Did off-ramp light provide conflicting greens during windstorm?

The in basket: Richard Nerf of Bremerton says that on Oct. 18, the day of a big fall windstorm, he found the traffic light at the northbound off-ramp from Highway 3 at Newberry Hill Road behaving in a way he didn’t think was possible.


The in basket: Richard Nerf of Bremerton says that on Oct. 18, the day of a big fall windstorm, he found the traffic light at the northbound off-ramp from Highway 3 at Newberry Hill Road behaving in a way he didn’t think was possible.
“During the height of the windstorm,” he said, “as I approached the intersection, I saw that exiting traffic had the green light, but cars at the light were not taking advantage of it. 
“When I got closer, I could see that the eastbound traffic on Newberry Hill ALSO had a green light (and from their behavior, I infer the westbound drivers did too).  Drivers in lanes with a queue realized what was happening and were treating the intersection as a four-way stop, but eastbound through traffic had no direct clue that there was a problem. Several cars went through at full speed while I was waiting for a safe chance to turn westbound.
“I drove for many years in Houston where lightning storms made signal failures common, but I never encountered a both-ways-green traffic light, just all-ways-red, flashing red, or off.  I remember being told that there was an interlock that would disable the signal before it could display conflicting green lights.  Has the modern computer-based technology lost this fail-safe or fail-soft mode?”
The out basket: Don Anders of the Olympic Region signal shop for state highways says all traffic signals have such an interlock, to use Richard’s term, but Don calls it a “conflict monitor.”
“It puts the system in four-way flash mode if a situation like the one described should occur, and the signal then has to be manually reset to normal operation,” Don said. “Our crews went out and checked the signal and records show that the system is working as it should and no problems have come up.”
The records don’t show what signal heads were green at any particular moment in the past, though. But Don’s bottom line response is that Richard must have been mistaken.
Do any of you other readers recall seeing that light showing green in conflicting directions at the same time during that storm or at any other time?  

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