Tag Archives: BirdNote

Amusing Monday: BirdNote to expand while keeping short radio format

BirdNote, the radio program, has been bringing us the amusing sounds and stories of birds for more than a dozen years. Now, a new managing producer, Jason Saul, is working to expand the horizons of the daily two-minute show that can be heard on more than 200 public radio stations across the country.

Jason chose Bremerton as his personal base of operations. He can work out of his home and head to Seattle for meetings and recording sessions as needed. Jason, who moved from New Orleans, says Kitsap County has everything he needs, and he enjoys the local low-key atmosphere of this area. Read on for more about that later.

BirdNote began as a project of Seattle Audobon, which created a team of writers, scientists and sound artists to portray accurate and intriguing stories of birds. The program went on the air in February 2005, when it was launched by KPLU-FM, an NPR affiliate that now goes by the call letters KNKX.

BirdNote became its own separate nonprofit organization in 2006, funded mainly by donors who love the show. Today, it can be heard in big and small markets across the country, as well as well as in podcast format whenever people choose to listen.

Jason Saul

The two-minute radio show will continue as always, but Jason tells me that he is pushing to expand the storytelling beyond the traditional bird-of-the-day into stories of people as they relate to birds. The Port Orchard Seagull Calling Contest is proposed as a feature story, currently scheduled for October.

Because the two-minute program is already available on numerous podcast websites, BirdNote has begun to offer expanded podcasts for people who can’t get enough. These won’t be heard on the radio, at least for now.

To launch the expanded format, the program commissioned a new theme song, based on the short jingle that introduces each BirdNote segment. The songwriter, Ben Mirin (a.k.a. DJ Ecotone), has a rare love of natural sounds, which he brings back to the studio and adds his own voice to create an amusing beatbox flavor.

“The music is intended to be a statement from BirdNote,” Jason said. “We are trying to say that we are doing things in different ways.”

Here’s the song that DJ Ecotone came up with. Can you identify 12 different bird calls?

      1. DJ-ECOTONE-BIRDNOTE-mash-up

Jason thought it would be nice to introduce the new theme song and longer format by interviewing Mr. Ecotone. I have to admit that I found the interview intriguing, as Ben describes his passion for nature and music. The interview can be heard in the box below.

As for Jason, he, too, has a passion for the environment, and he has embraced the unique style of BirdNote’s storytelling. His goal is to keep the program fresh as people absorb information in new ways.

“I want to maintain the highest journalistic standards,” he told me. “But there’s a sense of change. People are accessing information in different ways.”

Getting people into the stories about birds — such as a narrative report on an organized club of teenage birders in San Bernardino, Calif. — should broaden the interest, he said.

“We don’t want to get away from stories about birds,” Jason said, “but we are not telling stories to birds. We are telling stories to people. The narrative structure of how to tell a story involves people’s voices. I am hoping for an evolution of sound into a place where different stories can be told.”

Transcripts of the podcasts are available for those who would rather read than listen to the stories, Jason noted. People can keep up with the new features and photos on Facebook, Twitter and more, or enjoy the archived programs that were missed the first time around. Extra tidbits can be found on BirdNote blog.

While individual donations are the mainstay of BirdNote’s budget, the organization has begun to accept donations from corporate sponsors compatible with the mission of bringing the wonders of birds to the public.

Jason started his media career in New York and moved in 2003 to New Orleans, where he reported on regional stories, such as Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill. From 2006 to 2011, he served as a researcher and production associate for “American Routes,” a popular radio show featuring Nick Spitzer. Before moving to Bremerton, Jason was director of digital services and corporate development for WWNO, the New Orleans public radio station.

Jason, who lives off Burwell Street in West Bremerton, maintains production equipment in a corner of his house, so he can do much of his work at home. BirdNote is based in Seattle, with offices in one location and a sound studio in another, but Jason always chooses to live in places somewhat removed from the cosmopolitan atmosphere.

“I love working from home,” he told me. “I used to work in a cubicle. The people in Bremerton and Kitsap County are wonderful … so warm and welcoming.”

For an area described by some as a “backwater,” Jason said he finds Kitsap County to be anything but that. “Everybody is on top of everything.”

The public library system is as good as that in New Orleans, he said. The buses run on time, and it is easy to get around.

“The natural beauty is amazing,” he said, adding that Olympic National Park is a true wonder.

Jason said he is open to suggestions, story ideas and general involvement from people who enjoy BirdNote. “The more people involved the better.”

Amusing Monday: Some birds just make us laugh

The common murre, which can be spotted in Puget Sound especially in winter, may be considered “nature’s laugh track,” according to Bob Sundstrom, writing for “BirdNote,” a two-minute radio show heard on public radio stations including KPLU.

Common murre Photo: Dick Daniels, carolinabirds.org, via Wikimedia Commons
Common murre
Photo: Dick Daniels, carolinabirds.org

I wasn’t sure what he meant until I heard the call clearly, and then I wanted to share this amusing sound with readers who missed the program.

“The Common Murre’s guttural call carries well over the roar of the waves, a natural laugh track, far richer than human laughter canned for a sitcom,” says narrator Michael Stein in the following sound clip.

