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Environmental reporter Christopher Dunagan discusses the challenges of protecting Puget Sound and all things water-related.
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Learning to ride on the end of a flying hose

July 23rd, 2014 by cdunagan

Flyboarding, a sport that propels a rider up into the sky on a jet of water, has come to Kitsap County with a local resident who has enthusiastically taken to the sport this summer.

Jerry Johnson of Silverdale takes to the sky above Kitsap Lake on his Flyboard, as boaters stop to watch. Kitsap Sun photo by Larry Steagall

Jerry Johnson of Silverdale takes to the sky at Kitsap Lake on his Flyboard, as boaters watch. / Kitsap Sun photos by Larry Steagall

Dr. Jerry Johnson, a Silverdale orthodontist, tried the sport this spring while vacationing in Mexico, and he thoroughly enjoyed the experience, according to reporter John Becerra Jr., who wrote about it in Monday’s Kitsap Sun.

Johnson came home and located a dealer in Moses Lake who sold him new boots, board, hoses and requisite equipment for about $6,100. He’s been riding over Dyes Inlet and other Kitsap locations ever since.

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Readers of “Amusing Monday” on this blog were introduced to the Flyboard two years ago, after it was demonstrated on Seattle’s Lake Union. Check out: “Amusing Monday: Riding on the end of a flying hose,” which has links to the official website and to videos. Check out the video at the bottom of this page for a full-out demonstration by an expert.

“It’s relatively easy to learn,” Johnson told Becerra. “In the first half hour, you get everyone up out of the water at least, and then you start to get the feel of it. Once you get the feel of it, you can start turning around and stuff. It’s pretty fun.”

A three-hour safety class taught Johnson the basics, including how to safely fall and get back up. The biggest thing, he said, is to avoid the hose and the personal watercraft when falling into the water.

“One of the first moves you learn is to dive in the water and come right back out,” he said. “If you’re starting to fall, its easier to dive in the water and come right back out than to fall on your back and stomach, which hurts.”

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Diving under the water and coming back out is known as the “dolphin dive.” In some videos, you can see a rider go up and down through the waves, a maneuver calling “porpoising” when marine mammals do it.

According to information from the manufacturer, one can go up to 45 feet in the air and up to eight feet underwater. Controlling the Flyboard involves directing the jets of water shooting out of the bottom of the board, and some people acquire special hand-held hoses to increase their maneuverability.

Johnson, who lives near Dyes Inlet between Bremerton and Silverdale, said he draws a crowd when he takes to the sky on a jet of water.

“People just come around,” he said. “All these people come out of their house and just look at you. But that’s kind of a fun thing.”

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"In the end, we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we understand, and we will understand only what we are taught."Baba Dioum, Senegalese conservationist

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