Construction or Not, It’s Smart to Obey the Sign

The in basket: Rod Gross writes, “I live off the newly renovated/widened Silverdale Way, just north of
Silverdale. I adhere to the posted “work in progress” speed limit of 30 mph since there are still signs on both the north and the south ends of the work zone stating that’s the limit.
“When I drive 30 mph, I get passed frequently and receive angry looks from drivers who obviously don’t think the limit should still be 30, since the work is apparently
completed. My question is when will the signs be removed, and prior to that .. am I wrong to still obey them?”


The in basket: Rod Gross writes, “I live off the newly renovated/widened Silverdale Way, just north of
Silverdale. I adhere to the posted “work in progress” speed limit of 30 mph since there are still signs on both the north and the south ends of the work zone stating that’s the limit.
“When I drive 30 mph, I get passed frequently and receive angry looks from drivers who obviously don’t think the limit should still be 30, since the work is apparently
completed. My question is when will the signs be removed, and prior to that .. am I wrong to still obey them?”
The out basket: This problem appears to have righted itself. There were no 30 mph signs at either end of the project Thursday afternoon and lots of permanent 45 mph signs.
Still, Doug Bear of Kitsap County Public Works says, “The project is not yet complete. Signal systems at Ridgetop and Bennington are being installed this week.” So it’s possible some construction zone slow down will be restored before everything is buttoned up.
You won’t catch any police agency admitting a tolerance policy on any speed limit, and Deputy Scott Wilson of Kitsap County Sheriff’s Office says KCSO will enforce the reduce posted limit when it is signed that way.
“Mr. Gross is correct in adhering to the reduced speed limit, even if other drivers feel that construction work is apparently finished.”
I often advocate going 3 to 8 miles over the posted limit since that’s the common practice of many drivers, the police seem to leave you alone if that’s all you’re doing, and, I think, it reduces anxiety and conflict on the roads and makes things safer.
But fines double in work zones, so there and in school zones is probably the worst possible spot to test my theory. Rod was perfectly within his rights and quite possibly smarter than those who were going faster than 30 through that area while the work zone signs were up.
Doug also passed along an update on the other big Silverdale projects of this year.
The Myhre Road bridge reopened Wednesday. It will have intermittent lane closures through next week, he said, but traffic now can get to and from Mickelberry Road and points east via the new bridge.
Crews were installing guardrail Thursday in the other bridge project, just north of Waaga Way on Silverdale Way and traffic was flowing normally.

One thought on “Construction or Not, It’s Smart to Obey the Sign

  1. So Travis lets test your theory on paper a little bit before we go to the streets.
    The speed limit in downtown Bremerton is 25 mph but you feel it would be all right to travel those streets at 33-35 mph. Chico Way is 45 but we should push that up over 50 near 55. Wheaton Way between Riddell and the Warren Ave Bridge is 30 but lets pust that up near 40. That one interests me seeing there is a dangerouse center turn lane on that one.
    I plan to write to the Chief of Police of Bremerton, The Kitsap County Sheriff and State Highway Patrol to find out why they are not enforce the posted speed limits. Especially on our city streets.

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