Category Archives: Art

Amusing Monday: Artistic students inspired by endangered species

In celebration of Endangered Species Day on May 19, more than 1,400 students from across the country submitted their artwork showing threatened and endangered plants and animals. The contest is under the direction of the Endangered Species Coalition.

“Protecting nature is critical to keeping our planet thriving for future generations,” states an introduction to the art contest. “What better way to do that than by engaging youth to put their imaginative skills to work for wildlife in the 2017 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest.”

Art by Rajvi Bhavin Shah, 7, of Roseville, Calif.
Image: Endangered Species Coalition

The annual contest is open to any student from kindergarten to 12th grade. I have to say that I’m always surprised at how environmentally oriented competitions attract young artists able to express themselves in interesting ways.

One of my favorite pieces in the endangered species contest is a drawing of a mother polar bear and her cub on patches of ice — the first picture on this page. The artist is 7-year-old Rajvi Bhavin Shah of Roseville, Calif., who was able to bring a unique artistic style to a scene used before.

Polar bears, by the way, are the first vertebrate species to be formally declared at risk of extinction because of climate change. One of the primary concerns for their survival is a loss of sea ice, essential for their hunting of seals.

Art by Ryan Ng, 13, of Belmont, Calif.
Image: Endangered Species Coalition

The second picture, by 13-year-old Ryan Ng of Belmond, Calif., shows a group of Alabama red-belly turtles, which were listed as endangered in 1987 when it became clear that significant predation of both adult turtles and their eggs is driving the species toward extinction.

The grand-prize winner is another 7-year-old. The judges really liked the portrayal of the rusty-patched bumble bees by Sanah Nuha Hutchins of Washington, D.C. Rusty-patched bumble bees were historically found in the grasslands and tallgrass prairies of the Upper Midwest and Northeast, but the bees declined as their habitats were converted to farms and housing developments.

Art by Sanah Nuha Hutchins, 7, of Washington, D.C. // Image: Endangered Species Coalition

Judges for this year’s competition included marine life artist Wyland; Jack Hanna, host of Jack Hanna’s Into the Wild; David Littschwager, freelance photographer and contributor to National Geographic magazine; Susan Middletown, a photographer who has collaborated with Littschwager and whose own work has been published in four books; and Alice Tangerini, botanical illustrator for the Smithsonian Institution.

The contest is organized by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Endangered Species Coalition, Association of Zoos and Aquariums and International Child Art Foundation.

One can see the winning artworks on the webpage of the Endangered Species Coalition. To see all 40 semi-finalists, you can scan through the coalition’s Flickr page. A higher level page shows the semi-finalists organized by grade level along with previous years’ semifinalists.

New game lets you travel with wacky steelhead as they try to survive

In a new game open to everyone, 48 colorful cartoon fish will soon follow the wandering paths of real-life steelhead that have been tracked during their migration through Puget Sound.

Just like their counterparts in the real world, some of the young steelhead in the game will survive the trip from South Puget Sound or southern Hood Canal — but many will not. The game’s basic tenet is to choose a fish that you feel will be lucky or cunning enough to make it through a gauntlet of hazards from predators to disease. You then watch and learn about the needs and threats to salmon and steelhead as the game progresses over 12 days, beginning May 8.

The educational game, called Survive the Sound, was developed by Long Live the Kings. Each fish you enter will cost $25, with proceeds going to the organization. Long Live the Kings has long been known for its work in rebuilding wild salmon and steelhead populations and researching the needs and threats to these amazing migratory fish.

“I’ve seen some of these migration paths of steelhead,” said Lucas Hall of Long Live the Kings. “Some take some wacky paths, and some even turn around and go the wrong direction for a while.”

As I said, the cartoon fish are based on a select group of real-life fish. Each fish has a home base, either the Nisqually or the Skokomish river, and the size of the real fish is listed. Where the game departs from real life is that the fish are given funny names, and each fish is quoted with a phrase that it might say.

A fish called Itchy Roe is dressed as a baseball player and says, “Swimming this gauntlet is still better than playing in Cleveland.”

Another fish is named Call Me Fishtail, and he says, “Uncharted truth: it is not down in any map; true places never are” — a line from the novel Moby Dick.

The there is Sci-Fi: “This migration is one small step for fish, one giant leap for fish-kind.”

The original tracking effort is conducted by implanting tiny acoustic transmitters into young fish. Receivers placed along the migratory route pick up transmissions that identify the specific fish. If a little steelhead gets eaten by a seal or a bird, researchers may find themselves tracking the predator until the transmitter is excreted.

The idea for the game came up during a board meeting of Long Live the Kings, Lucas told me. Someone mentioned that it would be intriguing to have a Fantasy Football game for fish with winners and losers, as in the real world of salmon and steelhead. The game is now six months into development.

“We’re trying to tell a story in a way that people can understand,” Lucas said.

People may purchase any number of fish for themselves or gift them to others. Prizes will be awarded in several categories. For details, go to the FAQ page on the game’s website. If your fish dies, you will still get updates on the migration along with other ongoing information.