      1. Common murres on Birdnote.

To learn more about the common murre in Washington state, check out Birdweb by Seattle Audubon or read the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s report, “Biology and Conservation of the Common Murre in California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia
” (PDF 10 mb).

For other amusing bird sounds, I pulled a YouTube video created with the help of Nick Lund, who writes a blog called “The Birdlist.” This video was posted on National Public Radio’s science program “Skunk Bear.”

Andy Jeffrey of Earth Touch Network points out that the bald eagle’s less-than-intimidating chirp may not be the strangest call, but it may be the most surprising. For films and such, Hollywood producers have dubbed in the screech of a red-tailed hawk to give the eagle a more imposing sound.

We can’t leave the topic of funny bird sounds without taking time to listen to the lyre bird, known for its ability to mimic all sorts of sounds. And who better to sneak with us through the underbrush and explain this odd bird than the BBC’s David Attenborough. Check out the video.

While all of these bird sounds are amusing, who would you say is the most amusing bird? The question is open to debate, but I always get a kick out of the thievery of the various species of sea gull. The compilation video below offers a sampling of this clever bird’s antics. As you’ll see, a few other clever birds also are featured.

Amusing Monday: ‘BirdNote’ telling stories for the past 10 years

Saturday will be the 10th anniversary of “BirdNote,” a public radio program about birds from all over the world, with frequent references to Puget Sound and the Pacific Northwest.

The well-produced audio segment resembles “StarDate,” which was the inspiration for the show, as founder Chris Peterson describes in a program to be aired this week. Check out the page “BirdNote at 10: 10 years of stories about birds and nature!” or listen to this clip:

      1. 150221-BirdNote-at-10


Marty, the marsh wren, is BirdNote's mascot. Click image for info about his travels.
Marty, the marsh wren, is BirdNote’s mascot. Click for info about his travels.

BirdNote originated in 2005 at a single station — KPLU in Tacoma — and expanded to 50 participating stations by 2010 with about 200 stations today, according to a list of facts put together for the anniversary. Birdnote began as a once-a-week segment before expanding to daily segments in 2008.

The searchable archive covers more than 1,200 shows, featuring more than 650 species of birds. Besides the daily audio clips, each webpage links to related sources — including photos or videos; a little history or biography; scientific explanations; occasional notes or blogs; and often more information about the featured birds.

In honor of the 10th anniversary of BirdNote, and since this is a blog about water issues, I’ve picked out 20 clips from the past two years or so that I think you will enjoy:

Marbled murrelets: As fish go, so go the murrelets (December 2012)

      2. 121215-Marbled-Murrelets-and-DNA

Winter on the Columbia: It may be winter, but there’s a lot to see… (December 2012)

      3. 121222-Winter-on-the-Columbia

Seabirds in decline: What’s become of them? (January 2013)

      4. 130111-Seabirds-in-Decline

Red-throated Loons of Deception Pass: They can’t walk on land, but they’re graceful in flight! (March 2013)

      5. 130305-Red-throated-Loons-at-Deception-Pass

Double-crested cormorant: What are they doing with wings like that? (April 2013)

      6. 130402-Double-crested-Cormorant

Probing with sandpipers: The right tool for the job (April 2013)

      7. 130420-Probing-with-Sandpipers

Citizen scientists monitor pigeon guillemots: Dedication, information, and …. a tattoo? (September 2013)

      8. 130906-Citizen-Scientists-Monitor-Pigeon-Guillemots

Tony Angell reflects on nature: From Puget Sound through an artist’s eye (October 2013)

      9. 131004-Tony-Angell-Reflects-on-Nature

Buffleheads in Winter: Our smallest duck returns from the north! (December 2013)

      10. 131201-Buffleheads-in-Winter

The Ballet of the Grebes: Birds do the strangest things! (May 2014)

      11. 140519-The-Ballet-of-the-Grebes

Monitoring Rhinoceros Auklets on Protection Island: Auklets are fascinating research subjects! (June 2014)

      12. 140626-Monitoring-Rhinoceros-Auklets-on-Protection-Island

Amazing aquatic American dipper: What’s that bird doing in the river? (August 2014)

      13. 140808-Amazing-Aquatic-American-Dipper

The heron and the snake: It’s a rough world for a young blue heron (September 2014)

      14. 140921-The-Heron-and-the-Snake

Chorus line in the sky: sandpipers in elegant fashion (October 2014)

      15. 141018-Chorus-Line-in-the-Sky

Gull identification: Black, white, gray… how do you sort them all out? (October 2014)

      16. 141024-Gull-Identification-I

The oystercatcher’s world: Life in the wave zone! (November 2014)

      17. 141108-The-Oystercatchers-World

The music of black scoters: A mysterious, musical wail… (November 2014)

      18. 141128-The-Music-of-Black-Scoters

Diving birds — below the surface: If only we could see them under water! (December 2014)

      19. 141222-Diving-Birds%E2%80%93Below-the-Surface

A swirl of snow geese: Barry Lopez and Snow Geese (January 2015)

      20. 150108-A-Swirl-of-Snow-Geese

What happens when birds get wet? Their rain shell shields their down layer (January 2015)

      21. 150126-What-Happens-When-Birds-Get-Wet