How to find the right-of-way boundary

The in basket: Philip Menees says, “If you drive along Beach Drive out of Port Orchard on both sides of Waterman dock, there have been erected reflectors and placement of large boulders at the edge of the road. To me this seems to be a dangerous practice, even though it is, I’m sure, to deter parking in front of people’s homes.
“Is the edge of the pavement the edge of the right of way, and does one have the right to park on the right of way outside the fog line? How can one determine the edge of the right of way and one’s private property?”


The in basket: Philip Menees says, “If you drive along Beach Drive out of Port Orchard on both sides of Waterman dock, there have been erected reflectors and placement of large boulders at the edge of the road. To me this seems to be a dangerous practice, even though it is, I’m sure, to deter parking in front of people’s homes.
“Is the edge of the pavement the edge of the right of way, and does one have the right to park on the right of way outside the fog line? How can one determine the edge of the right of way and one’s private property?”
The out basket: Doug Bear, spokesman for Kitsap County Public Works, says “Right-of-way varies by location, but the edge of the pavement is
usually not the end of the right-of-way (ROW).
“Motorists generally have the right to park on the ROW beyond the fog
line provided it does not interfere with traffic, is not specifically
prohibited, and sufficient space exists within the right-of-way to
safely park the vehicle. Our traffic investigator has looked at this
location and does not think sufficient space exists there to safely park
vehicles.”
“There are a few ways to determine right-of-way and property boundaries,” he continued. “Residents can review Public Works records to determine the road
right-of-way. Resident can review other county records (Assessor, Department of Community Development, etc.) to determine private property lines. Residents also can hire a professional surveyor to locate property corners and property boundaries.”

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