Watching Our Water Ways

Environmental reporter Christopher Dunagan discusses the challenges of protecting Puget Sound and all things water-related.
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Orcas bring excitement to Kitsap shorelines

June 6th, 2013 by cdunagan
A group of eight transient killer whales pass Lions Park Thursday. Kitsap Phone photo by Larry Steagall.

A group of eight transient killer whales pass by Bremerton’s Lions Park Thursday afternoon.
Kitsap Sun photo by Larry Steagall.

I was at my desk Thursday afternoon, tracking down some information for a story, when a call came into the newsroom: Killer whales were passing under Bremerton’s Manette Bridge.

Oh sure, I thought, I’ve heard this type of call before. Although I never fail to check out orca reports, such calls usually lead to what I call a “wild whale chase” with no whales being found. It usually turns out that someone has seen a sea lion resting on the surface with a big flipper sticking up in the air.

A moment later, I got a call at my desk. It was Howard Garrett of Orca Network, who had heard about eight transient killer whales on their way toward Dyes Inlet. He mentioned that marine mammal biologist Brad Hanson was following them in a boat.

My heart skipped a beat, and the rest of my day involved talking about whales, watching whales and writing about whales along with the people watching them. Please check out my story on the Kitsap Sun’s website.

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One Response to “Orcas bring excitement to Kitsap shorelines”

  1. Bill Michel Says:

    Why is it okay for a “Marine Biologist” to follow a pod in a boat but not others? The Orca don’t know the difference. A boat is a boat. These animals have to put up with this nonsense, in the name of science(?) everytime they show up. Better off if the observations are done from the shore.

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