Category Archives: Humor

Amusing Monday: Baby river otters must be taught how to swim

Baby river otters appear to be reluctant swimmers when they enter the water for the very first time. As you can see in the first video, the mother otter pulls, pushes and practically wrestles her offspring to begin a swim lesson at Columbus Zoo in Ohio.

The second video, from Oregon Zoo in Portland, features otter keeper Becca VanBeek, who provides us some details about the life of a young otter. Shown is a baby otter named Molalla. The mom seems a bit rough with her baby, but she’s just trying to teach a diving and breathing pattern.

If we want to be formal about it, what should we call a baby otter? A baby walrus is called a calf, and a baby sea lion is called a pup. So a baby otter is called a ______? If you said pup, you are right.

Now for the parents. If a male walrus is called a bull and a male sea lion is also called a bull, what is a male otter called? The answer is boar, but please don’t ask me who comes up with this stuff. Correspondingly, female walruses and female sea lions are called cows, while female otters are called sows.

Thirteen kinds of otters exist in the world. Some, such as the sea cat of South America, are so endangered that almost nothing is known about them Read about all 13 on the h2g2 website.

In the Northwest, many people confuse the sea otter with the river otter. Both are related to the weasel, and both have webbed feet and two layers of fur to maintain their body temperature in cold water. But there are many differences:

  • River otters spend more time on land than water. Sea otters almost never climb up on land.
  • River otters live in freshwater and marine estuaries. Sea otters live in seawater, including the ocean.
  • River otters generally grow to 20-25 pounds, sea otters to 50-100 pounds.
  • River otters swim with their bellies down and expose little of their back. Sea otters generally swim belly-up and float high in the water because of air trapped in their fur.
  • River otters have rounded webbed paws, front and back. Sea otters’ rear paws are elongated like flippers with webbing going to the end of the toes.

Sources: Sea Otter Recovery and Aquarium of the Bay

Other otter videos worth watching:

Below is one of the two live cameras in the sea otter exhibit at Seattle Aquarium. The cameras are in operation from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Visit the aquarium’s Otter Cams webpage to see both cams and read about the otters.

Monterey Bay Aquarium also has a live otter cam, which is in operation from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Visit the aquarium’s Sea Otter page for feeding times, when the otters are introduced to the audience and a live discussion takes place with otter experts.

Amusing Monday: Pain and pleasure of the pun

Every year at this time, a unique group of people who share an odd sense of humor venture to Austin, Texas, for the annual O. Henry Pun-Off competition. It has been five years since I’ve reported on this event — probably because the contest attracts so many people who believe they are punny, but they’re not.

English poet and essayist Samuel Johnson, who lived during the Revolutionary War, once described puns as “the lowest form of humor.”

Puns remind me of the little girl who had a little curl right in the middle of her forehead. When they are good, they are very, very good. But when they are bad, they are horrid. (See the blog “Destiny-land” for the full poem.)

I’ll tell you more about the O.Henry Pun-Off in a moment, and you can check out the videos on this page. But first let me share a few water-related puns that have been circulating on the Internet for years and are worth repeating, I think.

  1. If we don’t conserve water, we could go from one ex-stream to another.
  2. All the waterfowl kept their eyes closed except for one. He was a Peking Duck.
  3. A friend told me he dug a hole in my backyard and filled it with water. I thought he meant well.
  4. For plumbers, a flush beats a full house.
  5. The building inspector said whoever installed the water pipes was plumb loco.
  6. There was a big paddle sale at the boat store. It was quite an oar deal.
  7. The soundtrack for the killer whale movie was orcastrated.
  8. To spot a glacier, you have to have good ice sight.
  9. What keeps a dock floating above water? Pier pressure.
  10. I used to be a tap dancer until I fell into the sink.

The O. Henry Pun-Off features two types of competitions. In “Punniest of Show,” competitors, sometimes in elaborate costumes, arrive with prepared puns strung together in a story focused on a theme. They have a minute and a half to tell their stories with as many good puns as possible.

In “Punslingers,” two contestants are given a theme as they go on stage. Their goal is to take turns making up puns, going back and forth without repeating any of them. The first punslinger who fails to toss out a pun within a short time is eliminated, while the winner goes on to another round.

The first three videos are the top winners in the “Punniest of Show.” The first features Southpaw Jones, who took second place in the contest. I guess I liked his story the best, because he was quick and talked about all sorts of birds that I could recognize. He edited the original video to count the birds in his talk. (Be sure to go full-screen.)

The second video features Jerzy Gwiazdowski, the first-place winner who takes us across Europe and the Middle East with his word play. The third-place winner, Michael Kohl, has some fun with vegetables.

For an example of “Punslingers,” I’m featuring a semi-final round in which Janani Krishna-Jha goes up against Jerzy Gwiazdowski on the topic of “hair.”

Credit for these videos goes to Brian Combs, who produced them in a way that makes it easy to pick out the various competitions. For all the videos, go to his YouTube website. Winners of both competitions are listed on Facebook under “The O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships.”

John Pollock, a former speechwriter for President Bill Clinton, talks about the anatomy of puns and what it is like to compete in the O. Henry contest in his book “The Pun Also Rises.” Read or listen to a 2011 interview with National Public Radio, which includes an interesting excerpt from the book.

Amusing Monday: Artistic students inspired by endangered species

In celebration of national Endangered Species Day on May 20, students from across the country were invited to create artwork about species that could be headed for extinction. Although the number of entries was somewhat limited, I have been much impressed with more than a few of these pieces.

Chen

The Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest is sponsored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Endangered Species Coalition, Association of Zoos and Aquariums, and International Child Art Foundation. The contest was established to encourage students to learn about threatened and endangered species and to express their understanding and feelings through art.

Yang

Judges included Wyland, the well known marine life artist; Jack Hanna, host of television shows featuring wild animals; David Littschwager, a freelance photographer and contributor to National Geographic magazine; Susan Middleton, a photographer and author who has produced several books of nature photography; and Alice Tangerini, botanical illustrator for the Smithsonian Institution. Entries were submitted in February and March.

Sharonin

The painting of Southern Resident Killer Whales was created by 17-year-old Christopher Chen of Oak Grove, Calif. The artwork was named a semifinalist in the endangered species art contest. Of course, those of us who live in the Puget Sound area are at least somewhat familiar with the three pods of Southern Resident orcas, a population listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. See NOAA’s Species in the Spotlight.

Seven-year-old Rachel Yang of Belmont, Calif., was named the winner among a much younger group of students, those in the kindergarten-to-second-grade division. Her picture of yelloweye rockfish should also spark interest for Puget Sound residents, as these fish are listed as threatened in the Puget Sound region. See NOAA’s “Rockfish in Puget Sound/Georgia Basin.”

Kiernicki

The picture of Atlantic salmon, third on this page, by Katrina Sharonin, 12, took first place among the sixth through eight graders. I thought the hourglass was an important element, something to show that the species may be running out of time. Although we think of Atlantic salmon as farmed fish on the West Coast, remnant populations of wild Atlantic salmon can still be found in central and eastern Maine. Once abundant along the East Coast, Atlantic salmon are now one of the most endangered species in the U.S. See NOAA’s Species in the Spotlight. By the way, Katrina is another student from Belmont, Calif., which had a large number of excellent entries.

Lei

Elizabeth Kiernicki, 17, of Pingree Grove, Ill., was the first-place winner among the students in grades 9 through 12 with her picture of the northern spotted owl. The spotted owl, listed as threatened, was once found in forests from Southwest British Columbia through Western Washington and Western Oregon and as far south as San Francisco Bay. Now, remnant populations are in decline in scattered areas, primarily remaining segments of old-growth forests, while a significant population survives on the Olympic Peninsula. See U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service webpage.

Chang

Other semifinalists include Matthew Lei, 11, of Portland, Ore., with his portrait of a mother gray whale and her calf, and Michelle Chang, 7, of Centrevile, Va., with her picture of a mother polar bear and her cub waiting on a chunk for broken ice.

To see all the semifinalists, visit the Flikr page showing semifinalists or you can scan through all the entries by going to the Flikr page organized by grade level.

Endangered Species Day will be celebrated with events organized by groups around the country. You can find registered events on the webpage “Celebrate Endangered Species Day,” although you may need to do an Internet search for details.

It’s not hard to find information about the Endangered Species Act or individual species with an Internet search engine, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service gives you a place to start with its Endangered Species Day website.

Endangered Species Day was designated by U.S. Senate resolution in 2006 to encourage teachers across the country to spend at least 30 minutes “informing students about threats to, and the restoration of, endangered species around the world” and to encourage organizations and business to help produce educational materials.

As far as I can tell, a 2012 Senate resolution was the last time that Congress officially recognized Endangered Species Day, although it has continued with the support of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Amusing Monday: Entering the world of
a top ocean predator

I was quite impressed when I watched this video of a diver cutting away a thick rope that had been slicing into the flesh of a massive whale shark. The animal, spotted 300 miles southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, remained calm throughout the operation.

Daniel Zapata, dive team leader aboard the Solmar V cruise ship, said the divers knew it might be dangerous to cut the whale shark free, but it was heartbreaking for them to watch while the animal was suffering.

“We talked about it for some time between dives,” Zapata said in a question-and-answer interview with Joanna McNamara of Project Aware. “When we saw the whale shark again, I knew I had to help. It felt so good to cut this whale shark free. I found a thinner section of the rope and cut through it. I unwrapped the rope from each side of the whale shark and finally she was free.”

The action may have saved the life of the pregnant female and her unborn offspring, according to observers.

This video was featured on the Smithsonian Channel as part of the latest series “Secrets of Shark Island.” The “secret,” according to promotional material, is that the Revillagigedo Islands, some 200 miles from the Mexican coast, is home to one of the greatest concentrations of fish in the world.

“This is the only natural juncture for miles in an otherwise empty Pacific Ocean and a crucial area for migrating sharks and other apex predators,” states the Smithsonian Channel website. “Enter a world where whitetip sharks, giant lobsters and moray eels share living quarters, humpback whales breed, and mantas and tuna feast on bait in this land of plenty.”

The Smithsonian Channel has been going a little crazy over sharks the past few years. But it isn’t just about sharks. It’s about the people who love them. Two years ago, we were introduced to “Shark Girl” aka Madison Steward, who grew up around sharks on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef and is as fearless as they come around the sharp-toothed creatures. See second video on this page.

“Sharks are misunderstood like no other creature, to the point where it is actually contributing to their slaughter,” Madison told Gerri Miller of Mother Nature Network. “I think it has a lot to do with media, but also that people cannot go and see them for themselves and learn the truth.

“Sharks are NOT what you think,” she continued, “and myself and many other people spend hours in the water with large sharks and feed them at ease on regular occasions. They are the apex predators, and nature doesn’t make animals like this for no reason. They are essential in our oceans. In previous years, the decimation of the shark population has caused the surrounding ecosystem to collapse. They are truly the ‘boss’ of our oceans.”

The third video is something of a personal manifesto from Madison Stewart, spoken in a voice-over as she swims in an awe-inspiring underwater world with ethereal music playing in the background.

If you think you know sharks, take a quiz from MNN.

Want to see more amazing sharks and stories from people involved with them? Check out these videos from Smithsonian Channel:

“Secrets of Shark Island” series

“Shark Girl” series

“Death Beach” series

“Great White: Code Red” series

“Hunt for the Super Predator” series

Also, “Shark Girl” Madison Stewart has produced some fine videos since she was 14 years old. Watch them on the Madison Stewart website, “Good Youth in a Bad Sea.”

Amusing Monday: New stamps to mark national parks centennial

UPDATE: April 28, 2016

The U.S. Postal Service today released an image of the “pane” of National Park stamps that will become available for purchase on June 2. (Click image below to enlarge.) People may mistakenly call this group of stamps a “sheet,” but a sheet is actually much larger — usually nine panes as they come off a printing press.

Centennial sheet photo

Four of the images on the 16 National Park stamps were provided by the National Park Service. They are the oil-on-canvas painting “Scenery in the Grand Tetons” by Albert Bierstadt (first row, second from right); the chromolithograph-on-canvas “Grand Canyon of Arizona from Hermit Rim Road” by Thomas Moran (second row, far left); the three-masted, steel-hulled, square-rigged ship Balclutha, which can be seen at San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park (third row, far left); and the pastel-on-paper “Administration Building, Frijoles Canyon” by Helmuth Naumer Sr. (fourth row, far left).

Images on the other stamps are the work of independent photographers, and the center of the pane comes from a 1-cent stamp of Yosemite National Park issued in 1934.
—–

To celebrate the National Park Service’s 100th anniversary, the U.S. Postal Service has commissioned 16 new Forever stamps with scenes from 16 different national parks.

Rainier

The first-day issue ceremony will take place June 2 in New York City as part of the World Stamp Show NY-2016, an international event for stamp collectors held once every 10 years. Related events are planned in or near the national parks depicted on the stamps.

“These stamps celebrate the 100th anniversary of the National Parks and depict the beauty and diversity of these national treasures,” Postmaster General Megan J. Brennan said in a news release. “They serve as an inspiration for Americans to visit, learn and to write cherished memories of their trips to these incredible wonders.”

Jonathan B. Jarvis, director of the National Park Service, added, “This set of stamps will take people on a journey to some of the most amazing places in the world. We are thrilled that the 16 national park stamps issued in ’16 for the centennial depict the variety of parks that collectively tell the story of our country.”

The star-trail photo of Mount Rainier, the first stamp on this page, was taken by Matt Dieterich of Pittsburgh, Penn., who worked as an intern in the National Park Service’s Geoscientist-in-the-Parks program.

“This night was one I will never forget,” said Dieterich, quoted in a news release. “After working with visitors at the Mount Rainier astronomy program on June 22, 2015, I noticed there was an aurora, so I drove down to Reflection Lake to capture it. The location was perfect as it contained a view of Mount Rainier and water for reflections.

“To create this star trails image, I took 200 photos in a two-hour window between 2 a.m. and 4 a.m. with my Nikon D750 and 24mm lens set at F/1.4 and ISO 5000. Since the Earth is rotating, each 8-sec. exposure shows stars at slightly different locations. When the photos are combined into one image, the stars create a circular pattern around the North Star, which is just out of view at the top of the image.

“The pink aurora spread throughout the background sky. Mountaineers can be seen with their white headlamps climbing Mount Rainier on the right side of the volcano.”

Glacier

The photo of Glacier Bay was taken by Tom Bean of Flagstaff, Ariz. Glacier Bay National Park encompasses 3.3 million acres of mountains, glaciers and coastlines in Alaska.

To see the full set of stamps, go to the National Park Service page for Centennial Stamps. The following list will take you to a description of each stamp by the Postal Service. For a better image of the stamp, click on “PDF” in the upper right corner of the page below the headline.

Amusing Monday: Dubai Fountain is a wondrous artform on a big lake

The Dubai Fountain, located on the 30-acre Burj Lake in downtown Dubai, is the largest choreographed fountain system in the world.

The amazing fountains combine music with the varying motion of water and lights to create a three-dimensional moving sculpture. The Dubai Fountain was created by WET Design, a California-based company that dreamed up the Bellagio fountains in Las Vegas.

The video above was shot with five high-definition cameras from various angles. Be sure to watch it in full screen.

Some of the water jets in the Dubai Fountain can shoot water up to 450 feet in the air, which is the height of a 45-story building, according to a website sponsored by the nearby Dubai Mall in the United Arab Emirates. Two central arcs and five circles of varying sizes span out 900 feet. Up to 22,000 gallons of water can hang in the air at any moment.

The fountain, completed in 2010, was said to cost $217 million, according to various sources.

The fountains perform twice each afternoon with evening shows every half hour. Music ranges from contemporary Arabic to classical to pop music.

One could look at these fountains as an exercise in extravagance, like just about everything in Dubai, but I think I would really enjoy seeing this massive water feature in action.

Amusing Monday: Birds prepare nests, while Eastern eaglets go live

I usually wait until June to post some of the best views of wildlife you will ever see, because that is when the animal kingdom seems to really become active. But this year I thought we could show up a little sooner and see what happens on live wildlife cameras in early spring.

Especially amusing are a pair of bald eagle chicks hatched about three weeks ago in a poplar tree in the U.S. National Arboretum in Washington, D.C. Their parents, who began nesting in this location two years ago, were named “Mr. President” and “The First Lady.”

Go to WASHINGTON, D.C., LIVE EAGLE NEST CAM for the live video, since embedded videos are not allowed. The video on this page shows the hatching of the first chick at about 5 minutes in, when the adult eagle stands up and moves to the side.

Officials involved in the project are entertaining names for the two eaglets. Suggestions can be offered on the Facebook page of either the American Eagle Foundation or the U.S. Department of Energy and Environment, as described in a news release on the project.

The nesting site contains a pair of cameras that operate 24 hours a day. You can easily switch from one camera to the other for better viewing at different times.

American Eagle Foundation, which operates the camera with permission from the U.S. government, makes this statement on its Eagle Nest Cam web page:

“This is a wild eagle nest and anything can happen. While we hope that two healthy juvenile eagles will end up fledging from the nest this summer, things like sibling rivalry, predators, and natural disaster can affect this eagle family and may be difficult to watch.”

Two ospreys, known as Tom and Audrey, are back at their nesting site on Maryland’s eastern shore, where Chesapeake Conservancy does a great job with its osprey cam. I’m no expert, but it looks like a lot of nest-building activity at the moment. Make sure your sound is on, as there seems to be considerable vocalization.

We need to wait a little longer for the ospreys to arrive at two locations where the University of Montana operates live osprey cameras as part of its Montana Osprey Project. They are at the Hellgate Canyon nest site in Missoua and Dunrovin Ranch in Lolo. According to the project’s Facebook page, the ospreys are on their way and should arrive soon (based on satellite tracking).

I was disappointed to hear that an osprey cam operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife in Gig Harbor is offline this year. WDFW posted this note on the website: “This camera is out of alignment and now offline for 2016. Ospreys have nested and we cannot disturb them to repair or re-angle the camera.”

Alberta Conservation Association and its sponsors last year set up cameras to observe three prime nesting boxes for peregrine falcons in Edmonton, Alberta. Chicks hatched in each of the nests, where we could watch the mothers taking care of their little bundles of fluff, all in real time. The message on the website says, “It’s not long now.”

One of my favorite live cams is still Pete’s Pond (video player at right), a watering hole on Mashatu Game Reserve in Botswana, Africa. It began as a National Geographic project and is now operated by WildEarth, which features several other wildlife cams. Operators, working remotely, turn the camera to find the best action at any moment.

I’ve started watching a live camera in a cove at Anacapa Island in Channel Islands National Park in Southern California. Nearly 1,000 marine species live in the area, and often fish and tiny swimming creatures come into view of the camera.

The Vancouver Aquarium has live cams showing:

As spring moves into summer, other wildlife cams will be worth watching, including the brown bears in Katmai National Park in Alaska, where the action at Brooks River usually begins in July.

I’ve featured other wildlife cams in past years. Check out Water Ways for June 23, 2014 as well as June 17, 2013.

Amusing Monday: Colbert talks drugs with Sammy the Salmon

Stephen Colbert: “Environmental scientists — this is true — have tested salmon in the Puget Sound out around Seattle. And they found that, because those salmon are near all these wastewater-treatment plants, the salmon are full of drugs, including Prozac. I don’t blame them, because if I spent all my life living in wastewater, I would definitely need a mood stabilizer.”

Stephen Colbert dedicated a portion of his “Late Show” with a humorous take on a recent scientific report about how drugs are passing through people’s bodies and ending up in Puget Sound, where they can affect fish, including salmon. This video has been viewed about 216,000 times since it was posted last Tuesday.

In the four-minute video, Colbert goes on to have a conversation with Sammy the Salmon, who seems clearly affected by the drugs he has been consuming.

On the serious side, you can read about the study from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in a Kitsap Sun story by reporter Tristan Baurick. Tristan’s story inspired me to write a “Water Ways” post about one possible solution being studied: building enhanced treatment processes into existing wastewater plants.

In other humorous news, perhaps you’ve seen the new SeaWorld commercial called “The new future of SeaWorld.” The ad promotes SeaWorld’s decision to quit breeding killer whales and to halt its theatrical shows with orcas but not to move them out of their tanks. Recall Water Ways, March 17.

PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, quickly posted a parody that you can watch in the second video player on this page.

If SeaWorld Ads Told The Truth

What if SeaWorld's new commercial told the truth? "Because you know what whales hate? The ocean." #LOL

Posted by PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) on Tuesday, March 29, 2016

One other bit of humor came out in print last week as an April Fool’s joke from the Center for Biological Diversity. Here’s a quick sample from “Endangered Earth online.”

  • “The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this week confirmed rumors that the comb-over wilderness atop the pate of presidential contender Donald J. Trump is indeed “critical habitat” for more than 300 endangered species.”
  • “The Center’s innovative ‘Take Extinction Off Your Plate’ campaign — aimed at reducing meat consumption for the sake of people’s and the planet’s health — announced today it would be baking 10,000 kale-lentil muffins and delivering them to needy gray wolves across the West.”
  • “The Center went to federal court this week to challenge the Environmental Protection Agency’s recent finding that smooth jazz is ‘perfectly safe’ for people and wildlife.”

Amusing Monday: Short videos tell timely tales of scientific discovery

Our old friend the northern clingfish, whose belly can clamp onto things and hold tighter than a suction cup, is the star in an award-winning movie put together by researchers and students at the University of Washington.

It’s only a three-minute movie, but the story of this intriguing little fish captured the attention of 37,000 middle school students from 17 different countries in the Ocean 180 Video Challenge. This is a competition that encourages ocean scientists to share their discoveries through short videos. Students selected the clingfish video as the best in the amateur category after an initial screening by a panel of scientists and communication experts.

You can watch all the video finalists on the Ocean 180 YouTube channel. On this page, you can watch the clingfish video, “A Very Sticky Fish,” as well as one called “Harbor Seal Pups: Diving into Rehab,” which was judged the winner in the professional category, since it was produced with the help of a professional filmmaker.

Second place was awarded to “The Creative Dolphin: What Dolphins Do When Asked to Vary Their Behavior.” Third place went to “Marine Defaunation: Animal Loss in the Global Ocean.” An honorable mention was given to “The JetYak.”

The UW team included Adam Summers, professor of biology and of aquatic and fishery sciences at Friday Harbor Laboratories, along with Ian Stevens, a 2015 English graduate, and Zack Bivins, a current English major. I featured Adam Summers and his studies of the clingfish in an “Amusing Monday” post last May. See Water Ways, May 11, 2015, and Michelle Ma’s original story for UW News.

The UW undergraduates met in 2014 while reading “Moby Dick” in professor Richard Kenney’s English class at Friday Harbor Laboratories, where science is mixed with the humanities. Stevens and Bivens produced a 10-minute video about a sperm whale, called “The Sperm Whale and You,” and Summers encouraged them to enter the video contest. They clamped onto Summers’ research paper on the clingfish and decided that would be their topic.

The project was entirely optional, driven only by the students’ passion for art and science.

“This is the intellectual life at its magnesium heat,” Kenney told Michelle Ma in her latest news release. “They were doing it for fun. That’s how you win; it starts with excitement and passion.”

“It is pretty cool for a couple of UW English majors to waltz into a national science outreach film competition and take top honors,” Summers said. “I think it points to the excellent training these students received on campus and also their ability to exploit the intellectual hothouse of Friday Harbor Labs.”

The student winners are forming a video production company that might make more films to explain science in a visually interesting way. Next time, they could enter the Ocean 180 contest as professionals.

The competition, sponsored by the Florida Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence, challenges scientists to bring their research papers to life in ways that can help people find meaning to their work. Entries must be tied to a specific research paper published in the past five years.

First-place winners, amateur and professional, each received $3,000. Second- and third- place winners received $2,000 and $1,000 respectively.

Students judging the finalists in the competition came from classes in which teachers signed up specific classrooms to watch the videos. Assuming the competition continues, classroom registration will begin in the fall.

For information, go to the Ocean 180 website.

Amusing Monday: What kind of animal are you?

I am a great blue heron, according to the “Wildlife Personality Quiz” by the National Wildlife Foundation. I accept this identity, which resulted from answering eight questions about my personal choices and lifestyles.

Heron

About halfway through the quiz, I got the feeling that my habits might line up with those of the great blue heron. Don’t ask me why my brain went in that direction. To my surprise, when I finished the questions, a picture of a heron popped up.

It’s fun to take this quiz, but it isn’t as complex or comprehensive as I had hoped. I went back and changed a few of my answers and still came out as a great blue heron.

I then chose answers that were basically opposite of my original honest replies. This time, I came out as a mountain lion. Again, that is probably a pretty good approximation of the opposite of what I’m like. Although I admire the big cats, and I actually am a Cougar (having graduated from Washington State University), I would nearly always choose the water’s edge over the mountain tops.

The quiz was posted last week as part of National Wildlife Week, declared by NWF. If you have time, take the quiz. As always, I welcome any comments.