The game is linked to the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project, an international effort involving more than 60 groups in the U.S. and Canada that are attempting to explain why so few salmon and steelhead grow up to spawn as adults. Among the project’s supporters is the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. Vulcan Inc., founded by Allen, helped with the design and user interface for the game.

KUOW reporter Ellis O’Neill visited Big Beef Creek on the Kitsap Peninsula to see how the steelhead are implanted with acoustic tags. She also spoke with Seattle attorney Ryan McFarland and his 8-year-old son Dylan, who will be playing the game. Hear her report below, followed by a video story told by reporter Allison Morrow of KING-5 television.

Listen to “2017-04-26-steelhead” on Spreaker.

Amusing Monday: Ocean trash is still attached to art and education

Trashy art is getting better and better. Some years ago, people started transforming debris found on the beach into sculptures worthy of an art show. Now the trashy art has gotten so good that we can actually attend an art exhibit where trashy sculptures are on display.

Called “Washed Ashore Exhibits,” one group of sculptures has been placed in an ongoing display at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

A traveling exhibit will open at Tacoma’s Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium beginning next week and continue until Oct. 21. I don’t believe the pictures on this page or in the photo gallery of sculptures on the Washed Ashore website truly capture the effect of seeing these large sculptures up close.

Of course, the whole idea is to raise awareness about marine debris, most of which begins with a careless discard of trash — although some of the interesting items were probably lost by accident. Regardless of the source, these plastics and other materials don’t belong in the ocean, where they can harm sea life in various ways, from ingestion to entrapment. Such debris also turns our beaches into a trash dump.

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Amusing Monday: Artist goes to water and to ice to make giant portraits

Sean Yoro, a Hawaiian-born artist, paints landscapes — or should I say he paints on the landscape, often taking great risks.

Sean, who goes by the name Hula, has stood on a surfboard to paint at the edge of a waterfall. He has paddled among Arctic icebergs to create his art. And he has worked for days on the watery undersides of bridges, painted the hull of an old ship and rendered images on many other man-made structures that impose on the natural world.

What he most often paints are visually stunning murals of human faces and forms — mostly women — on a huge scale.

His latest project, called Maka’u, found him precariously standing on his paddle board at the edge of a high man-made waterfall. His picture shows a female subject deep in the water and clinging to a rope to avoid being swept over the spillway. Check out the first video on this page.

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Amusing Monday: Ray Troll visits Puget Sound with Ratfish Wranglers

Ray Troll and the Ratfish Wranglers, one of the most amusing bands in the Pacific Northwest, is touring Western Washington this month, with stops in Port Townsend, Gig Harbor and Seattle.

Two years ago, when writing about how fishermen can save rockfish from barotrauma, I featured a video by Ray and the band in Water Ways (June 22, 2015). This video includes a rockfish puppet and an original rap song by Ray Troll and Russell Wodehouse telling all about the problem.

Besides music, Ray is well known for his “fin art,” which is mostly about fish of all kinds, especially salmon. Ray prides himself on the realistic images of fish, produced with scientific precision, which he combines with humor to create some edgy posters.

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Amusing Monday: New steelhead license plate enhanced by inspiration

plate

Washington Department of Licensing has embraced a stylistic work of art in its new steelhead license plate, which became available for purchase last week.

The new license plate, which focuses on the eye and head of a steelhead trout, is an obvious departure from previous wildlife license plates that feature realistic images of animals. Derek DeYoung, the artist who created the new plate, specializes in what he calls abstract paintings of fish faces and flanks, as well as whole fish. The original steelhead painting is called “Abstract Steelhead — Horizon Eye.”

Derek, based in Livingston, Mont., is a rare combination of expressive artist and skilled angler.

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Amusing Monday: Young artists examine problem of trash in the ocean

A free 2017 calendar, published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, features winning artwork in a contest that focuses on the problem of trash in the ocean, otherwise known as marine debris.

Art by Sallie S., a seventh grader from Washington state Courtesy of NOAA
By Sallie S., a seventh grader from Washington state
All pictures on this page courtesy of NOAA

More than 700 students from around the country participated in the contest, and one of the 13 winners was a seventh grader from Washington state named Sallie S. Neither her full name nor hometown was disclosed, and I never received a response to an email sent to her on my behalf by NOAA officials.

Sallie’s statement on the back of the calendar: “Marine debris impacts our oceans and Great Lakes, because the plastic and other garbage could badly injure or kill the sea animals. What I will do to keep our ocean debris free is to not litter. Not littering is very important, because if you litter the debris can go into drains, then it can go into the lake or the sea. Then once it goes in the sea, ocean organisms could then die.”

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Amusing Monday: On location with music for a warming Arctic Ocean

As chunks of the Wahlenbergbreen glacier break off and crash into the sea next to him, Italian pianist and composer Ludovico Einaudi plays on, performing a piece he wrote for this moment.

As seen in this video, Einaudi’s piano is situated on a floating platform surrounded by small pieces of floating ice. He came to Norway this past June on the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise to make a statement about the need to protect the Arctic Ocean. The composition, “Elegy for the Arctic,” fits the time and place.

“The ice is constantly moving and creating,” he told Sara Peach, a writer for Yale Climate Connections. “Every hour there is a different landscape. Walls of ice fall down into the water and they create big waves.”

Because of global warming, the Arctic is losing its ice, changing this remote ecosystem. Environmentalists are concerned about the increasing exploitation of minerals and fish in this fragile region. Greenpeace is among the groups pushing for international protections.

Supporting the cause, Einaudi performed with his grand piano on an artificial iceberg, 33 feet by 8.5 feet, made of 300 triangles of wood attached together.

“Being here has been a great experience,” he said in a Greenpeace news release issued at the time. “I could see the purity and fragility of this area with my own eyes and interpret a song I wrote to be played upon the best stage in the world. It is important that we understand the importance of the Arctic, stop the process of destruction and protect it.”

“If you haven’t heard the music of Ludovico Einaudi, then it’s probably because you don’t know it’s by Ludovico Einaudi,” writes Tim Jonze, music editor for The Guardian. “For years, his muted piano music has been stealthily soundtracking TV shows and adverts, seeping into our collective consciousness while the mild-mannered Italian behind it stayed out of the limelight.”

He has written songs for numerous soundtracks, including the trailer for “The Black Swan.” He has collaborated with other artists in theater, video and dance. Besides a long list of albums, his credits include multiple television commercials in Europe and the U.S.

In March, Einaudi released a music video, “Fly,” for Earth Hour (second video on this page). In my annual story about Earth Hour, I noted that the event may be losing its appeal in the U.S. but is still going strong in other countries. See Water Ways, March 16.

In the third video on this page, Einaudi discusses his latest project, an album titled “Elements.”

Amusing Monday: Art within a soap bubble

It begins with secret formulas for bubble solution, takes off with personal creativity and becomes an entertaining show with smoke, lights and music. They call it bubble art.

The first video shows Melody Yang, who has been performing bubble art since the age of 3 as the youngest member of the performing Yang family. Her father, Fan Yang, studied the science of bubbles and found new ways to blow bubbles to create works of art. He started the troupe called the Gazillion Bubble Show, which performs in New York City. Check out other videos from the show.

For his continually expanding and multiplying bubbles, Fan claims to have broken the Guinness Book of World Records 16 times. I found him as the current record holder of the longest bubble wall, nearly 167 feet long. See Guinness World Records website.

Melody has now followed in the footsteps of her parents, uncle and brother. She has performed on television in Italy, Greece, France and the U.S., including an appearance on the Queen Latifah Show.

Another bubble artist is Su Chung Tai, shown in the second video on this page. I found him listed as the current world record holder for the most bubble domes created inside one another, a total of 12, and the most soap bubbles successfully blown inside a larger soap bubble, a total of 779.

Su started working with bubbles in 2011 and has become a celebrity in Taiwan and other areas in Asia. He calls his show “Be Fantasy: The Joy of Bubble.”

One more bubble artist is Javier Urbina, a Spanish actor, director and theater producer known as “The Lord of the Bubbles.” Since 2014, he has performed more than 250 bubble shows in Spain and Mexico.

Amusing Monday: At Long Beach, people are really high on kites

Kites of all shapes and sizes have become common features at beaches all over the world, and an annual event at Long Beach on the Washington Coast is billed as the largest kite festival in the U.S.

The Washington State International Kite Festival, Aug. 15-21, is a weeklong event where people get to show off their kites and compete in aerial displays and downright battles that engage one acrobatic kite against another.

The American Kitefliers Association has organized daily “mass ascensions,” in which at least 100 kites of the same style take to the skies. Sport kite competitions involve kites flying in intricate patterns or dancing to music.

“It’s quite a rainbow of expression,” John Barresi. editor of Kite Life magazine, told reporter Terri Gleich in a story published July 22 in the Kitsap Sun.

“Part of my world,” John said, “is sharing kites with people who say, ‘Oh yeah, I remember I tried to fly a kite and I couldn’t.’ A kite that is well made will fly itself. People will be amazed at how easy it can be.”

The videos on this page give you an idea of the diversity of the kites. Miniature kites — some as small as one inch — can be viewed up close, and nobody can miss the giant kites, which can be up to 20 feet wide and 100 feet long. The precision and art of construction is part of the show.

Fighting kites involve the traditional Japanese Rokkaku kites, which are six-sided and designed for quick response, as well as smaller fighter kites. In battle, the goal is to disable an opposing kite or cut its string with abrasive line.

Promotional materials for this year’s festival mention indoor kites that can be flown without any wind at all. Download the complete program (PDF 10.8 mb) for details about the weeklong extravaganza.

An amazing number of kite festivals are held each year throughout the country. For a complete schedule with links to the various festivals, see Event Calendar on the American Kitefliers Association website.

Other videos I found entertaining include: