Tale of two speed limits approaching Gorst

 

 

The in basket: Diane Violette writes that she finds the merge of highways 16 and 166 westbound into Gorst stressful because she and others on 166 have been governed by a 45-mile-per-hour speed limit while those on 16 have been able to go 60.

“It is a huge hazard trying to stay at the 45-mph speed limit while being in the left lane,” she said. “I can’t help being in this lane because it’s automatic when getting out of Port Orchard, but NOBODY from 16 follows the 45 mph speed limit. I attempt to safely move to the next right lane ASAP but because that lane becomes a merge lane very soon, it is dangerous to get over there. 

“Someone needs to look at what is happening in this area because it is so dangerous and scary to follow the speed limit there if you are in the left lane coming from Port Orchard. What speed limit do those coming from 16 think it is in that area?”

The out basket: They probably think it’s 60 mph, which it is, the State Patrol tells me. She should skip all the lane changing and just speed up to 60 mph until she reaches the 40 mph zone just a few hundred feet ahead. 

Told this, she noted there are no signs informing a driver coming out of Port Orchard that that speed limit has gone up to 60. Diane’s gun-shy, she said, because she got nailed in a school zone for speeding recently, even though there no longer was a school there. The cop told her, “it doesn’t matter where or if there is a school nearby—you follow the sign,” she said. 

“If I got a ticket for going 60 mph where that P.O./16 merge is, what would be my defense?” she asked. “Your column? Why has no speed limit sign been posted there yet—talk about an accident waiting to happen!”

I guess my column will have to do. Steve Bennett, traffic operations engineer for the state’s Olympic Region said they won’t add a sign notifying drivers of the increase to 60 mph coming out of Highway 166. 

He explained that the sign warning of the upcoming reduction in Gorst to 40 mph is “just 700 feet beyond the point that Highway 166 enters Highway 16.  We do not want to confuse motorists on Highway 16 with two speed limit signs so close together.”

4 thoughts on “Tale of two speed limits approaching Gorst

  1. To quote:
    “Diane’s gun-shy, she said, because she got nailed in a school zone for speeding recently, even though there no longer was a school there. The cop told her, “it doesn’t matter where or if there is a school nearby—you follow the sign,” she said.”

    Let me guess: Sheridan Road in East Bremerton, just east of Albertson’s? That’s where I got tagged 5 years ago. I asked, “where’s the school?” The BPD officer pointed north, “over there”. Yeah, waaaay over there…

  2. What a waste of fuel! Why not lower the speed limit on 16, coming down the hill, to match the limit coming out of Port Orchard. Hwy 166 drivers otherwise have to accelerate abruptly, only to brake to slow down.
    Alternatively, Hwy 166 limit could be increased safely, I believe.

  3. Well, what did expect from the State DOT traffic operations engineers.
    These are the same people who designed the NEW Silverdale Waga Way Hwy. 3 interchange!
    Talk about incompetent idiots!

  4. I disagree with the state on this one. They could install a 60mph sign on Hwy 166 just before the Hwy 16 overpass. There are no resident turn offs after this point. So what would be the harm of doing this? By the way, their reason for not putting up a sign because of the distance holds no water. All one need do is go thru out the country and see speed limit signages that are close together.

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