because it is written for a Canadian audience, U.S. viewers may not get some of the political references. Also, we may not realize when U.S. politicians and political groups are being mocked — such as when Americans worry about government-run health care, which is relatively popular in Canada.

On the other hand, Americans and Canadians have plenty of silliness they can share, ranging from random fees charged by the airlines to concerns over global warming. Here’s a sampling of the various styles of humor.

Tsunami Early Warning

Climate Change Time Capsule

Air Canada

Obama’s Peace Prize

One Million Acts of Green


Future Festival moving to Kitsap Fairgrounds

Sunday, May 30th, 2010

Organizers are getting ready for the third annual Great Peninsula Future Festival, which is being moved from Port Gamble to the Kitsap County Fairgrounds between Bremerton and Silverdale to make it more convenient for people to attend.

Poster for Great Peninsula Future Festival (click to enlarge)

The festival will be Saturday, July 31, and Sunday, August 1, in the lower field north of the Kitsap Sun Pavilion. This morning, organizer Gene Bullock sent me a copy of the new poster for the event. (Click to enlarge.)

The basic idea remains a combination of entertainment, food and environmental education, all coordinated to create a fun and educational event. This year, the plan is to offer a bluegrass festival on Saturday and more of a mixed variety of music on Sunday.

“We are trying to appeal to a larger audience,” Gene told me. “Saturday, we will have a festival within a festival, and we’ll bring in several bluegrass bands.”

Last year’s price of $7.50 per adult has been reduced to $5, and readily-available coupons will bring the price down to $3 for many people. The admission price and location are designed to increase interest in the event, which started two years ago with about 5,000 people but failed to match that attendance last year.

Great Peninsula Future Festival’s website
will be updated as new entertainers and activities are added between now and the end of July.


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"In the end, we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we understand, and we will understand only what we are taught."Baba Dioum, Senegalese conservationist

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