Category Archives: Demographics

MAP: Migration to and from Kitsap

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Ever wonder where Kitsap residents move from and where they go when they leave?

The Census Bureau has answers.

The map below shows net migration between Kitsap County and other U.S. Counties for 2009 through 2013, based on Census estimates (you can find the raw data and methodology here).

 

Instructions: Use the zoom tools to explore the map, or select individual states from the dropdown menu in the top right corner. Hover your mouse over the counties to see details. Click the house button to reset the map. 

Counties in the map are color coded. Counties shades of red are counties more Kitsap residents have moved to than have moved from. Counties in green are counties more residents have moved from than have moved to.

There are lots of interesting trends here I’ll hopefully be able to explore in more detail. Feel free to drop a comment below if something catches your eye.

County job numbers, employment improved in 2015

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More Kitsap residents were employed and more people were working at jobs inside the county in 2015, according to preliminary year-end numbers released by the Employment Security Department.  

Kitsap jobs

An average of 87,600 people worked for employers within the county last year, a 3.7 percent uptick from 2014. It was also a slight increase from Kitsap’s pre-recession high of 87,400, reported in 2006.

Job growth came from both the private and government sectors, which increased employment by 2.7 percent and 5.4 percent respectively.

Here’s a graphical look at job trends in Kitsap:

Employment/unemployment

Overall employment among Kitsap residents remains lower than before the recession, but there were signs of improvement last year.

0827_KSLO_Wash-625x417The labor force – the total number of people working or seeking work – appeared to stabilize over the past three years, after declining through the recession. Kitsap’s labor force averaged 113,580 in 2015.

Average employment rose in 2014 and 2015, reaching 107,200 last year.

An average of 6,382 Kitsap residents were counted as unemployed last year, though the number only included people who were actively seeking work.

The county’s unemployment rate has fallen steadily since 2010, reaching 5.6 percent in 2015. This was partially due to declines in the labor force.

Here’s a graphical look at employment trends in Kitsap:

Kitsap apartment rents up 15 percent in 2015

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Rent for apartments in Kitsap surged 15.4 percent in 2015, according to Tom Cain of Apartment Insights Washington. 

The average rent per apartment unit in the county was $1,071 in the fourth quarter of 2015, an increase of $143 from the same period of 2014.

Apartment vacancies eased slightly to 3.44 percent in the fourth quarter. Vacancies are still much lower than in years past.

The market was tightest in Bremerton, where about 2.64 percent of apartments were vacant. About 4.12 percent were available in the Bainbridge Island/Poulsbo submarket.

Apartment Insights collects its numbers by surveying apartment complexes with 50 or more units.

NOTE: A reader asked me to better define what the term “unit.” In this case it refers to any apartment, regardless of the number of bedrooms. The average per-unit rent is simply the average rent for all apartments in the area. 

Here’s a graphical look at apartment trends in the county:

Strong job numbers continued through October

Kitsap entered the holiday hiring season with more jobs than in previous years.

About 88,700 people were working for Kitsap companies in October, according to preliminary numbers from the state Employment Security Office. That was about 1,700 more than were employed in October 2014.

Numbers were up in the private sector, but the public sector posted a bigger gain, with an increase of about 1,200 jobs.

Here’s a graphical look at October job numbers:

Employment/unemployment

Kitsap’s labor force (the total number of residents working or seeking work) remained lower than previous years, but began to climb in October, as is typical for the season.

About 1,250 people entered the workforce between September and October.

Overall employment among Kitsap residents still fell slightly in October, and remains lower than in recent years.

The county’s unemployment rate remained steady at 5 percent.

Here’s a graphical look at employment trends:

Kitsap ranked 10th in per capita income growth

personal.incomePer capita income grew faster in Kitsap last year than in most Washington counties.

Kitsap posted the 10th largest increase in per capita personal income from 2013 to 2014 among the state’s 39 counties, according to a recent report from the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Per capita by county, click to enlarge
Per capita income by county, click to enlarge

Per capita income grew 5.3 percent in Kitsap during that period, besting the state average of 4.5 percent. The county’s per capita income level reached $46,573 in 2014.

Kitsap ranked fourth for per capita income, behind King County ($68,877), San Juan County ($59,831) and Island County ($46,608).

Personal income is the total amount earned by residents from wages and other income sources, before taxes. Per capita income is calculated by dividing personal income by population.

The growth in per capita income for 2014 came on the heels of a statewide slowdown in 2013. Per capita income in 0.6 percent in Kitsap between 2012 and 2013, and 0.3 percent in Washington.

Below is a sortable chart of 2014 per capita personal income levels and growth rates by county:

County posted promising job numbers in September

Kitsap continued to post promising job numbers through the third quarter of the year.

An estimated 87,800 people employed within the county in September, up 1,400 from September 2014, according to the Employment Security Department. 

The a largest gains came in the government sector, which added 900 jobs from the same month last year.

While the numbers are encouraging, Employment Security has tempered expectations for hiring in the fourth quarter. State economists expect holiday season hiring to remain largely unchanged from last year, according to a recent report. 

Looking ahead to next year, the rollout of new stores at Kitsap Mall and The Trails at Silverdale should bode well for retail employment.

Here’s a graphical look at jobs numbers in the county:

 

Employment/unemployment

As positive trends continued on the jobs front, overall employment trends in the county have been less encouraging. Both the labor force (the total number of Kitsap residents working or seeking work) and the number of people employed slid in the third quarter.

About 104,971 Kitsap residents were working in September, down about 400 from September of 2014.

With declines in the labor force outpacing declines in employment, Kitsap’s official unemployment rate fell to 5 percent.

Here’s a graphical look at employment trends in the county:

Apartment vacancies still low, rents rising

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Prospective homebuyers in Kitsap County have fewer options this fall, as the number of available houses continues to plunge.

Apartment hunters face a similar challenge.

Vacancy rates at Kitsap’s large apartment complexes remained very low in the third quarter of 2015, with 3.23 percent of units available (see graphic below). Port Orchard was the tightest submarket in the county, reporting a vacancy rate of 3.06 percent, according to Tom Cain of Apartment Insights Washington. 

606Burwell_9424507_ver1.0_640_480Kitsap’s apartment vacancy rate is lower than rates for King/Snohomish, Pierce and Thurston county markets.

Apartment rents continued to creep up in the third quarter, reaching reaching $1,058 per unit in Kitsap.

Rents increased 14.5 percent in the past year. Apartments in Kitsap remain significantly cheaper than in King/Snohomish but more expensive than in Pierce or Thurston.

As with the real estate market, new construction should eventually help ease the squeeze. Several apartment projects are underway in Bremerton.

Pre-leasing has begun for the 71-unit 606 Apartments on Burwell Street, scheduled to open Dec. 1, according to a Facebook post.

Here’s a graphical look at apartment rental trends in Kitsap:

Kitsap jobs numbers rival pre-recession highs

It’s been a slow climb, but Kitsap County appears to have replaced the jobs it lost in the recession.

The Employment Security Department estimated 88,500 people were working for businesses and government agencies in the county in June. That was just 400 shy of the 88,900 working in the county in June of 2006, before employment numbers started to fall.

Both the private and government sectors have steadily added jobs in Kitsap this year. About 2,200 more people were working for private employers in June than at the same time a year ago. Government employment was up by 800 in the county — all federal jobs.

 

Employment/unemployment

Overall employment trends are also looking more positive, due in large part to some recalculations by Employment Security.

We’ve been reporting declines in the county’s labor force (the total number of residents working or seeking work) for some time now.

About once a year the department adjusts employment numbers for the state and counties based on the best population numbers available. The most recent adjustment lowered labor force and employment estimates from previous years.

As a result, Kitsap’s labor force and employment numbers now appear to be gradually improving:

Kitsap’s labor force grew by 1.2 percent between June 2014 and June 2015. Employment among county residents was up 1.4 percent.

Strong jobs numbers carry through February

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Kitsap County enjoyed a strong start to the year on the employment front, with more jobs and more county residents working in January than in previous years.

That momentum carried through February, with solid, if less robust, employment numbers.

Jobs in Kitsap

The number of people working for Kitsap employers in February dipped slightly from January, but was still 2.5 percent higher than in February 2014, according to preliminary data from the Employment Security Department. 

Both private companies and government agencies in Kitsap employed more people in February than at the same time in 2014.

Here’s a graphical look at jobs in Kitsap County:

 

Labor force and employment

Overall employment numbers for Kitsap residents were less encouraging. haggen

The labor force — the total number of county residents working or actively looking for work — shrank between January to February, and was smaller than in February 2014.

Employment followed a similar trend, sliding from about 108,800 Kitsap resident working in January to 108,070 in February.

Here’s a graphical look at labor force and employment trends: