Category Archives: Recreation

Amusing Monday: Taking a wild ride on (or in) a killer whale or shark

I didn’t know anyone made a high-speed watercraft that resembles a killer whale until I saw Freeze List’s new video “8 Insane Water Toys that Everyone Must Try” (second video on this page).

This killer whale is built like a small aerodynamic submarine and is about the size of a real killer whale. It can race along on the surface, dive underwater, roll to the left or right, and even breach up into the air, as the operator adjusts aircraft-style controls.

The Killer Whale Y Model is one of three models of Seabreacher watercraft manufactured by Innespace Productions, based in New Zealand. The other two models are the smaller Shark X Model and the latest Dolphin Z Model, a revision of the first design.

If the videos of a speedy killer whale machine are not amusing enough, Seabreacher has produced a few oddball videos involving the watercraft. Check out the list at the end of this post.

The killer whale model is a two-seater with 360-degree viewing from within an enclosed canopy. It runs on a Rotax 1500-cc, four-stroke 260-horsepower motor. Features include a large whale tail, pectoral fins and a functioning blowhole.

As SeaWorld and other marine parks cease their killer whale performances — in which people often ride on the backs of live orcas — this manufactured whale can be built with grab handles and foot pegs to allow trained stunt people to do acrobatic feats on the outside of the machine.

Three years ago, writer Rohit Jaggi climbed into one of the Seabreacher cockpits on Shasta Lake near Redding, Calif. His goal was to write an article for the Financial Times of London. Riding with him was Rob Innes, a New Zealand boat builder who teamed up years ago with machinist Dan Piazza to create Innespace Productions.

“Drive it like you stole it,” Innes advised the reporter. “You can’t break it.”

“Obediently, I pull very hard on one of the two vertical levers in my hands, push on the other, and we switch instantly from a … straight line to a carving, steep turn to the left,” Rohit writes. “Keeping my right index finger tight on the trigger throttle, I reverse the positions of the levers and we are thrown into a tight right curve, banked so far over that water breaks over the transparent bubble canopy above our heads….

“I take a few minutes to dial my responses in, but it is not long before I am, indeed, driving it like I stole it… Rushing forward, planing on the lateral fins, I push the two levers forward and a wall of water rises swiftly up and over the canopy until the Seabreacher is underwater. All that remains above the surface is the midship-mounted vertical fin, which contains a snorkel for the engine air intake, slicing through the water at up to 40 kph.” (That’s about 25 miles per hour under water, or about half the maximum surface speed.)

The third video, at right, shows TV news reporter Avijah Scarbrough of KHSL in Los Angeles taking a spin on Shasta Lake, where Rob Innes has opened a division of Innespace.

Innespace Productions started in 1997 with a focus on high-performance submersible watercraft. More than 10 years of engineering and testing went into the Seabreacher models, which are custom built with a variety of options. Typical costs are between $80,000 and $100,000, according to “Frequently Asked Questions” posted on the company’s website.

One promotional video shows 109 different looks created for the three models, although some may have been shown more than once. I advise you to use the pause button to take a closer look at these machines. A large collection of related videos can be found on the Innespace Seabreacher Channel on YouTube.

A few amusing (or perhaps silly?) videos featuring the Seabreacher:

FEMA offers daily email briefings on weather, emergency conditions

One of the first emails I check out each morning is the “FEMA Daily Operations Briefing” issued by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. At a glance, I get an idea of significant weather events and emergency activities across the country.

Often, I see nothing that seems significant to me, and I move on to other email. But if something stands out, I click on the link that takes me to the full briefing in PDF format.

Today’s forecast. // Map: FEMA

This morning’s report, for example, told me that flash floods had occurred in various areas of the country and that dry thunderstorms were seen in parts of Oregon, California, Nevada and Idaho. Up until then, daily briefings included warnings that such events were about to occur.

The daily reports also include significant events, such as a non-injury train derailment and evacuation in Pennsylvania; tropical weather that could be a precursor to hurricanes and cyclones; space weather that could trigger aurora borealis; earthquakes; and disaster declarations.

The full daily briefing is also my shortcut to national weather maps with one-, two- and three-day forecasts for ordinary weather, as well as potential “severe” weather outlooks. I think the page should include a link to a more complete explanation of the colors used on the maps, but that information can be found on the website of the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center.

Daily reports from the past four years can be located in an online archive on FEMA’s website.

I thought readers of this blog might be interested in this daily briefing. Anyone can receive the briefings along with other information available by email by signing up on FEMA’s email-delivery page. Just scroll down and check “FEMA Daily Operations Briefing.”

While I’m on the subject of FEMA, I should mention the mobile app for smart phones, which includes the option to receive weather alerts for up to five counties in the U.S. along with different kinds of information. You can read about the app on the FEMA website.

Amusing Monday: Amazing sand sculptures are but brief creations

Creativity, humanity and whimsy seem to be abundant qualities among the sand sculptors producing unique works of art at various competitions across the United States this year.

“Dance of the Undefined,” first place in the Hampton Beach Sand Sculpting Competition. Artist: Mélineige Beauregard, Montreal, Quebec. // Photo: Hampton Beach Facebook page

In June, the Hampton Beach Sand Sculpting Competition in New Hampshire celebrated its 17th anniversary by attracting more than a dozen professional artists, including at least five from Canada.

This year’s winner at Hampton Beach was Mélineige Beauregard from Montreal, Quebec. Her work in sand, titled “Dance of the Undefined,” shows a woman from the waist up with honeycomb arms stretched above her head. Mélineige explained that the piece represents how people are constantly changing in some ways while staying the same in others.

She considers art as a kind of spiritual experience, according her to bio on the Hampton Beach website.

“When my hands touch the material, when my heart opens to give life, when my head is illuminated by light, I become the co-creator of the universe,” she was quoted as saying. “An artist is one who spiritualizes matter. For me, art is a means of communication, a way to transmit the energy of life, to affirm its vastness and its beauty.”

Mélineige has won more than 30 individual awards in sand sculpting. In 2004, she teamed up with her father, renowned sculptor Guy Beauregard, to win the World Championship doubles competition. Last year, she was the winner at the Revere Beach International Sand Sculpting Festival in Massachusetts. See the article by Liz Vanderau in Boston University Today. A slideshow of the Hampton Beach sculptures was posted on YouTube by Ammoguy5. Winners were listed on the Hampton Beach website with photos on the Hampton Beach Facebook page.

“Soul Evolution,” first place in the Revere Beach International Sand Sculpting Frestival. Artist: Pavel Mylnikov, Moscow, Russia.
Photo: Revere Beach Facebook page

This year’s winner at the Revere Beach competition, July 21-23, was Pavel Mylnikov of Moscow, Russia. His sculpture, titled “Soul Evolution,” is an intricately carved piece with two masculine angels on a rocky outcropping. Artist-reporters Dan Doubleday and Meredith Corson-Doubleday of RevereTV do a nice job of explaining their craft in a series of videos. Below, I’ve linked to two videos focused on four sculptures in this year’s competition — including entries by Pavel and Mélineige:

The festivals at Hampton Beach and Revere Beach are listed among the top 10 sand-sculpting competitions in the United States, according to Coastal Living magazine. Also making the list is the SandSations Sandcastle Competition in Long Beach, Wash. (See Facebook for some random photos and a list of winners.)

Another great sand-sculpting festival was held this year on July 14 and 15 at Imperial Beach, California. NBC 7, San Diego put together a nice video of the top winners.

“Neptune’s Organ,” first place in the 2016 Virginia Beach International Sand Sculpting Championship. Artists: Meredith Corson Doubleday and Dan Doubleday, Florida.
Photo: Virginia Beach website

Still to come this year is the International Sand Sculpting Championship, Sept. 30 to Oct. 8 in Virginia Beach, Va. The event is part of the Virginia Beach Neptune Festival. More than 30 of the world’s top sculptors are scheduled to compete along with separate competitions for amateur sculptors.

Last year’s first-place winner in Virginia Beach was Mélineige Beauregard, mentioned above. The first-place in team competition was won by Meredith Corson Doubleday and Dan Doubleday, mentioned above as artist-reporters in the Revere Beach competition. Their sculpture, Neptune’s Organ, also took the Neptune’s Choice, Sculptors’ Choice and People’s Choice awards in the team division.

Winners from 2016 contest in Virgina Beach can be seen on the festival’s winners page.

After enjoying dozens of photos showing amazing sculptures, I can’t help but think about the fragility and temporary nature of these artworks. For all their beauty and intricacy, as well as the thoughts and emotions they inspire, these sculptures soon disappear, and the artists are left to prepare for their next fleeting creation.

Bears have gathered for their annual feast at Alaska’s Brooks Falls

In plain view of one live camera, a bear waits patiently as leaping salmon fly all around. The bear is content to wait for for a big fish to leap into his paws or his mouth.

In front of another live camera, a group of bears forage downstream in the river, going underwater to get their salmon meal. One chews vigorously while standing upright in chest-deep water.

These are a couple of the scenes I’ve been watching this morning at the Brooks Falls overlook in Katmai National Park. I have never been to the national park, but I have enjoyed these live video feeds for years. It seems incredible that we can observe brown bears doing what they do naturally while remaining out of sight and hearing of the bears.

All four bear cams can be viewed at once from the Explore website. Scroll down the page to read comments from the camera operators and other folks watching remotely.

Park officials estimate that more than 100 bears use this mile-long stretch of Brooks River to feast on what they say is the largest sockeye salmon run in the world. These bears are part of a population of 2,200 that live in the park. It is said that bears outnumber people on the Alaska Peninsula.

Another group of live webcams are poised to capture the movements of Northern Resident killer whales in Blackney Pass, one of the primary travel routes for the whales during the summer months. Again, scroll down to view comments. The cameras are coordinated by OrcaLab, Paul Spong’s research station on Hanson Island in British Columbia’s Johnstone Strait.

For other critter cams, check out what I posted in April (Water Ways, April 24, 2017).

Can you identify these marine mammals seen in South Puget Sound?

Who the heck are these guys featured in this video posted on Facebook by meteorologist Nick Allard of KIRO-7 TV?

Pacific white-sided dolphins? Common dolphins? Dall’s porpoises? Harbor porpoises?

Based on the conflicting comments on Nick’s Facebook page, as well comments on reposts, a lot of people are insisting that they know what these animals are. But even some longtime Puget Sound residents got it wrong.

Annie Douglas of Cascadia Research took a look at the video, posted here with Nick’s permission. These creatures, she said, are long-beaked common dolphins.

Last summer, after these common dolphins first showed up, Annie wrote a blog post about their usual travels, noting that they are normally seen in Southern California and Mexico. It appears that they survived the winter a long way from home and have stayed in South Puget Sound, where Cascadia researchers are keeping track of their movements.

Rare long-beaked common dolphins have been spending time in South Puget Sound.
Photo courtesy of Nick Allard

They appear to be generally healthy, Annie said. She has heard reports of their feeding on small fish, and their energy level remains high as they “porpoise” out of the water and do other acrobatic feats.

Before this group showed up last year, the only previous confirmed sighting of long-beaked common dolphins was during the summer of 2003, when several individuals were seen in various locations, including the Boston Harbor area near Olympia, Dalco Passage near Tacoma and Whidbey Island.

Here’s how Annie describes the species:

“In appearance, they have a distinct black cape that extends into a saddle below their dorsal fin, a light underbelly, and a distinct dark eye to pectoral fin stripe. Their average length is 6-8.5 feet and they can weigh up to 500 lbs.

“They can be distinguished from harbor porpoise and Dall’s porpoise — the two species of porpoise commonly encountered in Puget Sound — by morphology, pigmentation, shape and behavior. Both porpoise species have fairly triangular dorsal fins, whereas the long-beaked common dolphin has a more ‘traditional’ falcate-shaped (curved) dorsal fin. Dall’s porpoise are all black with a white patch on their sides, and harbor porpoise are all gray-brown.

“Neither of the porpoise species expose much more than their back and dorsal fin when they surface, although Dall’s porpoise will often create a noticeable ‘rooster tail’ splash when swimming at top speed.

“Long-beaked common dolphins often leap out of the water so that much of their bodies are exposed, and they are also more likely to play in the wake of a boat than either of the local porpoise species. Pacific white-sided dolphins commonly found along Washington outer coast are occasionally found in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. They behave similar to the long-beaked common dolphin; however, they have a larger dorsal fin and more complicated black, gray and white pigmentation.”

Annie asks that people report sightings to Cascadia and send along any photos and videos to ABDouglas(at)cascadiaresearch.org. Sightings also can be reported by phone, (360) 943-7325.

Annie reminds boaters to stay at least 100 yards from marine mammals (200 yards for killer whales). It is illegal to harass, chase, feed or otherwise interfere with them, as provided by the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act.

Amusing Monday: Without a doubt, these dogs are athletes

UPDATE: July 19

Purina has posted videos of the Surf Dog competition for both large and small dogs. Check the bottom of this page to watch.
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In promotional materials, Purina calls these dogs “canine athletes” for their ability to perform and compete before crowds of observers.

This is the 20th year that Purina Pro Plan has sponsored the Incredible Dog Challenge, which features dog surfing, diving and agility contests, along with the freestyle flying disc competition, which comes about as close to dancing as a dog can get.

I’ve posted videos of the winners of the Diving Dog and Fetch It! finals on this page, including both the Western Regional and Eastern Regional competitions. If you enjoy these videos, you may wish to take time to watch the full competitions:

Both the Diving Dog and Fetch It! contests challenge the leaping ability of water-loving dogs. In Diving Dog, the canines leap off a 40-foot carpeted runway and try to go as far out as they can. The winner is the dog whose nose is the farthest when its chest hits the water.

Fetch It! uses the same runway but adds the physical challenge of touching an object at the end. The winner is the dog who is able to knock the object, called a bumper, the farthest out into the water.

While athletic ability is important, trainer Brianna Minshew of Rome, Ga., says the most important thing for a beginning dog is good obedience.

“My advice for those wanting to get into the sport of dock diving is to start off with a basic obedience class so the dog can learn to sit and/or down stay on the dock,” Brianna said on the Pro Plan’s website. “They also need to learn to track and retrieve a toy. What I believe is the most important is to find a local facility that has a pool and get proper instruction and safety tips for the dock and also to have fun with your dog.”


Brianna is staff supervisor at the Georgia Dog Gym. Her 4-year-old border collie, named Knox, took first place in the Diving Dog competition during the 2014 Eastern Regionals.

Other events in the Incredible Dog Challenge:

WESTERN REGIONAL FINALS

EASTERN REGIONAL FINALS

The Incredible Dog Challenge Eastern Regional Championship was held April 7 and 8 in St. Petersburg, Fla. The Western Regional Championship was held June 9-10 in Huntington Beach, Calif. The national finals are scheduled Sept. 29-30 in St. Louis, Mo.

The Western Regional Championships are scheduled to be rebroadcast on Aug. 3 at 9 p.m. on KING-TV, Channel 5, according to Carson International Events. I anticipate that the finals will be broadcast as well.

Note: The Surf Dog competition, also sponsored by Purina Pro Plan, is normally considered part of the Incredible Dog Challenge. It is my favorite event. So far, I have been unable to locate video of this year’s surfing competition, but I have asked the Purina folks if they have such video and can make it available. If something comes through, I will post an update.

Amusing Monday: Hey, did you see that strange dude at the beach?

Dude Perfect, a goofy group of friends who became known for their mouth-dropping trick shots and crazy stunts, has just released a video highlighting the quirkiness of people you might see hanging out at the beach.

The new video, first on this page, is part of the Dude Perfect “Stereotypes” series, which the guys started in 2013 by noting that players in basketball pickup games fall into certain obnoxious categories. Check on the second video on this page for the basketball stereotypes video.

I didn’t know that there were so many different kinds of fishermen until I watched the Dude Perfect “Fishing Stereotypes,” the third video on this page. As I watched the dudes act out a variety of characters, I realized that, Oh, yes, I have seen that guy!

I have to say that all of the stereotype videos are pretty good, because annoying people are everywhere. If you can’t laugh at them, what are you going to do?

As for the trick-shot videos, if you haven’t seen them, I recommend:

Dude Perfect got its start while the friends were betting each other sandwiches on who could make the best basketball trick shots, which became the subject of the first video, according to an entry in Wikipedia, which claims that Dude Perfect has broken several Guinness World Records and now has more than 3.2 billion views on all its videos. The article says Dude Perfect has 20 million subscribers, making it the 18th most subscribed channel on YouTube and the most subscribed sports-related channel.

Erlands Point family thrilled during orca encounter in Dyes Inlet

It was the thrill of a lifetime when a group of killer whales headed directly toward the Johnson family sitting in their boat on Dyes Inlet. The screams of delight leave no doubt, as you can see and hear from one of the best orca videos I’ve viewed in quite a while.

It was Wednesday evening this week, and the Johnsons had just put their 23-foot runabout in the water for the first time this summer. The family lives on Erlands Point in Dyes Inlet, and it seemed like a good idea to drive the boat over to the Bremerton Marina for dinner at Bremerton Bar and Grill, Julie Johnson told me.

On the way home, the boat was passing under the Manette Bridge when the group spotted the orcas. Aboard the boat were nine people: Julie and her husband Dr. Jerrold Johnson, their five kids, a nephew and a friend.

The boat passed the whales at a safe distance, Julie told me, then the boat slowed to a stop and the motor was turned off.

“They were coming in our direction, and then they turned and started coming right at us,” Julie recalled. “It was a little intimidating.”

Just before the whales reached the boat, they turned sharply and crossed behind the stern.

“It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” she said. “We all came home filled with excitement. We felt very lucky.”

Interestingly, the couple recently took a cruise in Alaska, thinking they would see killer whales. The only sighting was a group of whales far off in the distance.

As for Wednesday night, the boats on Dyes Inlet seemed to be keeping a safe distance from the whales, Julie said.

On Thursday, reports of boat traffic around the orcas were mixed, and Susan Berta of Orca Network said she received some emails with photos of boats that may have been violating the law. She forwarded the photos to federal law enforcement officers.

Federal law requires boaters to stay 200 yards to the sides of killer whales and more than 400 yards to the front.
Graphic: Be Whale Wise

“We kept getting complaints,” Susan said. “It is hard to tell from photos. One showed a boat that may have been close but was stopped. Some cases involved speedboats under full power following the whales and paralleling them close. It’s always hard to tell distances.”

When people are watching from shore, it is especially hard to tell how close the boats are to the whales, Susan said. It may look like boats are swarming around the whales when they may be at a safe distance.

People who have concerns about boater behavior can file a report directly by filling out a form on the Be Whale Wise website. The form goes to enforcement officers for NOAA Fisheries. One can also call the toll-free hotline, (800) 853-1964.

Federal regulations prohibit boat operators from approaching killer whales closer than 200 yards or to position a vessel in the path of a killer whale within 400 yards. A chart explaining the rules (PDF 8 mb) can be downloaded from the Be Whale Wise website.

The whales in Dyes Inlet this week were identified as marine-mammal-eating transient killer whales, probably part of a group of 30 to 50 transients spread around Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands starting on Tuesday, the Fourth of July.

The orcas in Puget Sound appeared to be at least four different family groups, according to Alisa Lemire Brooks, whale sighting coordinator for Orca Network. At least half a dozen orcas came into Dyes Inlet on Wednesday, she said, including an older female (T-36) and her daughter (T-36-B) plus the offspring of her daughter. Other identifications will probably come later. Yesterday, another group (the T99s) were seen among the whales.

When whales come into Dyes Inlet, good viewing locations from shore include Bremerton’s Lions Park when they are coming in or going out. If they stay around, you may be able to spot them from Tracyton or Chico boat launches or from Silverdale Waterfront Park.

Amusing Monday: Strangest impossible secrets of the ocean

“The Richest,” which bills itself as the “world’s most entertaining website,” often features celebrity gossip along with plenty of freakish people, animals and events. Sometimes the website tries to be helpful with videos such as “10 awesome school hacks every student should know.”

In short, it is a three-ring circus with thousands of different acts.

For amusement, I pulled up some water-related videos, which you can watch on this page or link to YouTube:

As implied by the name “The Richest,” this website goes out of its way to find opulent places and products, as in the gold-plated water bottle that one can buy for $60,000. See “10 times rich people took it too far.” It is also amusing to watch “10 ridiculously expensive things that President Trump owns.”

“The Richest” is owned by Valnet, Inc., based in St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada. The company operates 10 similar websites containing well-hyped stories on just about every topic, including :

“The web has a become a streamlined environment where operational excellence wins, and we have embraced this new reality to its fullest,” declares a statement on the Valnet website.

The company boasts of 80 million users with 52 million of them from the U.S., all producing 800 million page views a month. The managers are searching for web content producers, freelance writers and future staffers to build and manage its web production. See the webpage “Careers.”

Amusing Monday: After 83 years, duck stamps are still impressive

Canada geese are the centerpiece of this year’s federal “duck stamp,” which went on sale Friday to raise millions of dollars to conserve wildlife habitat.

James Hautman of Chaska, Minn., won first place in the annual duck stamp contest with his acrylic painting of Canada geese.
Images courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

James Hautman of Chaska, Minn., painted the artwork that became this year’s stamp following a contest last fall that attracted 152 entries. The stamp shows three Canada geese flying in formation over a wheat field.

This year’s winning entry is Hautman’s fifth win in the duck stamp competition. Only two other artists have won first place five times — and one of those is Hautman’s brother Joseph.

Since 1934, sales of the stamp — formally called the Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp — have reached $950 million, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which is in charge of the stamp. The money has been used to conserve nearly 6 million acres of wetland habitat as part of the national wildlife refuge system around the country. Some 98 percent of the funds from sales of the $25 duck stamp go into the Migratory Bird Conservation fund.

If you have time, check out all of the duck stamps starting with some interesting ones you will find in the 1930s and ’40s in the Federal Duck Stamp Gallery.

“The stamp’s impact goes beyond waterfowl,” said Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke in a news release. “it also helps provide habitat for hundreds of species of wildlife and clean water for our communities. The lands set aside using duck stamp dollars provide opportunities for the American people to enjoy the great outdoors through hunting, fishing and birdwatching, and help ensure this piece of American heritage will endure for generations.”

The stamp is legally required for waterfowl hunters age 16 and older, but the program has grown over the years thanks to stamp collectors and supporters of wildlife conservation. The current duck stamp also provides free admission to any national wildlife refuge.

Rebecca Knight of Appleton City, Mo., took second place with her acrylic painting of a brant.

The duck painting that took second place in last fall’s contest was the creation of Rebekah Knight of Appleton City, Mo., who previously won the National Junior Duck Stamp Contest. Her entry last year was an acrylic painting of a single brant.

The third-place winner was Robert Hautman of Delano, Minn., with his acrylic painting of a pair of Canada geese. Hautman, brother of James and Joseph, previously won the contest in 1996 and 2000.

Robert Hautman of Delano, Minn., was the third-place winner with his acrylic painting of Canada geese.

Judges for this year’s duck stamp were Jan Martin McGuire, an internationally known wildlife artist; Keith Russell, program manager for urban conservation with Audubon Pennsylvania; Dr. Nathan H. Rice, ornithology collection manager at the Academy of Natural Sciences; John P. Booth, executive director of the Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art; and Sue deLearie Adair, an artist, birder and avid naturalist.

A gallery of all the contest entries can be viewed on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Flickr page.

Isaac Schreiber 12, of Duffield, Va, was named the winner of the Junior Duck Stamp competition with his acrylic painting of trumpeter swans.

A Junior Duck Stamp is chosen each year from entries made by students from across the United States and Puerto Rico. This year’s winner is Isaac Schreiber, 12, of Duffield, Va., who painted a pair of trumpeter swans.

Second place went to Daniel Billings, 16, of Gallatin, Mont., for his oil painting of a wood duck. Rene Christensen, 17, of Nekoosa, Wis., took third place with her graphite rendition of a pair of Canada geese.

The junior contest is part of an educational program about wetlands, waterfowl and conservation efforts. Proceeds from sales of the $5 Junior Duck Stamps are used to support youth education.

A gallery of the “best of show” winners can be seen on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Flickr page.

Both the regular and junior stamps can be purchased at many national wildlife refuges, sporting goods stores and related retailers and through the U.S. Postal Service. For information, check out the “Buy Duck Stamps” website.