A Chat Between an Officer and a Wanted Man in the Bathroom

Blogger’s Note: Strange conversation between police officers and the suspects they arrest isn’t really uncommon, as you well know if you read our Code 911 section. But this report, saved from our dusty archives, is one of the oddest I’ve seen.

It was early June when a Bremerton sergeant was patrolling Sixth Street near downtown Bremerton in the early morning hours. The sergeant reported that he’d seen a car driven by a man he recognized — someone he’d contacted on the beat in the past — who turned into a local convenience store.

The sergeant watched as a passenger from the man’s car walked “rapidly” into the store, and felt perhaps that passenger had reason to evade him. So the sergeant decided to go in the convenience store and found that the man had gone into the bathroom.

“I stood by for several minutes and could hear the paper towel dispenser rattling, the toilet flushing and the sink running at different times,” the sergeant wrote.

The sergeant then tried the door knob.

“Yeah, can I help you? What do you need?” the man said from the bathroom.

“I found (these) to be odd statements, as most people would respond, “Occupied” and/or “I’m in here,” the sergeant wrote in his report.

The sergeant waited a few more minutes until the man inside exited. The sergeant then asked, “Hey, what’s your name?”

The man told him. But the sergeant noted that he’d asked the driver of the man outside who he was, and had responded with a different name.

“Why would your friend give me a different name?” the sergeant asked.

And then the likely truth emerged.

“I don’t know,” the man said. “Probably because I haven’t checked in with my (Department of Corrections) officer.”

If he hadn’t checked in, that could be a violation of his release from prison, and therefore the officer asked the man if he thought he had a warrant.

“Probably,” the man replied.

The sergeant asked why the man had been in such a hurry to go in the convenience store, though his suspicions were likely confirmed by the fact a warrant could be out for the man’s arrest.

The man replied, using an expletive, that he’d needed to use the facilities. Apparently rather badly.

“I entered the bathroom and noted that I did not detect any odor associated with such (a) bodily function,” the sergeant wrote.

The sergeant searched the man, who told him: “I have dope in my pocket.” Sure enough, some meth was found.

The man was taken to the Kitsap County jail for the corrections warrant and possession of meth. Bail was set at $25,000.

6 thoughts on “A Chat Between an Officer and a Wanted Man in the Bathroom

  1. Funny story, appreciate your sharing.

    btw, the word “Department” is spelt incorrectly once, and the word “convenience” is spelt incorrectly not once, but twice.

  2. Really happy to see the BPD’s ability to talk their way through situations like this. This ended with nobody hurt and not a lot of time wasted. A lot of departments would have somehow turned this and many others into violent confrontations, then spent more time filling paperwork than they would have if they had talked a subject down.

  3. Hmmm… now how could the police office be sure the suspect HADN’T gone to the restroom? Just because he didn’t detect the odor of urine or feces? My son flushes as he’s emptying his bladder and excavating his bowels which prevents any lingering odors to remain behind… Dude, would have loved to have seen the cop prove THAT in court!

  4. what was the sergants reason for stopping the man? JUst because he was arrested before? the bpd would not get 75 percent of the convictions that the do without the questionable police ethics used on the street. The man was in possesion, yes, but having priors is not probable cause to stop and badger someone. once again th bpd governs its own laws, so for all you pro-police communists, maybe you all should take your unamerican beliefs and move somewhere that doesnt have civil rights.

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