Watching Our Water Ways

Environmental reporter Christopher Dunagan discusses the challenges of protecting Puget Sound and all things water-related.
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Posts Tagged ‘Disneyland Park’

Amusing Monday: Odd poses on Splash Mountain

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

Every so often, a group of people will get a photo idea and jump on a ride called Splash Mountain. Remember Splash Mountain, the popular log-flume attraction at Disneyland and other Disney parks?

How about a game of Monopoly just before you drop over a cliff and into the water with a big splash? Is there a better time to read a newspaper? Or shave? Or offer a marriage proposal to your loved one?

These staged events have been captured on the ride’s camera near the end of the trip. If you are in the photo, apparently the ride’s staff is willing to sell you the picture. Some people, as we can see here, have gone to some lengths to get a funny picture.

It appears the identity of these people is lost, and I’m not sure how these photos were collected. But these same pictures can be found on many websites with a few variations. One site is Imgur. A few additional photos are added in Heavy, with slight changes in Twisted Sifter.

Even for those who don’t wish to take a crazy photo, Splash Mountain remains popular at Disneyland, Tokyo Disneyland and Disney World’s Magic Kingdom. The ride has an interesting history, because many of the characters are from the 1946 Disney movie “Song of the South.” The Audio-Animatronics figures originally were pulled from a ride called American Sings, which came closer to the movie but was not attracting much of a crowd. That ride was shut down and dismembered to help hold down the cost of Splash Mountain, which was over budget during construction in 1988.

That’s how Br’er Rabbit, Br’er Fox and Br’er Bear became part of the Splash Mountain experience. By the way, “Song of the South,” which is based on Uncle Remus stories, has never been fully released on home video, apparently because of racial sensitivities, according to Wikipedia.


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"In the end, we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we understand, and we will understand only what we are taught."Baba Dioum, Senegalese conservationist

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