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Women’s Equality Day – Remembering and Moving Forward

Women’s Equality Day is  August 26th

Women’s Equality Day was designated as August 26th via a Joint Resolution of Congress in 1971.   August 26th was chosen to commemorate the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote, in 1920

According to the National Women’s History Project, “The observance of Women’s Equality Day not only commemorates the passage of the 19th Amendment, but also calls attention to women’s continuing efforts toward full equality. Workplaces, libraries, organizations, and public facilities now participate with Women’s Equality Day programs, displays, video showings, or other activities.”

This year’s Presidential Proclamation sums up the importance of the day well:
“On August 26, 1920, after years of agitating to break down the barriers that stood between them and the ballot box, American women won the right to vote. On the front lines of pickets and protests, champions from every corner of our country banded together to expand this fundamental freedom to women and forge a path toward fairer representation and greater opportunity. As we celebrate 95 years since the certification of the 19th Amendment, let us demonstrate our commitment to the belief that we are all entitled to equal treatment by supporting policies that help women succeed and thrive.”
Click here to read the entire proclamation.

Find a way to commemorate the day – It is important for all of us to remember what women before us sacrificed, and to keep moving forwards towards full equality for women.

~ Marcie


Marriage Equality – Kitsap County Joins the Nation in Celebration

While there is more work to do on many levels, today’s history making Supreme Court decision is worth celebrating.  In social justice work, in order to keep from being overwhelmed and getting burned out, we need to celebrate even small victories, and today was more than just a small victory, it was a huge one.SCOTUS Decision June 2015 Pics

Kitsap County joined folks around the nation in celebrating with at least two Bremerton bars hosting. One celebration was at the Honor Bar near Evergreen Park, and another was at the Toro Lounge downtown Bremerton.


The Supreme Court decision has far reaching impacts, and it is hard to know where to begin. However, I found some statements from a variety of organizations that I thought worth sharing. I have been working towards marriage equality for about 15 years, and many folks have been doing more for longer. Even though getting to this point in marriage equality has taken a long time, in some ways it seems like it happened fast. I guess because once the marriage equality ball started rolling through the states it really picked up speed.

The decision today is a positive thing for families all over the United States, including military families that include same sex spouses.  Since Kitsap County is a “Navy Town” the decision today affects many military families here. The American Military Partner Association posted in their blog:

“Nationwide marriage equality is a tremendous victory, and the progress made for LGBT service members and their families in just a few short years has been profound.” Before today’s decision “… even after so many states gained marriage equality, and even though the military recognized the legal marriages of our members, once they stepped off their military installation, the laws of the state often took precedence. Even if they lived in an equality state, it was very likely they would eventually be transferred; with no guarantees their new assignment would be in another equality state. They lived in fear of their families losing the everyday legal recognition others often take for granted, like married tax status, the ability to make healthcare decisions for your spouse, or enrolling your child in school.”

 The Kitsap Sun talked with the spouse of a Sailor on the USS Stennis in this article:

The effects of today’s Supreme Court ruling are so far reaching that, in a joint effort, the American Civil Liberties Union, Freedom to Marry, Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders, Human Rights Campaign, Lambda Legal and National Center for Lesbian Rights created a page of information for families with questions about how this affects them:

Lambda Legal was a key player in the legal part of the process and posted this on their blog:

“What a day! After decades of work by Lambda Legal and many others, we have at long last secured the freedom to marry for all same-sex couples throughout the entire United States. Today’s moving and inspirational decision in Obergefell v. Hodges is one for the history books.”

This victory for marriage equality is about love and families, and Kitsap PFLAG joins PFLAG National in celebrating the Supreme Court decision. PFLAG National board president Jean Hodges made this statement today:

“Today feels like a wedding that the entire country was invited to, and the whole PFLAG family is right up front with hearts overflowing and tears in our eyes. By affirming the rights of all loving couples to commit to each other with the full weight of legal protection that marriage affords, the Supreme Court has affirmed a founding principle that we must all continue to strive for: a more perfect union.”

The Trevor Project is the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people ages 13-24.  On their blog they describe how youth are affected by this decision in a positive way:

“Today we celebrate the Supreme Court’s landmark decision to uphold marriage equality across America. This historic ruling not only affects couples who have been fighting to obtain the basic civil right to get married, but also the many youth who live in families with same-sex parents. Today, all youth, including those who identify as LGBTQ, can have hope that they will grow up in a nation that is moving towards respecting all human rights.”

One of the highlights for me today was  President Obama’s expression of support. Part of what he said this morning about the Supreme Court decision is:

White House marriage equality“This ruling is a victory for Jim Obergefell and the other plaintiffs in the case. It’s a victory for gay and lesbian couples who have fought so long for their basic civil rights. It’s a victory for their children, whose families will now be recognized as equal to any other. It’s a victory for the allies and friends and supporters who spent years, even decades, working and praying for change to come.”

for the complete transcript of what President Obama said today go to:


To all of you that have played a part in getting us to where we are today, even if that part was just coming to the understanding yourself of how marriage equality is the right thing – Thank You!

It’s LGBT Pride Month!

It’s LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) Pride Month and
organizations in Kitsap County have plans well underway for
There is the main event, Kitsap Pride, as well as a special Kitsap PFLAkitsappride2015HappyPrideG
meeting.  I have also included a link to a video that might help explain why we celebrate LGBT Pride Month in June.


The main event is the Kitsap Pride Festival on July 18th, noon – 5 pm, at Evergreen Park in Bremerton.

For current information and updates check out the Kitsap Pride Network web page or follow them on Facebook:

Why June?  Are you wondering why we celebrate LGBT Pride Month in June? This video explains:
You Tube – Why Pride?
A brief historical perspective of LGBT Pride Month, along with current information about events and resources in Kitsap County.



The June 15th Kitsap PFLAG meeting will include a screening of Faces and Facets of Transgender Experience. This short documentary shares the stories of 18 transgender people and their families. It is a moving look at the issues that transgender people can face with their families and coworkers.

We will screen the film at 6:45 p.m. and then have a discussion from 7:15 p.m.
About the film:
Produced and presented by PFLAG Boulder County
Co- directed by Gus Spheeris and Carol Christenson
Jean Hodges, Executive Producer, 2010
From their web site:

About “Faces and Facets of Transgender Experience:
“Eighteen people and their families share touching stories about the journey from despair and loss to the joy of being the gender they were meant to be. Diversity of ages, ethnicity and background of the interviewees put many faces on what it means to be gender variant. Some topics include how family relationships changed, employment discrimination and coming out at work, issues with law enforcement, interactions after transition, being the parent of a gender variant child and dealing with schools. The emphasis is on positive adjustment, the healthy choices trans people make to work with the challenges, without ignoring them. The purpose for a general non-trans audience will be to create awareness, reduce discomfort and prejudice about transgender persons, and to help people see gender variance as just another aspect of the human experience.”



Another diversity related event happening is the Olympic College Diversity Conference on Jun 25th and 26th. Last year’s, their first one, was wonderfully done and I am looking forward to this year’s.

~ Marcie

Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act and Some Consequences

I am not sure Gov. Mike Pence and the state of Indiana expected quite the outcGayjusticery when they passed and signed into law a controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act. In fact, the Governor is already saying he plans to introduce a clarification of the law and that if the law was about discrimination he wouldn’t have signed it. He is not saying yet what that clarification would include. According to Lambda Legal:

If he and Indiana’s elected leadership want to be taken seriously and to fix public perception of their state, they can  — and must — take two simple steps:

  1. Pass a law to include gay and transgender people within Indiana’s existing statewide nondiscrimination rules.
  2. Add this language to the new religion law: “This chapter does not establish or eliminate a defense to a claim under any federal, state or local law protecting civil rights or preventing discrimination.

