Speaking of Fleas and Other Favorite Acronyms

The in basket: A couple of recent Road Warrior topics produced some entertaining responses.
The discussion of the Navy’s penchant for weird acronyms, and the state’s going along with “Subase Bangor” on some Highway 303 road signs, inspired George Karl (presumably not the pro basketball coach) to write “Your story sort of makes me smile. Back when I was in the Navy I had a school I attended in San Diego.  My friends that sent me letters, etc. always complained about the address:
FLEASWTRACENPAC


The in basket: A couple of recent Road Warrior topics produced some entertaining responses.
The discussion of the Navy’s penchant for weird acronyms, and the state’s going along with “Subase Bangor” on some Highway 303 road signs, inspired George Karl (presumably not the pro basketball coach) to write “Your story sort of makes me smile. Back when I was in the Navy I had a school I attended in San Diego.  My friends that sent me letters, etc. always complained about the address:
FLEASWTRACENPAC… I told them it’s ‘Navy’ for ‘Fleet Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Center Pacific’.  It still makes me laugh when they spelled it out as ‘Fleas with trace-n-pac’ on the envelopes.  It always managed to find me even with that address!”
Andrea Rudman speculated as follows about the name the Navy has chosen to replace Subase. She wrote, “Naval Base Kitsap at Bangor………..KBANG??”
On another subject, Charles Pantano said there is some disagreement among people he talks with at one of the local casinos as to whether non-alcoholic beers are included under the prohibition of having an open container within reach of the driver of a vehicle on the public roads. I reported on April 17 that it doesn’t include passengers in a motor home sitting well away from the driver, though the exact demarcation point between when it’s a violation and when it’s not is unclear.
The out basket: There’s nothing I can add to the acronym issue (or the ACRISH, the Navy would probably call it), but I can say the open container law specifies alcoholic beverages, not beer, and since O’Doul’s and such are by definition non-alcoholic, open bottles of them aren’t prohibited – unless a person pours real beer into them, I suppose.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Before you post, please complete the prompt below.

Please enter the word MILK here: