No ‘cycle endorsement will get your bike impounded

The in basket: Chris Smalley asks whether a motorcyclist stopped and found not to have the required motorcycle endorsement on his license will have his bike confiscated.


The in basket: Chris Smalley asks whether a motorcyclist stopped and found not to have the required motorcycle endorsement on his license will have his bike confiscated
The out basket: Not confiscated, which to me means being permanently deprived of. But effective last July 22, motorcyclists stopped without the endorsement face impoundment of their bikes, which can be costly to get back.
Lt. Ken Noland of the state patrol in Bremerton said the state Legislature passed a law authorizing that last session.
“This gave us a tool to help encourage proper training, testing and licensing,” he said. “With the
price of gas going up and the efficiency of motorcycles, we are seeing
large increases in the number of motorcycles licensed. However, in
contrast ,we are not seeing the same increase in riders getting the
proper license endorsement.”
Assistant WSP Chief Brian A. Ursino added, “Although this new law and policy address all vehicles requiring special
endorsement, collision
data clearly demonstrates our most significant fatality collision
problem exists with motorcycles.
Motorcycle fatalities have risen from 57 in 2003 to 82 in 2006, and we
know approximately 40 percent
of the deceased motorcycle operators in these fatal crashes were not
properly endorsed. This
new law and policy have been enacted, in part, to specifically address
this issue.”
Look in the Yellow Pages under Motorcycle Instruction to learn how to get the endorsement.

3 thoughts on “No ‘cycle endorsement will get your bike impounded

  1. Correlation does not equal causation. Motorcycle licenses have nothing to do with rider skill. After all, how many car crashes involve licensed drivers? We have all taken the drivers license exam.
    How much “training” is involved in licensing? Or is it really about control? Assuming motorcycle riders are already car drivers (about 90 percent of them) they already know the rules of the road. The riding portion of the exam only takes place in the parking lot, and involves ZERO actual on-road testing.
    The whole thing is about control and not about safety.

  2. A motorcycle license, as a car license – show the driver has had the most basic training… and I cannot imagine doing without either training.

    In my opinion, ‘rules of the road’ are quite different for the motorcycle rider… and they should be licensed and trained especially for the motorcycle.

  3. As I read your statistics, I have to wonder…40 percent of deceased riders are not properly endorsed. My math tells me that the remaining 60 percent are endorsed riders. Hmmm?

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