Washington bucks national temperature trend for July

UPDATE, Aug. 14: The planet’s ocean surface temperature was the warmest on record for July, breaking the previous high mark established in 1998, NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center reported today. The combined average global land and ocean surface temperature for July 2009 ranked fifth-warmest since world-wide records began in 1880.

For details go to the NCDC Web site.
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In July, the national average temperature for the contiguous United States was below the long-term average, according to preliminary reports from the National Climatic Data Center.

Precipitation was slightly above average.

<i>July was cooler than normal in the East and warmer in the West, according to the National Climate Date Center </i><br><small>NOAA graphic</small>
July was cooler than normal in the East and warmer in the West, according to the National Climatic Date Center. (Click to enlarge)
NOAA graphic

Given Washington state’s temperatures, which were well above normal, these findings demonstrate that what happens in one region tells you nothing about overall climate change, especially over the short term.

Ohio, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania experienced their coolest July on record, according to the NCDC. Kentucky, Missouri, Wisconsin and Michigan saw their second-coolest July on record, while Minnesota and Tennessee had their third coolest July on record.

At the other extreme, Death Valley, Calif., was at 120 degrees or higher for 22 straight days, beating the old record of 19 straight days.

For the month of July, the temperature at Sea-Tac was 4.2 degrees above average. Several areas in Washington broke the single-day record on July 29.

For the entire month, it was Washington’s ninth warmest July. It was the second-warmest July for Alaska and third-warmest for Arizona.

Precipitation was fairly close to average in most areas — including Washington state, where summers are generally dry. See precipitation map.

3 thoughts on “Washington bucks national temperature trend for July

  1. Sorry, Matthew, but you never seem to be short of interesting things to write about, such as the rain.

    For those who don’t know, Matthew Leach is Kitsap’s own weather man. He writes an informative blog for the Kitsap Sun called Forecasting Kitsap.

  2. UPDATE, Aug. 14: The planet’s ocean surface temperature was the warmest on record for July, breaking the previous high mark established in 1998, NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center reported today. The combined average global land and ocean surface temperature for July 2009 ranked fifth-warmest since world-wide records began in 1880.

    For details go to the NCDC Web site.

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