Adrian named to national team roster

It was a foregone conclusion, but USA Swimming made it official on Tuesday when it released it’s national team roster for 2015-16 which included Bremerton’s Nathan Adrian.

Here’s a link if you want to check out who else made the team and their Twitter handles. All the big names are there (Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte, Missy Franklin, Katie Ledecky, etc.) as well as plenty of fresh new faces. Among them is the only other Washingtonian — Lisa Bratton of Richland.

Adrian, five others, to be face of Coca-Cola for Rio 2016

I reported earlier that Nathan Adrian had recently signed with Coca-Cola as a sponsor.

Nathan Adrian is part of Coca-Cola's One Year Out Rio 2016 advertising campaign. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
Nathan Adrian is part of Coca-Cola’s One Year Out Rio 2016 advertising campaign.
(AP Photo/Bob Leverone)

The Bremerton Olympic champion will now be  part of the company’s special edition Six-Pack of Athletes for its One Year Out campaign for the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. Adrian will represent the sport of swimming. He’s joined by soccer’s Alex Morgan, Paralympic track athlete Tatyana McFadden, track’s Leo Manzano and Ashton Eaton, and gymnast Nastia Liukin. The company says the athletes will be prominently displayed in its packaging, retail and digital advertising.

You can read Coca-Cola’s press release here.

So what does this mean exactly?

That you could find yourself in the possession of a Nathan Adrian can of Coke.

If anyone manages to get one, let me know. I won’t be buying, but I’d still like to check it out.

Gold for Adrian, 4×100 medley relay at worlds

Bremerton's Nathan Adrian, left, celebrates beside France's Fabien Gilot after the US team won the gold medal in the men's 4x100m medley relay final at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia, Sunday. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
Bremerton’s Nathan Adrian, left, celebrates beside France’s Fabien Gilot after the US team won the gold medal in the men’s 4x100m medley relay final at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia, Sunday.
(AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

For the second straight day, Bremerton’s Nathan Adrian helped Team USA to gold, this time in the 4×100 medley relay at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia, Sunday.

The Americans, including Ryan Murphy, Kevin Cordes, and Tom Shields, won in 3 minutes, 29.93 seconds. Australia earned the silver in 3:30.08 and France took the bronze in 3:30.50.

Adrian, swimming the freestyle anchor leg, had a split time of 47.41, but it was Australia’s Cameron McEvoy who was charging hard right next to him and nearly clipped him at the wall. McEvoy’s split was 46.60.

“I saw two great swimmers on either side of me,” Adrian said. “I knew that I was going to have to swim fast to hold them off, especially the last 30 meters.”

“I don’t even know the times. I don’t know what anybody split, really,” Adrian said. “Obviously all four of us did our part, or we wouldn’t be on top of the podium. We had four great swimmers on that relay right there, and we needed four good swims. None of us needed to be great, but we had to have four good swims.

“That’s kind of what I thought to myself and what I told the guys before the race. It’s a relay team. It’s not about any individual performance.”

Two years ago the U.S. was disqualified when Cordes dived in too soon on the breaststroke leg.

Adrian said the medley win was a great way to finish off the meet

“It means a lot,” he said. “We can ride this momentum going into next year and back in the states at US nationals, those guys are swimming fast and it’s exciting. I hope everyone is getting excited.”

Adrian claims silver in 50 free at world championships

France's gold medal winner Florent Manaudou is flanked by Bremerton's silver medal-winner Nathan Adrian, left, and Brazil's bronze medal winner Bruno Fratus during the ceremony for the 50m freestyle final at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia, Saturday. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
France’s gold medal winner Florent Manaudou is flanked by Bremerton’s silver medal-winner Nathan Adrian, left, and Brazil’s bronze medal winner Bruno Fratus during the ceremony for the 50m freestyle final at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia, Saturday. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

 

It wasn’t quite the dominating swim he had in the semifinals, but Bremerton’s Nathan Adrian added to Team USA’s medal count with a silver in the finals of the 50-meter freestyle Saturday at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia.

Adrian also teamed with Ryan Lochte, Simone Manuel and Missy Franklin to win gold in the 4×100 free mixed relay in a world record time of 3 minutes, 23.05 seconds, holding off the Netherlands in 3:23.10 and Canada in 3:23.59.

Adrian’s split was 47.29, his fastest time of the year.

“It was really fun,” Adrian said. “We didn’t have a great vantage point, so I had to keep

The United States mixed 4x100m freestyle relay team from left, Ryan Lochte, Simone Manuel, Nathan Adrian and Missy Franklin, bottom, celebrate after winning the gold medal at the World Championships in Kazan, Russia, Saturday. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
The United States mixed 4x100m freestyle relay team from left, Ryan Lochte, Simone Manuel, Nathan Adrian and Missy Franklin, bottom, celebrate after winning the gold medal at the World Championships in Kazan, Russia, Saturday. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

looking up at the board. Missy did not have the lead until the last meter of that race, so it was really exciting.”

In the 50, Adrian touched the wall in 21.52, right behind world and Olympic champion Florent Manaudou of France in 21.19. Bruno Fratus took the bronze in 21.55. Vladimir Morozov of Russia was fourth in 21.56.

“Sometimes your 50’s clicking, and sometimes your 100’s clicking, and I’m thankful that I had a spot to do both (this week),” Adrian said. “If I had only swum the 100, I would have walked away disappointed. Not to say that I’m not, but it’s nice to come back and get a medal.”

Adrian posted an American record from the semifinal Friday in 21.37, something he’d been gunning for since 2009, but didn’t quite have that time to match Manaudou in the final.

“Yesterday, everything was clicking,” he said. “Today, it was only the swim part. I was just not very good off my start. I didn’t hit the jump or my entry or my breakout as well as I did yesterday. So I’m just trying to work that out and get a little more consistent with that.”

Adrian added he was “definitely happy to get a medal for Team USA.”

Adrian said he knew Manaudou got off the blocks quick and that he was ahead the whole way.

“Oh yeah, he was phenomenal,” Adrian said, adding he could “see him out of the corner of my eye a little bit.”

Adrian has one more race left at this worlds, Sunday’s 4×100 medley relay where he’ll anchor the men’s team.

Adrian sets American record in semifinal of 50 free

Bremerton’s Nathan Adrian produced the world’s fastest time so far this year after dominating the first semifinal Friday of the 50-meter freestyle at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia.

Bremerton's Nathan Adrian celebrates after the first 50-meter freestyle semifinal at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia, Friday. Adrian set an American record in 21.37. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
Bremerton’s Nathan Adrian celebrates after the first 50-meter freestyle semifinal at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia, Friday. Adrian set an American record in 21.37.
(AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

Adrian blew away the rest of the field in 21.37 seconds and set an American record and personal best. The old record was 21.40 by Cullen Jones at the 2007 Worlds in Rome.

Florent Manaudou of France had the second-fastest time in 21.41 followed by Brazil’s Bruno Fratus in 21.60.

Adrian said he felt good going into the race and didn’t want to waste the opportunity so he just “went for it.”

“I wouldn’t want to walk away from this meet knowing I had more in me,” he said in an online interview with Eurosport.com.

He also knows the final will be fast with Manaudou, who Adrian considers the best 50 freestyler in the world, right next to him.

“It’ll be big,” he said. “I have my work cut out for me.”

The finals are Saturday morning local time.

 

Adrian second-fastest qualifier in 50 free semis

Maybe using a bit of frustration as motivation, Bremerton’s Nathan Adrian had the second-fastest qualifying time in the 50-meter freestyle at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia, late Thursday evening.

Adrian won his heat in 21.73 seconds. Florent Manaudou of France was the top qualifier in 21.71 seconds.

Adrian is coming off a disappointing finish in the 100 freestyle on Thursday, where he placed seventh. The semifinals/finals session begins at 7:30 a.m. locally.

Adrian off the podium in 100 free final at worlds championships

On Wednesday, Bremerton’s Nathan Adrian went out too fast in his first 50 meters of the 100 freestyle semifinals and faded in the final 50.

On Thursday, Adrian took a different tact and stayed with the pack in the final, but didn’t have the closing speed and wound up a surprising seventh place at the World Swimming Championships in Kazan, Russia.

Adrian tied with Pieter Timmers of Belgium in 48.31 seconds. Chinese newcomer Zetao Ning won in 47.84, followed by Australia’s Cameron McEvoy in 47.95 and Federico Grabich of Argentina took the bronze, 48.12.

Adrian went out in 23.11 in his opening 50 (he went 22.45 on Wednesday) and came back in 25.20 but it was clear Ning was going to win gold. Ning is the first Chinese male swimmer to win the event at worlds.

Adrian still has another individual event to go, the 50 freestyle, as well as the 400 medley relay. The prelims for the 50 begin at 11:30 p.m. locally Thursday.

AP: Phelps focused on improving in and out of pool

Great read here by Associated Press national writer Paul Newberry (one of my favorites) on Michael Phelps sober journey as he heads toward the U.S. Olympic Trials and the Olympics in Rio a year from now.

 

Michael Phelps practices for the U.S. Swimming Nationals at the Northside Swim Center, Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2015, in San Antonio. Phelps is scheduled to compete in four events. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Michael Phelps practices for the U.S. Swimming Nationals at the Northside Swim Center, Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2015, in San Antonio. Phelps is scheduled to compete in four events. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Michael Phelps is still focused on going fast in the pool.

Outside the water, he’s made some big changes.

The winningest athlete in Olympic history will be competing this week at the U.S. championships in San Antonio — basically, a backup meet for all those American swimmers who didn’t qualify for the world championships in Kazan, Russia.

Actually, Phelps did claim a spot on the team. But, after his second drunken driving arrest last September, USA Swimming issued a six-month suspension and took away his trip to Russia.

“Obviously, I’d like to be competing at worlds,” Phelps said. “But this is what I have to do.”

There were other things he needed to do, as well.

Phelps underwent 45 days of inpatient treatment, enrolled in Alcoholics Anonymous, and decided that he needed to get drinking out of his life, at least in the short term.

“Before I even went to court, I said to myself that I’m not going to drink until after Rio — if I ever drink again,” he said. “That was a decision I made for myself. I’m being honest with myself. Going into 2008 and 2012, I didn’t do that. I didn’t say I was going to take a year off from drinking and not have a drink.”

Phelps, who has won 18 golds and 22 medals overall at the last three Olympics, retired from swimming after the 2012 London Games, saying he had no goals left to accomplish and didn’t want to still be competing into his 30s. That decision lasted barely a year. By the following summer, he was itching to race again.

Now, after enduring another bump in his personal life, he’s determined to end his swimming career on a high note. That means staying clean and sober.

“If I’m going to come back, I need to do this the right way,” Phelps said. “I’ve got to put my body in the best physical shape I can possibly get it in. Is it a challenge? No. I go to bed earlier. I sleep more. I wake up every day and have a completely clear head. I don’t feel like my head went through a brick wall. There are so many positives to it.

“Are there days I’m sitting on the golf course or sitting on my roof (patio) and would like to have a beer? Yeah. But I have a year left in my career. If I really want it bad enough, I will make that sacrifice.”

Phelps is eager to see what kind of times he can post in San Antonio, saying he “has not been in this kind of shape in a long, long time. Maybe not ever.” He’s scheduled to swim four events: the 100- and 200-meter butterfly, the 200 individual medley, and the 200 breaststroke.

The breaststroke is simply a workout, something to do on the final day of the meet Monday. But those other three are his best events, the ones he’s clearly eyeing for the Rio Olympics. While Phelps figures to be the class of the field in San Antonio, he’ll be eager to compare his times to the ones being put up in Kazan, where the eight-day swimming competition began Sunday.

“Of course, it’s going to motivate me,” Phelps said. “I don’t want to be No. 2. I don’t want to be No. 3. I can’t stand it. Sure, this is different. But it’s still the end of the (season), and I’d like to put up some No. 1 times in the world.”

Phelps won’t be the only Olympic gold medalist in San Antonio. Training partner Allison Schmitt, one of the biggest stars of the 2012 London Games, failed to qualify for the last two world championships and finally went public this year with her battle against depression. She hopes the nationals will show that her life and swimming career are back on track with the Rio Games just a year away.

Cullen Jones, a four-time Olympic medalist, will also be at nationals, along with Dana Vollmer, who has four Olympic golds and recently returned to competition after the birth of her first child.

But all eyes will be on Phelps, who seems to have taken his life in a different direction away from the pool. He’s engaged to be married, celebrated his 30th birthday at the end of June, and has thrown himself fully into training for what he said will surely be his final Olympics.

“I don’t go to bed at night worrying about what I’m going to find in the morning,” said Bob Bowman, the swimmer’s longtime coach. “That wasn’t always the case.”

Phelps said therapy helped him uncover and address some of the issues weighing down his seemingly perfect life.

“I feel like people think I’m more approachable now than I ever was,” he said. “I feel like I am OK and I am happy with who I am. I feel like I’ve learned so much about myself, who I truly am. I can honestly say there aren’t many people in this world who have seen who I really am.”

Adrian qualifies for 100 free finals at worlds

United States' Nathan Adrian checks his time after a men's 100 freestyle heat at the World Championships in Kazan, Russia, Wednesday. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
United States’ Nathan Adrian checks his time after a men’s 100 freestyle heat at the World Championships in Kazan, Russia, Wednesday. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

Bremerton’s Nathan Adrian, the defending Olympic champion in the 100 freestyle, will be going for his first World Championship when he takes to the water tomorrow in Kazan, Russia.

Adrian qualified in fifth with a time of 48.36 seconds in Wednesday’s semifinals at the Kazan Arena pool. Adrian had a strong first 50 meters in 22.45 seconds, including a great start off the block with a .67 second reaction time, but faded in the second 50 (25.91) as the rest of the field caught up to him. He finished fourth in the first heat. You can listen to him talk about the race via audio from Swimming World.

Adrian said in a post-race online interview with Eurosport.com that the race was good, but it wasn’t as fast as what the swimmers in the 200 freestyle were producing.

“It doesn’t mean tomorrow’s not going to be fast,” he said.

Adrian said it’s time to go back to Team USA and rest and recover for the final.

“Just going to … prepare and try to be better,” he said.

Australia’s Cameron McEvoy had the top time, winning the first heat in 47.94 seconds, his first time under 48 seconds this year. China’s Zetao Ning was second in 48.13.

Russian favorite Vladimir Morozov was disqualified after jumping at the start off the block, sending a shudder of disappointment through the pro-Russian crowd. His reaction time was under .50 seconds.