Tag Archives: Werner Road

Walker hopes for a Werner Road sidewalk

The in basket: Fred Chichester writes, “I have lived in the Navy Yard City most of my life. I have found a
perfect walk from my house off of National Avenue. I walk up to Loxie
Eagans and take a left and head up towards the State Patrol office. There is sidewalk to that point.

“I like to walk up the Werner Road hill to the end up by the UPS business at the end, and back. This is a challenging
walk with the hills and is a perfect 3 1/4 mile one-hour walk round trip to
my house.

“I know numerous folks walk this route but you’re always very
cautious with the traffic on the hill especially since there is no actual
sidewalk. I always face traffic so I have the last ditch
option if a car ever comes toward me.

“(It) would be ideal if we could get a sidewalk at least on the
side facing traffic going up the hill as it would make the walk a lot safer and I bet even more folks would use it.”

The out basket: I’ve been of the impression that new sidewalks are built only as part of a larger road project, or as mitigation required during some business development.

But since providing for bicyclists and pedestrians is so much in vogue in the road building business these days, as evidenced by all the shoulder paving listed in Kitsap County’s six-year road plan (called the TIP), I asked county officials if that’s no longer true.

The county’s answer was brief. Greg Cioc, Kitsap’s transportation planner, said, “Mr. Chichester should submit his request and solution to the TIP process and it will be ranked with all other requests.  Go to http://www.kitsapgov.com/pw/Tip_Project_Proposal_form.asp to submit an idea.”

The county commissioners approve the TIP each December, listing what is planned for the subsequent six years.

Valid handicapped space must have vertical sign

The in basket: Becky Argyle has a question about handicapped parking in front of a new Subway sandwich shop on Werner Road, across from the Bremerton car dealerships.

There are two handicapped parking pavement markings in front of the store, but one has a white line running through it, giving the appearance of two parking spots were it not for the painted image on the asphalt.

“I would guess they took a handicapped space and converted it into two parking spots and never painted it correctly,” she said.

“if there is any marking of a handicapped space in the parking space, is it illegal to park there if you do not have a tag, even if it appears that its not a real marked spot?” Becky asked.  “I always hesitate to park there, but there is hardly any parking along their building.”

The out basket: Becky’s guess is correct. To be a valid handicapped space, it must be marked with a vertical sign in front of it, either on a wall or post.. There is no such sign on the space with the line painted through it.

There is a valid handicapped space several feet to the right, which has the pavement marking AND the vertical sign. You can’t legally park there without a handicapped plate or placard.

Deputy Sheriff Scot Wilson said it appears the building owners are just waiting for the wheelchair logo on the pavement of the first space to wear away in time. The KCSO Citizens on Patrol volunteers, who patrol and cite for improper use of handicapped spaces won’t cite for parking in the Subway space without the vertical sign.

What’s Transit building in West Bremerton?

 

The in basket: Every time I drive by Kitsap Transit’s operations base on Charleston Avenue in Bremerton’s west end, I wonder what they are building there, and whether construction in a time of service cutbacks is a PR headache for them.

The out basket: Yes, it is, says Transit CEO Dick Hayes, but it’s the old story of funding coming from sources that can’t be shifted to operations. “This is capital grant money that can’t be used for anything else,” he said.

Expanding operations bases is hard to get done, due to permit requirements, he said. This one was further complicated by the need to acquire the old Callow Avenue that runs between the operations base and the shipyard. They got the permits, acquired the street in a trade with the city for part of the Bremerton Transportation Center site, and had an approaching deadline to use the grant money. So they went ahead. 

The work will allow the Access bus service for the elderly and infirm to relocate to the operations base from its current site near the end of steep Werner Road.

It’s not a good place to operate out of when it snows, he said, and it puts extra miles on the the Access buses when they get the same preventative maintenance as the routed buses.

The $4.5 million project is adding a wash rack for the buses, more room for that preventive maintenance, and will double available parking, he said.

“Some day we’ll have more money to run more services,” he said, and the base expansion will pay off then, he said. 

Transit owns the Werner Road site and will sell it when Access moves, in about seven months, he said.

Though Callow Avenue will be closed to the public, Transit had to agreed to let the Navy use the property for emergency evacuation of its multi-story parking garage on the other side of the street, if that is ever necessary, Dick said.