Backlash to Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act. has included:

Thousands of people gathering in downtown Indianapolis on Saturday to protest the passage of the law.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray prohibiting municipal employees from traveling to Indiana on city funds. Murray said Indiana’s new law “doesn’t reflect the values” of Seattle.

Angie’s List announcing it is canceling a $40 million headquarters expansion. According to co-founder and chief executive officer Bill Oesterle the decision is a direct result of passage of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. “Angie’s List is open to all and discriminates against none, and we are hugely disappointed in what this bill represents.” Oesterle said.

Indiana’s law is not the end of the issue either.  According to the Advocate Magazine: “It’s too late to stop Indiana’s new “turn-away-the-gays” legislation. Governor Mike Pence has signed it into law. But nearly half of the states are considering similar bills, some of which go even further.”   There are already many states that have some sort of religious freedom or religious liberty legislation.  There is a difference, though, because many of these other states, including Washington, have anti-discrimination laws that include lesbian, gay, and bisexual folks (and some include transgender folks).


~  Marcie

Presidential Proclamation and Video for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2015

President Obama issued a Presidential Proclamation and posted a video, about Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2015.  The proclamation is worth sharing, so I have posted it below.  You can  also find it at the link above.

Here is a link to the video:

Presidential Proclamation -- Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2015 | The White House


~  Marcie

Two Local Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebrations

Here are two Local Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Related Events:

Right to Dream
Wednesday, January 14, 2015
11:00 – 12:00
Naval Undersea Museum AuditoriumKeyportMLK2015jpg
Naval Undersea Warfare Center Keyport

Captain Dave Kohnke will be the Master of Ceremonies. Featured presentation by The Living Voices. The Right to Dream recreates a student’s coming of age as an African American in Mississippi during the 1950’s and 1960’s. This program illuminates the issues of civil rights, leading audiences to understand how the fight against prejudice has shaped our history.



Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration
featuring the MLK Jr. Community Choir.

Monday January 19, 2015 at 10:00 AM
President’s Hall, Kitsap County Fairgrounds, 1200 Fairgrounds Road NW, Bremerton, 360-337-5376

This annual Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday celebration is by the Ebenezer AME Church, the City of Bremerton, the Kitsap County Commissioners, and Olympic College.

This is always an enlightening and uplifting event.



~  Marcie

Transgender Day of Remembrance

Transgender Day of Remembrance is commemorated on November 20th each year as a day to remember the transgender folks who have been killed as a result of transphobia and hate.  There are way too many of them, and many of the murders remain unsolved.



According to Gwendolyn Ann Smith, the founder of TDOR, “The Transgender Day of Remembrance serves several purposes. It raises public awareness of hate crimes against transgender people, an action that current media doesn’t perform. Day of Remembrance publicly mourns and honors the lives of our brothers and sisters who might otherwise be forgotten. Through the vigil, we express love and respect for our people in the face of national indifference and hatred. Day of Remembrance reminds non-transgender people that we are their sons, daughters, parents, friends and lovers. Day of Remembrance gives our allies a chance to step forward with us and stand in vigil, memorializing those of us who’ve died by anti-transgender violence.”

The 24th Annual Kitsap County Human Rights Conference

This year’s Kitsap County Human Rights Conference is coming up and registration will be underway soon!

Save the date – Friday December 5th, 2014
Kitsap Conference Center, Bremerton, WA

This year’s conference is around the important topic: Breaking the School to Prison Pipeline – Changing the flow for our youth.

2014 HR Conf Save the DateMore information will be on the Kitsap County Council for Human Rights web site:

~ marcie

Missing Robin Williams

Like so many others, I was saddened by the death of Robin Williams. His roles brought such laughter and such depth of thought to all of us, and he will be incredibly missed.

Robin Williams was one my favorite actors. Back in the day, I used to watch Mork and Mindy occasionally, not because I liked the show necessarily, but just to see his humor in action. Over the years he would show up in some unusual roles, even on an episode of Law and Order SVU. I remember seeing him and John Ritter (from Three’s Company) doing a sort of stand-up comedy duet/stand off (I don’t remember the show) and Robin Williams ran comedic circles around John Ritter. He and his talent will be missed.

At first I had planned to say a bit about Robin Williams and his advocacy for the rights of lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender folks. Then the news came out that he had Parkinson’s Disease and that hit close to home for me too. So I will mention both.

Robin Williams was an ally of LGBT folks. He did more than play several gay, and other diverse, characters. According to the Advocate, “Williams supported local efforts by LGBT community groups and was involved in multiple fundraisers and events. “
Link to article:

Parkinson’s Disease is a heartbreaking diagnosis. I have a movement disorder called Essential Tremor, and while there can be some outlying symptoms, the main thing I have to look forward to is shaking more and more as the years go by. Katherine Hepburn is one of many famous people who had Essential Tremor, and it is much more common than Parkinson’s. Folks with Essential Tremor have an increased risk of having Parkinson’s Disease but the connection is not understood. The prognosis for someone with Parkinson’s Disease is much grimmer, but more and more treatments are available.

I can’t know how much the diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease had to do with Robin Williams’ decision to end his life.  I just wish he hadn’t.
RIP Robin Williams.

More about Parkinson’s Disease:

More about Essential Tremor:


~ Marcie


Microaggressions and More at the Olympic College’s Diversity Conference


Olympic College Diversity Conference – Great Job!OCDiversityConfProgam&Bag


Olympic College’s first Diversity Conference was very well done, with so much good thought provoking information I am still processing it all.





What I enjoyed most about the conference were the two keynote speakers: Dr. Joy DeGruy and Yoshiko Harden.

The first keynote speaker was  Dr. Joy DeGruy

From her website: “Dr. Joy DeGruy is a nationally and internationally renowned researcher, educator, author and presenter.”

The topic of her presentation was Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome
From the Olympic College Diversity Conference Program “The theory of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome suggest that centuries of slavery followed by systemic racism and oppression have resulted in mutigenerational adaptive behaviors – some of which have been positive and reflective of resilience, and others that are detrimental and destructive.”

I was enlightened by her presentation and have bought her book on the subject, Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome, America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing.

  The second keynote was given by Yoshiko Harden, Vice President for Diversity at Bellevue College

Her speech title was “Good Intentions Aren’t Enough; The Damaging Effects of Microaggressions”

Microaggression was a new concept to me, and some of you may not be familiar with it either.

From Wikipedia – “Microaggression is a theory that hypothesizes that specific interactions between those of different races, cultures, genders or sexual orientation can be interpreted as small acts of mostly non-physical aggression; the term was coined by Chester M. Pierce[1] in 1970.”

Yoshiko Harden OC Diversity Conf

From the Olympic College Diversity Conference Program: “Often it is well intended, “nice” people who tend to perpetuate microagressions”
According to the speech description “Participants will learn to identify both individual and institutional forms of microagressions, and learn practical and useful strategies to address, interrupt,a nd dismantle them.” Yoshiko Harden’s Keynote speech did all of that for me.




The topic of microaggressions found its way into a couple of the sessions, and I attended two of those.

One of the things I like about the idea of microagressions is it helps make sense of something I have seen and felt, but couldn’t find a way to describe. One thing that comes to mind for me is how I feel when someone says to me “Wow, you are an engineer?!  Good for you!”  (Usually interpreted as ‘you are smart for a woman’) I also like that the concept helps break down our overwhelming anti-inclusion systems into bits we can makes sense of, and find ways to each make a real difference.

There were two videos presented at the conference that showed, in a humorous way, some examples of microagression.

What Kind of Asian Are You? (this video was posted just over a hear ago and has over 7 millions hits)

Top 100 – Things White People Say to Black People




There were so many good sessions, and I was impressed by the presenters.









I look forward to attending the Olympic College Diversity Conference next year!


~ Marcie