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Glines Canyon Dam shows off its new notches

October 7th, 2011 by cdunagan

“Deconstruction” of Glines Canyon Dam on the Elwha River appears to be progressing rapidly. A fourth notch in the dam was completed yesterday, and water is now pouring through all four of the gaps.

Alan Durning of Sightline Institute (blog) pieced together the video, at right, from still photos taken by a remote webcam at the dam. Check out the cameras on the Elwha River Restoration Project webpage.

Work will continue on the removal of both Elwha and Glines Canyon dam until the end of this month, when a “fish window” will shut down operations on the water. Work will shift to demolition of penstocks, powerhouses and other structures — work that will not release sediment into the river, according to the Elwha Blog provided by Olympic National Park. Construction in the water can resume at the end of the year.

At the Elwha Dam, contractors are blasting away to remove the left spillway foundation down into bedrock to form the downstream end of a diversion channel. The diversion channel is scheduled to be put into operation the week of Oct. 17, when the river will flow through the channel at an increased rate, drawing down Lake Aldwell.

Elwha Dam / Olympic National Park webcam

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One Response to “Glines Canyon Dam shows off its new notches”

  1. cdunagan Says:

    Rocky Barker of the Idaho Statesman in Boise profiles the Idaho-based company, Superior Blasting of Nampa, which is blasting chunks out of the Elwha Dam. Read his story “Business is booming for Nampa dam-blasting firm” published Saturday.

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