Bipartisan SEED Support in the 35th

This evening I attended one of the Kitsap Sun editorial board’s meetings with candidates from the 35th District. I missed the first one with candidates for the second seat (Baze, Daugs, Finn, Neatherlin).

In the first seat Democratic incumbent state Rep. Kathy Haigh from Shelton and one of her challengers, Republican Brad Gehring from Bremerton, met with the board. The other Republican, Belfair’s Marco Brown, opted to not attend.

One of the board members asked the candidates whether they’d continue financially supporting Kitsap SEED as a state legislator.

“We have already,” said Haigh. “And I will again.”

Haigh said Kitsap SEED is well placed and timed for Mason County as well as Kitsap. She said supporting the project is the right thing to do as gas prices go up and she’ll do everything she can to support it.

Gehring was more cautionary, but said the SEED project presents a “tremendous opportunity” to develop a business cluster. He said he would be willing to support getting the infrastructure for it. He said it’s “one good answer,” in a conversation in which he said much about the state supporting or easing economic development.

The caveat: “We’ve got to be careful that this doesn’t become a governmentally dependent agency,” he said.

I’m told the first group didn’t get that question.

5 thoughts on “Bipartisan SEED Support in the 35th

  1. Some of them are probably saying what they think the Kitsap Sun Editorial Board wants to hear. They’re saying what they think gives them the best chance of getting the Kitsap Sun’s endorsement. Even the most casual observer knows the Kitsap Sun favors the Kitsap SEED proposal.

  2. I like to think not…that the candidates comments are based on what they think of the issue…Kitsap Sun or not.
    I like to think the KS would endorse the candidate who overall appears to be the best one for the job….not to endorse on a single issue.
    I would not subscribe to such a newspaper.
    Sharon O’Hara

  3. Blue…I disbelieve almost everything a politician says. It is what they don’t say or do that can be worrisome.

    In this case, Haigh has a past record and I believed the KS and./or the other candidates would step in if she was caught in a ‘tell the Sun what they want to hear’ story and contrary to past comments or actions.

    Yes, with some exceptions I do believe the Kitsap Sun is objective. I also believe that people have a tendency to rise to the level expected of them and no higher.
    I don’t believe in the tooth fairy. I do believe in miracles, that most people are kind and that in the end, justice will be done.
    Sharon O’Hara

  4. I would like to elaborate on Blue Light’s comment:

    “Some of them are probably saying what they think the Kitsap Sun Editorial Board wants to hear. They’re saying what they think gives them the best chance of getting the Kitsap Sun’s endorsement. Even the most casual observer knows the Kitsap Sun favors the Kitsap SEED proposal.”

    On the latter point that is absolutely true of the editorial board. In fact, the Kitsap SEED question was posed by a community board member (not a Sun staffer) who made a point to state the board’s longstanding support of the project.

    Regarding the first two sentences, that’s always a possibility. On that issue this board is likely to favor more a candidate who favors Kitsap SEED. Bear in mind I can’t speak for the board and have no say in who it endorses.

    On the first two sentences, surely a politician facing a hostile audience will most often try to frame a response to make the least negative impact possible without straying from the position. There are not many I’ve seen who will give one answer to one group and the opposite one to the other. My interpretation of Gehring’s answer is that he’d probably support funding for the infrastructure and that he thinks the SEED concept is generally a winner. He’s got his concerns, though. Should he in the future state an opinion contrary to that in any situation, we’d have reason to question his sincerity.

    My experience of Gehring in covering the council is that at least in his public comments he shows a willingness to question his gut instincts. He said he was initially against red-light cameras, but after more consideration he changed his opinion. I recall him doing that on other issues as well.

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