Why ‘yield’ signs, rather than ‘merge’ signs

The in basket: Retired State Sen. Bob Oke was riding with one of the courtesy drivers from an auto dealership, getting a ride while his car was being serviced, and the man asked, as Bob put it, “why the signs at the Port Orchard roundabout say ‘yield’ when ‘merge’ works all over the rest of the country.”


The in basket: Retired State Sen. Bob Oke was riding with one of the courtesy drivers from an auto dealership, getting a ride while his car was being serviced, and the man asked, as Bob put it, “why the signs at the Port Orchard roundabout say ‘yield’ when ‘merge’ works all over the rest of the country.”
The out basket: I’m not sure where the fellow is seeing merge signs. They are rare in my experience. Their failing is that they alert a driver to something about to happen, but give him or her no direction as to what to do about it. “Yield” gives an instruction that tells the driver what to do when he meets a car at the merge.
“The national standard for signing roundabouts calls for yield signs to be used,” says Steve Bennett of the state highway engineers,” probably for that reason.”

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