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Posts Tagged ‘Linda Simpson’

What was the biggest election surprise?

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Did you participate in an election pool and lose because you picked Rob McKenna over Jay Inslee? Did you think Linda Simpson would carry her primary momentum into the general election and defeat Charlotte Garrido in the county commissioner’s race? Did you buy into Karl Rove’s “math you do as a Republican to make yourself feel better” and think all the polls predicting an Obama victory were slanted?

Or was it something else? Was the margin of victory for gay marriage proponents slimmer than you thought it would be? Did Washington voters allowing for charter schools surprise you?

Let us know on the right, and in the comments section.


Simpson waiting for final count, weighing her future plans

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

Linda Simpson, Republican candidate for Kitsap County Commissioner, District 2, was not available for comment last night after election results came in. The initial tally showed her trailing Democrat Charlotte Garrido by 3,753 votes. The percentage margin was 52 to 47.

Simpson called today to say she was disappointed and somewhat stunned by the results.

“I was kind of hoping it would be the other way around,” she said. “It’s not insurmountable, so there’s a little bit of hope.”

But an update posted by the Kitsap County Auditor at 5 p.m showed the margin between the two had barely budged. Garrido is now leading Simpson by 3,969 votes, with 77,245 votes counted in this race. Kitsap has 39,000 ballots in hand yet to be counted, according to the Washington State Auditor, and all are eligible to vote in the commissioner’s race.

Simpson decided to pursue the commissioner’s seat after seeing considerable success in the 2010 race for 35th District representative, position 2. In that race, she ended up losing to Democrat Fred Finn by a mere 52 votes in Kitsap County. The totals in the four counties that made up the 35th at the time (Kitsap, Grays Harbor, Mason and Thurston) gave 29,543 votes to Finn and 25,724 votes to Simpson, a difference of 3,819 votes.

Simpson today said she went into the homestretch of her campaign for county commissioner feeling optimistic. Not only was she getting support from her own party, but non-Republicans had voiced their intent to cast their ballots for her.

Simpson believes the message that resonated with voters of all political persuasions was her commitment to represent individual rights and give a transparent accounting of how taxpayers’ dollars are spent. On election night, Simpson was almost sure she would win.

“I really felt good about (the campaign),” she said. “I really felt quite surprised and dismayed that the results were the opposite.”

Simpson will wait for the final count to come in before throwing in the towel. But she’s looking ahead to the possibility of a loss. Glass-more-than-half-full type that she is, Simpson, a Navy reservist on leave, said she would take advantage of the down time if she loses the race.

Since running against Finn, Simpson has lost her leg in a motorcycle accident, won four medals in the Warrior Games for injured military members and jumped into the commissioner’s race last summer, less than a year after her injury. Simpson is training for the upcoming Warrior Games in Hawaii. She hopes some day to start a foundation to give financial assistance to military amputees who, unlike herself, lack funds to cope with their disabilities. And to be honest, she could use a little “me” time to relax and regroup, she said.

Simpson does not rule out a future run for public office. “I wouldn’t say never, but I wouldn’t say it’s a high priority on my list right now,” she said.


County commissioner: Your early picks

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

Rob Gelder and Chris Tibbs could rematch. Linda Simpson wants to unseat Charlotte Garrido. We won’t know for certain until August whether these four candidates will be the final two in each commissioner race. What we do know is the race will be contested, that there will be two candidates in each race on the November ballot.

And these are the people we know who for now are the only ones going for the job.

So let us who know who your TWO picks are in the survey on the righthand column. Pick one in each race.


Simpson makes the games

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

Linda Simpson, who ran against Fred Finn for a 35th District legislative seat in 2010, received word this week she will be participating in the Warrior Games in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Simpson lost most of her left leg in a traffic accident in September. In January she participated in the Wounded Warrior Training Camp in Ventura, Calif., a sort of tryout for the games. She will be doing the discus and shot put for certain and could participate in other events.

If you read Sunday’s story, besides her athletic abilities (which I’m told are ample), she was a heck of a positive influence on the other athletes in Ventura.

She and her husband, Michael, go to Colorado Springs in late April to acclimate to the high altitude. The games themselves are in early May.


More on Candidates’ Debate

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

A couple of people commenting on my story about Monday’s candidate forum complained that it was lacking in depth.

I understand that trying to give 12 candidates in six races a say in a single story can seem superficial. Even before I read those comments, I had planned to do a follow-up blog post. Today, I’ll give a little more on what I heard from 35th District candidates. Tomorrow, I’ll give 26th District Candidates their turn.

I thought the format of the forum, hosted by the League of Women Voters of Kitsap County, was good, in that they separated the races, giving candidates in each race a chance to address the questions one-on-one, instead of using a panel format. Questions were submitted by members of the audience. Because of time constraints, not all candidates got to answer all the same questions.

The whole forum will be broadcast on BKAT at 8 p.m. Sept. 16, 10 a.m. Sept. 17, 8 p.m. Sept. 23 and 7 p.m. Oct. 3. You can see video coverage of candidates in most races speaking to the Kitsap Sun’s editorial board at the Kitsap Sun’s Election Guide Web page.

No surprise, many of the questions at the forum related to the state budget, specifically:
* Gov. Chris Gregoire’s order for across the board cuts to the state budget
* contract talks between the governor’s office and the state’s largest union representing government workers.
* Fully-funded basic education.
* along with other issues

35th District Rep. Position 2
Incumbent Fred Finn, D-rural Thurston County, said he generally supports across the board cuts, given the current realities of the state budget. In theory, targeted cuts would be better, “but this is the real world,” he said.
Republican Linda Simpson of Bremerton also said she would prefer to selectively trim the budget based on priorities, but “at some point, across the board cuts seem the way to go.”

On education funding, Simpson said the amount allocated to K-12 education actually should be adequate, as long as the allocation remains dedicated specifically to education. “I honestly don’t believe it’s underfunded,” she said. “It has enough money, but it should be the number one thing that’s funded.”
Finn named education among his top three priorities, along with job growth and transportation (specifically with an eye on the yet-to-be-built Belfair Bypass). He noted his involvement in passage of a bill that revised the way school transportation is funded. Implementing fully funded education will require strong bipartisan cooperation, he said.

35th District Rep. Position 1
Candidates in this race got a question asking for “specific solutions to the budget crisis.”
Republican Dan Griffey of Allyn called for “zero-based” budgeting and a six-year budget cycle, instead of two. Like many, he talked about setting priorities, “instead of the shotgun approach.”
Incumbent Kathy Haigh said of the budget process, “It’s hard work. It’s hard and long and tedious, and I plan on being there.”

Haigh, who has chaired the Education Appropriations Committees, said education has been and remains her number one priority. In the last session, faced with the need to make cuts, she reluctantly voted to eliminate money set aside under Initiative-728 funding, for example, because it was not mandated by state law.
Griffey supports a “segregated” fund for education, and he suggested separating the job of funding education from the job of setting education policy. Fund it first, then talk policy, he said.

35th District Senate
Incumbent Tim Seldon, D-Potlatch, and challenger Nancy “Grandma” Williams, a member of Washington’s Tea Party, talked about how to help small business.
Williams, who with her husband has owned a mini-storage and cab company, said she would “get rid of B&O taxes for two years” to give businesses a chance to stabilize. She also favors deregulation and allowing “free market principals” to drive the economy. “Life is simple,” she said. “We make it difficult by putting laws and regulations on people.”
Sheldon’s family has been in the timber and oyster business, and he has a bachelor’s degree in economics and an MBA in business administration. Out of the discussion of the proposed Adage biomass project – to involve energy generation through burning of timber slash – and a question on the future of the timber industry, Sheldon gave a fairly rosy projection. While “on the ground” timber jobs have been lost to technology, the industry actually is thriving. “I see a good future for the timber industry in our area if we continue to invest in new technologies like biomass.”
Sheldon was in the minority on the biomass plant, as other candidates raised concerns about air pollution and whether the plant would be sustainable.

The candidates also talked about the importance of ferries to the 35th District, which represents Mason and portions of Grays Harbor, Kitsap, and Thurston Counties.
Williams favors privatizing the ferries. She said she recognizes the importance of ferries to commuters in the 35th.
Sheldon said Kitsap and Mason counties respectively have the number one and two longest commutes in terms of time in the state. Passenger only ferries have not proven profitable, he said, but Western Washington needs to keep up the pressure on Washington State Ferries for more regular service.
“We don’t take a backseat to anyone,” he said. “We need to start acting a little bit like the boss and tell the state ferries that they’ve got to listen.”
Sheldon favors opening ferry construction contracts to out-of-state companies.


Going to the Candidates’ Debate

Monday, September 13th, 2010

This evening, I’ll be covering a candidates’ forum hosted by the League of Women Voters of Kitsap County from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Norm Dicks Government Center, featuring candidates for house and senate races in the 26th and 35th Legislative Districts.

Post questions you’d like to ask the candidates, and I’ll see what I can do.

Visits the Kitsap Sun’s Election Guide for video coverage of editorial board interviews with candidates in most of these races.

At today’s forum:
26th Legislative District:
Senate – Derek Kilmer & Marty McClendon
Rep. Pos. 1 – Jan Angel and Sumner Schoenike
Rep. Pos. 2 – Doug Richards and Larry Seaquist

35th Legislative District:
Senate – Tim Sheldon and Nancy Williams
Rep. Pos. 1 – Daniel Griffey and Kathy Haigh
Rep. Pos. 2 – Fred Finn and Linda Simpson


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