This blog is a Kitsap Sun reader blog. The Kitsap Sun neither edits nor previews reader blog posts. Their content is the sole creation and responsibility of the readers who produce them. Reader bloggers are asked to adhere to our reader blog agreement. If you have a concern or would like to start a reader blog of your own, please contact sunnews@kitsapsun.com.

Keep Locker Rooms Safe… By Autumn Bennett

 

https://www.facebook.com/KeepYMCALockerRoomsSafe/?fref=nf

This country has fallen victim to progressivism on many levels, many vehicles are used to drive this agenda, and one that I have become closely involved with is the transgender movement. It seems on the surface to be about acceptance, or the right to use the bathroom, but as I have delved deeper into these types of issues, it has become clear that it is fundamentally something more.

I am what the transgender community calls “cisgender,” meaning my brain connects with my biological sex. I just call myself a woman.

I am also a lead in a group called Keep Locker Rooms Safe and we are working to repeal an ambiguous rule that was pushed onto the state by a group of unelected bureaucrats without consulting the public. This rule allows anyone to use the restroom of their choice. It prevents anyone from saying anything if a man is in the women’s locker room or bathroom. It restricts speech, and endangers the vulnerable. As open opponents of this rule, we are constantly subjected to threats, hate mail, attempts to discredit us, name calling, bullying, outright slander and accusations of hate toward trans people.

Desiring to cross lines, I spent an afternoon having coffee with two trans individuals who had asked to meet with folks who oppose this rule. I looked forward to hearing their concerns and fears and vice versa. The invite seemed sincere, a true desire to hear the other side, to perhaps come to some understanding of one another.

It wasn’t.

Demands were made of me. I was told that I need to renounce my support of legislators who have worked to repeal the rule (I won’t), I was told that I need to publicly say that transwomen are really women (they aren’t). If these demands were not met, this person insisted that it meant that I hate trans people. (I don’t).

I was told that I do not get to decide on the rights of a minority group (I am African American, ironically), I was told that the rights of the minority supersede the majority.

I was called paranoid, bigoted and transphobic (funny, there I sat with two trans people … pretty phobic, I suppose). I was told my safety does not matter, because, per some statistics a transgender person is supposed to be at greater risk of harm than I. I was told that they are at greater risk of harm than little girls who may be caught unawares in a locker room face to face with a grown man.

I was told that I am hateful because I do not want my child or sisters exposed to the genitals of the opposite sex. How dare I make choices for what I want my Child to be exposed to, and when?

The demands that I validate their reality, their “womanness” made me wonder about why they needed my validation. Is it because they know they are not, nor never can, truly be women?

This experience showed me the crushing narcissism of the trans movement, the dictatorial attitude of the trans agenda. It has nothing to do with going to the bathroom or locker room. It has everything to do with forcing EVERYONE to agree with how someone lives their life, up to and including subjugating my beliefs and comfort level and safety. I was now victim of the ultimate bullying; “if you don’t do or think or say this or agree with me, than you hate me and want to hurt me, so now I can justify hating and hurting you.”

It reaffirmed for me that progressive thought does not allow for freedom or growth or liberty. It is the bullying and hammering of one side demanding that everyone agree with them, their subjective reality, under point of gun. If I do not believe that a man who takes hormones and lives like a woman, is suddenly a woman, I am a bigot. Why must I bend to their will or be damned? Why should I pander to subjective reality? I’m done being bullied.

My position is that you live your life as you please, but if you infringe upon my safety or the safety of others, I draw the line. Where are we, as a country, going to draw the line?

Autumn Bennett,

Bremerton.

https://www.facebook.com/KeepYMCALockerRoomsSafe/?fref=nf

Celebrate Rev Martin Luther King, Jr.

American Minute with Bill Federer

“Let us not…satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.” -Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr. was born JANUARY 15, 1929.
In 1983, Republican President Ronald Reagan signed the bill to make the 3rd Monday in January a holiday in honor of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., was a Baptist minister like his father and grandfather.

He was pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery and Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta.
He formed the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1964.

On April 16, 1963, Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., wrote:
“As the Apostle Paul carried the gospel of Jesus Christ…so am I compelled to carry the gospel…”

King continued:
“One day the South will know that when these disinherited children of God sat down at lunch counters they were standing up for what is best in the American dream and for the most sacred values in our Judeo-Christian heritage.”

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as Archbishop Desmond Tutu, were influenced by the German church leader Dietrich Bonhoeffer, who resisted Hitler’s National Socialist Workers’ Party.

Bonhoeffer was himself influenced by the Black preacher, Adam Clayton Powell Sr., pastor of Harlem’s Abyssinian Baptist Church, once the largest Protestant church in America.

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., was also influenced by Henry David Thoreau, who wrote in his book, In Civil Disobedience (1849):
“That government is best which governs least”

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., attended Booker T. Washington High School in Atlanta, 1942-44.
Booker T. Washington founded Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, and wrote in Up From Slavery (1901):

“I resolved that I would permit no man, no matter what his color might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him.
With God’s help, I believe that I have completely rid myself of any ill feeling toward the Southern white man for any wrong that he may have inflicted upon my race…
I pity from the bottom of my heart any individual who is so unfortunate as to get into the habit of holding race prejudice.”
Get the booklet Booker T. Washington – American Hero
Booker T. Washington stated:
“In the sight of God there is no color line, and we want to cultivate a spirit that will make us forget that there is such a line anyway…”
“I have always had the greatest respect for the work of the Salvation Army especially because I have noted that it draws no color line in religion.”

Booker T. Washington wrote in Up From Slavery (1901):
“There is a class of race problem solvers who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public…
Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances because they do not want to lose their jobs… They don’t want the patient to get well…
Great men cultivate love…only little men cherish a spirit of hatred.”

George Washington Carver-His Life and Faith in His Own Words
A professor at Tuskegee was the world renown George Washington Carver, who wrote to Robert Johnson, March 24, 1925:
“Thank God I love humanity; complexion doesn’t interest me one single bit.”

George W. Carver wrote to YMCA official Jack Boyd in Denver, March 1, 1927:
“Keep your hand in that of the Master, walk daily by His side,
so that you may lead others into the realms of true happiness, where a religion of hate, (which poisons both body and soul) will be unknown, having in its place the ‘Golden Rule’ way, which is the ‘Jesus Way’ of life, will reign supreme.”

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., was influenced by the non-violent methods of India’s Mahatma Gandhi.
Gandhi wrote in his autobiography of an incident on a ship with 800 passengers traveling from India to the Natal Province of South Africa. When some passengers learned that Gandhi was aboard, they grew furious.

As Gandhi was disembarking, they punched him, kicked him, and threw stones at him, but he refused to retaliate and kept walking. He was finally rescued when the wife of the town’s police superintendent opened her parasol and stood between Gandhi and the mob.

Gandhi wrote:
“I hope God will give me the courage and the sense to forgive them and to refrain from bringing them to law.
I have no anger against them. I am only sorry for their ignorance and their narrowness.
I know that they sincerely believe that what they are doing today is right and proper. I have no reason therefore to be angry with them.”

On March 6, 1984, President Ronald Reagan remarked at the annual convention of the National Association of Evangelicals, meeting at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Columbus, Ohio:
“During the civil rights struggles of the fifties and early sixties, millions worked for equality in the name of their Creator.
Civil rights leaders like Dr. Martin Luther King based all their efforts on the claim that black or white, each of us is a child of God. And they stirred our nation to the very depths of its soul.”

On January 20, 1997, Rev. Billy Graham delivered the invocation just prior to the second inauguration of President Bill Clinton, stating:
“Oh, Lord, help us to be reconciled first to you and secondly to each other. May Dr. Martin Luther King‘s dream finally come true for all of us.
Help us to learn our courtesy to our fellow countrymen, that comes from the one who taught us that ‘whatever you want me to do to you, do also to them.’

In proclaiming 1990 the International Year of Bible Reading, President George H.W. Bush stated:
“The historic speeches of Abraham Lincoln and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., provide compelling evidence of the role Scripture played in shaping the struggle against slavery and discrimination.”

On February 16, 2002, Dr. James Dobson addressed 3,500 attendees at the National Religious Broadcaster’s convention:
“Those of you who do feel that the church has no responsibility in the cultural area… Suppose it were…1963, and Martin Luther King is sitting in a Birmingham jail and he is released.
And he goes to a church, yes, a church.
And from that church, he comes out into the streets of Birmingham and marches for civil rights. Do you oppose that? Is that a violation of the separation of church and state?”

In his address at Montgomery, Alabama, December 31, 1955, Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., declared:
“If you will protest courageously, and yet with dignity and Christian love, when the history books are written in future generations, the historians will have to pause and say,
‘There lived a great people-a black people-who injected new meaning and dignity into the veins of civilization.'”

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., said August 28, 1963:
“Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all of God’s children…
In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds.
Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.
We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence.

On April 16, 1963, Rev. King wrote:
“I must make two honest confessions to you, my Christian and Jewish brothers… I stand in the middle of two opposing forces in the Negro community.
One is a force of complacency…
The other force is one of bitterness and hatred, and it comes perilously close to advocating violence.

It is expressed in the various black nationalist groups that are springing up across the nation, the largest and best-known being Elijah Muhammad’s Muslim movement…
This movement is made up of people who have lost faith in America, who have absolutely repudiated Christianity, and who have concluded that the white man is an incorrigible ‘devil.’
I have tried to stand between these two forces, saying that we need emulate neither the ‘do-nothingism’ of the complacent nor the hatred of the black nationalist.
For there is the more excellent way of love and non-violent protest.
I am grateful to God that, through the influence of the Negro church, the way of non-violence became an integral part of our struggle.”

Rev. King proclaimed August 28, 1963:
“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed:
‘We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal.’
I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood…
I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character…
I have a dream…where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers.”  American Minute is a registered trademark. Permission is granted to forward, reprint or duplicate with acknowledgement to www.AmericanMinute.com

George W Carver George W. Carver-“where a religion of hate, (which poisons both body & soul) will be unknown

American Minute with Bill Federer

George W. Carver-“…where a religion of hate, (which poisons both body & soul) will be unknown, having in its place the ‘Golden Rule’ way, which is the ‘Jesus Way’ of life.”
George Washington Carver was born a slave during the Civil War, possibly in 1865, but there are no records.

Within a few weeks, his father, who belonged to the next farm over, was killed in a log hauling accident.

Shortly after the Civil War, bushwhackers kidnapped infant George with his mother and sister.

Moses Carver sent friends to track down the thieves and trade his best horse to retrieve them.

The thieves only left baby George, lying on the gr ound, sick with the whooping cough.

George never saw his mother and sister again. Illness claimed the lives of his two other sisters and they were buried on the Carver farm.

George and his older brother, Jim, were raised in Diamond Grove, Missouri, by “Uncle” Moses and “Aunt” Sue Carver, a childless German immigrant couple.

In poor health as a child, George stayed near the house helping with chores, learning to cook, clean, sew, mend and wash laundry, skills that he would later use to support himself.

His recreation was to spend time in the woods.

He left home at eleven and attended school in Neosho, Missouri, paying his own tuition by doing odd jobs.

Get the book George Washington Carver-His Life & Faith in His Own Words

George Carver drifted from Kansas to Iowa, working as a cook and doing laundry.

He studied at Simpson College, then received a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Iowa State, where he was hired as a teacher.

In the Spring of 1896, Booker T. Washington invited George Washington Carver to teach at Tuskegee, as he had just received his Master’s Degree from Iowa State Agricultural Institute:

“Tuskegee Institute seeks to provide education – a means for survival to those who attend. Our students are poor, often starving. They travel miles of torn roads, across years of poverty.

We teach them to read and write, but words cannot fill stomachs. They need to learn how to plant and harvest crops…

I cannot offer you money, position or fame. The first two you have. The last, from the place you now occupy, you will no doubt achieve. These things I now ask you to give up.

I offer you in their place-work-hard, hard work-the challenge of bringing people from degradation, poverty and waste to full manhood.”

On May 16, 1896, George W. Carver responded to Booker T. Washington:

“My dear Sir, I am just in receipt of yours of the 13th inst., and hasten to reply.

I am looking forward to a very busy, pleasant and profitable time at your college and shall be glad to cooperate with you in doing all I can through Christ who strengtheneth me to better the condition of our people.

Some months ago I read your stirring address delivered at Chicago and I said amen to all you said, furthermore you have the correct solution to the ‘race problem’…

Providence permitting, I will be there in November. God bless you and your work, Geo. W. Carver.”

In the fall of 1896, George surprised the staff at Iowa State College by announcing his plans to give up his promising future there and accept Booker T. Washington offer to teach at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

The staff showed their appreciation by purchasing him a going away present, a microscope, which he used extensively throughout his career.

George assembled an Agricultural Department at Tuskegee.

He visited nearby farmers and would teach them farming techniques, such as crop rotation, fertilization and erosion prevention. Carver noticed that the soil was depleted due to years of repeated cotton growth and produced very poorly.

During this time, an insect called the boll weevil swept through the South, destroying cotton crops and leaving farmers devastated.

George showed the farmers the benefits of crop rotation and planting legumes, such as peanuts, which replenish the soil with nitrogen.

Farmers heeded Carver’s advice but soon had more peanuts than the market wanted, as peanuts were primarily used as animal feed. George determined to find more uses for the peanut to increase the market for them.

Carver is credited with discovering and/or popularizing hundreds of uses for the peanut, soybean, sweet potato, pecan, cowpea, wild plum, and okra revolutionizing the South’s economy.

A partial list of items derived from peanuts was compiled by the Carver Museum at Tuskegee:

BEVERAGES: blackberry punch, cherry punch, lemon punch, orange punch, peanut punch, beverage for ice cream, evaporated peanut beverage; dry coffee, instant coffee, 32 different kinds of milk, dehydrated milk flakes, buttermilk.

FOODS: peanut butter, salted peanuts, peanut flour, peanut flakes, peanut meal, cream from peanut milk, butter from peanut milk, egg yolk, breakfast food, bisque powder, cheese, cream cheese, cheese pimento, cheese sandwich, cheese tutti frutti, cocoa, crystallized peanuts, curds, granulated potatoes, potato nibs, golden nuts, mock coconut, pancake flour, peanut hearts, peanut surprise, peanut wafers, pickle, sweet pickle, shredded peanuts, substitute asparagus.

George Washington Carver-His Life & Faith in His Own Words

George Washington Carver addressed Congress and met with Presidents Teddy Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge and Franklin Roosevelt.

He was offered jobs by Henry Ford and Thomas Edison, and received correspondence from world leaders, including Gandhi and Stalin.

George Washington Carver died JANUARY 5, 1943.

In 1928, Dr. Carver stated:

“Human need is really a great spiritual vacuum which God seeks to fill… With one hand in the hand of a fellow man in need and the other in the hand of Christ, He could get across the vacuum…Then the passage, ‘I can do all things through Christ which strengthens me,’ came to have real meaning.”

In the summer of 1920, the Young Men’s Christian Association of Blue Ridge, North Carolina, invited Professor Carver to speak at their summer school for the southern states.

Dr. Willis D. Weatherford, President of Blue Ridge, introduced him as the speaker.

With his high voice surprising the audience, Dr. Carver exclaimed humorously:

“I always look forward to introductions as opportunities to learn something about myself….”

He continued:

“Years ago I went into my laboratory and said, ‘Dear Mr. Creator, please tell me what the universe was made for?’

The Great Creator answered, ‘You want to know too much for that little mind of yours. Ask for something more your size, little man.’

Then I asked, ‘Please, Mr. Creator, tell me what man was made for.’

Again the Great Creator replied, ‘You are still asking too much. Cut down on the extent and improve the intent.’

So then I asked, ‘Please, Mr. Creator, will you tell me why the peanut was made?’

‘That’s better, but even then it’s infinite. What do you want to know about the peanut?’

‘Mr. Creator, can I make milk out of the peanut?’

‘What kind of milk do you want? Good Jersey milk or just plain boarding house milk?’

‘Good Jersey milk.’

And then the Great Creator taught me to take the peanut apart and put it together again. And out of the process have come forth all these products!”

Among the numerous products displayed was a bottle of good Jersey milk. Three and-a-half ounces of peanuts produced one pint of rich milk or one quart of raw “skim” milk, called boarding house “blue john” milk.

On November 19, 1924, Carver spoke to over 500 people at the Women’s Board of Domestic Missions:

“God is going to reveal to us things He never revealed before if we put our hands in His. No books ever go into my laboratory. The thing I am to do and the way are revealed to me the moment I am inspired to create something new.

Without God to draw aside the curtain, I would be helpless. Only alone can I draw close enough to God to discover His secrets.”

On March 24, 1925, Carver wrote to Robert Johnson, an employee of Chesley Enterprises of Ontario:

“Thank God I love humanity; complexion doesn’t interest me one single bit.”

Though from a disadvantaged background, George did not let this pull him down into harboring self-pity and bitterness, or yielding to a hateful victim-hood mentality.

On March 1, 1927, George W. Carver wrote to Jack Boyd, a YMCA official in Denver, CO:

My beloved friend, keep your hand in that of the Master, walk daily by His side, so that you may lead others into the realms of true happiness, where a religion of hate, (which poisons both body and soul) will be unknown,

having in its place the ‘Golden Rule’ way, which is the ‘Jesus Way’ of life, will reign supreme…

Then, we can walk and talk with Jesus momentarily, because we will be attuned to His will and wishes… God, my beloved friend is infinite the highest embodiment of love.

We are finite, surrounded and often filled with hate. We can only understand the infinite as we loose the finite and take on the infinite.”

This was also the attitude of Booker T. Washington, who wrote in Up From Slavery (1901):

“It is now long ago that I learned this lesson from General Samuel Chapman Armstrong, and resolved that I would permit no man, no
matter what his color might be , to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him.

With God’s help, I believe that I have completely rid myself of any ill feeling toward the Southern white man for any wrong that he may have inflicted upon my race.

I am made to feel just as happy now when I am rendering service to Southern white men as when the service is rendered to a member of my own race.

I pity from the bottom of my heart any individual who is so unfortunate as to get into the habit of holding race prejudice.

On July 10, 1924, George Washington Carver wrote to James Hardwick:

“God cannot use you as He wishes until you come into the fullness of His Glory. Do not get alarmed, my friend, when doubts creep in. That is old Satan. Pray, pray, pray.

Oh, my friend, I am praying that God will come in and rid you entirely of self so you can go out after souls right, or rather have souls seek the Christ in you. This is my prayer for you always.”
American Minute is a registered trademark. Permission is granted to forward, reprint or duplicate with acknowledgement to www.AmericanMinute.com

Coach Kennedy Once Again , Human Rights and Human Wrongs

Coach Kennedy once again makes National Headlines because of his recent announcement to take on the Bremerton School District in Court regarding his termination because of his praying at the 50 Yard line .

http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/local/coach-kennedy-files-official-complaint-against-bremerton-school-district-26f3e43d-3145-7fd7-e053-010-362457461.html

The past 60 years has seen a reverse in how religious freedom is defended , it is not defended in the courts as it once was . The recent debate in states about the religious freedom bills was seen as an attempt to discriminate against homosexuals , that is another debate but the Federal version was actually the act of a bi partisan legislature who agreed that religious freedom has been taking a beating as of late and needed support .

 

 

Lack of respect for religious beliefs today  is seen as persecution by some miss guided believers in my opinion , actually we are having a greater impact on our culture from secular world views today is the real issue . Academia sees itself once again in the age of enlightenment . This can appear as some one being against you if your views differ. Just as Traditional Marriage was never about being anti gay , supporting secular views being anti Christian is often not the case . Most people are not anti God , they really just don’t have God on their radar                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               . Since almost all  religious speech is denied according to our courts today it claims neutrality  because it discriminates equally .  I have noticed the longer this view has been accepted , the more hostile religion has become politically and the hostility of non religious views pushing agendas have become more uncivil also . Seeing religion as the opposition to their secular politics and world views has cause many people who may be normally just un concerned about religious beliefs see them as the enemy because of political resistance . . .

Often the sides seem to support religious discrimination by gay activists and those  atheists with a strong commitment to supporting freedom from religion .  Many are in the middle and just are neutral on the whole subject . Coach Kennedy supporters seem to be made of devout Catholics and Evangelicals . The Sun Newspaper has seen an incredible amount of people from atheist world views making comments .It has become a national issue .

I found myself supporting this coach , not because of the law but because of the hostility he is facing . The attacks are down right sadistic at times , and to offer a view contrary will result in religious beliefs being compared to ignorance and so much worse.   I read comments supporting the Human Right Conference and read the same person right after commenting on the Sun mocking this person praying . I see a dis connect in how we respect others based on the categories they are seen to be in . Those who claim free thought and logic I would think would notice this more . Almost as if  non belief has become a religion itself  and puts a veil over their eyes in looking at the issue clearly .   Seems the coach could be wrong but that should not necessitate a need to mock his sincerity or ridicule his religious beliefs . The District may be wrong , but obviously they were also concerned of other voices and controversy .

Religion needs to get out of politics and folks need to lighten up on the free expression of religion .

I pray out of His glorious riches He may strengthen you with power through His Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your heart through faith. And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the saints, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge~~that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God. Ephesians 3:16~19

New Religious Freedom Group In Kitsap

New Facebook Page recently has started up in Kitsap County dealing with Religious Liberty . There are no Human Rights Organizations In Kitsap that are dealing with religious issues and it fills a void .  Recent Attention made aware many  in the community just how hateful aspects of our community have become to religion and religious liberty .

 

Hostile  attacks ,  cartons of private male body parts of a coach in Bremerton  ,  hostile memes released by organizations supporting atheism also have been circulating  in regards to the Bremerton Coach who publically Thanked God for the safety of His players after every game  at the 50 yard line .  Religious beliefs linking ignorance with the belief of the Virgin Birth , Many  celebrate this  during Christmas as do the students  in our public schools .  . Followers of religious beliefs  have been  linked to greed , agendas,  racists , bigots , hypocrites  recently on social media    Religious Liberty Kitsap already has   300 members .

Religious Liberty Kitsap

Happy Birthday America

Pray for our President and leaders. Pray for America .

American Minute with Bill Federer
“THE GREATEST REVOLUTION that has ever taken place IN THE WORLD’S HISTORY” -Reagan

38-year-old King George III ruled the largest empire that planet earth had ever seen.

The Declaration of Independence, approved JULY 4, 1776, listed the reasons why Americans declared their independence from the King:

“He has made judges dependent on his will alone…

He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of officers to harass our people and eat out their substance.

He has kept among us, in times of peace, standing armies…

To subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution…

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us…

For imposing taxes on us without our consent…

For depriving us in many cases, of the benefit of trial by jury…

For…establishing…an arbitrary government…

For…altering fundamentally the forms of our governments…

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.

He is at this time transporting large armies of foreign mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation, and tyranny…

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian savages whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions…”

33-year-old Thomas Jefferson’s original rough draft of the Declaration contained a line condemning slavery:

“He has waged cruel war against human nature itself…in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither…

suppressing every legislative attempt to prohibit or to restrain this execrable commerce determining to keep open a market where MEN should be bought and sold.”

A few delegates objected, and since the Declaration needed to pass unanimously and time was running short with the British invading New York, the line condemning slavery was unfortunately omitted.

John Hancock, the 39-year-old President of the Continental Congress, signed the Declaration first, reportedly saying “the price on my head has just doubled.”

Next to sign was Secretary, Charles Thomson, age 47.

70-year-old Benjamin Franklin said:

“We must hang together or most assuredly we shall hang separately.

The Declaration referred to God:

“Laws of Nature and of NATURE’S GOD…

All Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their CREATOR with certain unalienable Rights…

Appealing to the SUPREME JUDGE OF THE WORLD for the rectitude of our intentions…”

“And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of DIVINE PROVIDENCE, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor.”

Get the book America’s God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations

Many of the 56 signers sacrificed their prosperity for their posterity.

Of the Signers:

11 had their homes destroyed;
5 were hunted and captured;
17 served in the military; and
9 died during the war.

27-year-old George Walton signed, and at the Battle of Savannah was wounded and captured.

Signers Edward Rutledge, age 27, Thomas Heyward, Jr., age 30, and Arthur Middleton, age 34, were made prisoners at the Siege of Charleston.

38-year-old signer Thomas Nelson had his home used as British headquarters during the siege of Yorktown. Nelson reportedly offered five guineas to the first man to hit his house.

Signer Carter Braxton, age 40, lost his fortune during the war.

42-year-old signer Thomas McKean wrote that he was “hunted like a fox by the enemy, compelled to remove my family five times in three month.”

46-year-old Richard Stockton signed and was dragged from his bed at night and jailed.

50-year-old signer Lewis Morris had his home taken and used as a barracks.

50-year-old signer Abraham Clark had two sons tortured and imprisoned on the British starving ship Jersey.

More Americans died on British starving ships than died in battle during the Revolution.

53-year-old signer John Witherspoon’s son, James, was killed in the Battle of Germantown.

60-year-old signer Philip Livingston lost several properties to British occupation and died before the war ended.

63-year-old signer Francis Lewis had his wife imprisoned and treated so harshly, she died shortly after her release.

65-year-old signer John Hart had his home looted and had to remain in hiding, dying before the war ended.

41-year-old John Adams wrote to his wife of the Declaration:

“I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated, by succeeding generations, as the great anniversary Festival.

It ought to be commemorated, as the Day of Deliverance by SOLEMN ACTS OF DEVOTION TO GOD ALMIGHTY.

It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shews, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this time forward forever more.”

Gustave de Beaumont, a contemporary of Alexis de Tocqueville, wrote in Marie ou L’Esclavage aux E’tas-Unis, 1835:

“I have seen a meeting of the Senate in Washington open with a prayer, and the anniversary festival of the Declaration of Independence consists, in the United States, of an entirely religious ceremony.”

John Adams continued in his letter to his wife:

“You will think me transported with enthusiasm but I am not.

I am well aware of the toil and blood and treasure, that it will cost us to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States.

Yet through all the gloom I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory. I can see that the end is more than worth all the means.

And that Posterity will triumph in that Days Transaction, even although we should rue it, which I trust in God We shall not.”

When 54-year-old Samuel Adams signed the Declaration, he said:

“We have this day restored THE SOVEREIGN to whom all men ought to be obedient. He reigns in heaven and from the rising to the setting of the sun, let His kingdom come.”

34-year-old James Wilson signed the Declaration. He later signed the Constitution and was appointed to Supreme Court by George Washington. James Wilson stated in 1787:

“After a period of 6,000 years since creation, the United States exhibit to the world THE FIRST INSTANCE of a nation…assembling voluntarily…and deciding…that system of government under which they and their posterity should live.”

Senator Daniel Webster stated in 1802:

“Miracles do not cluster, and what has HAPPENED ONCE IN 6,000 YEARS, may not happen again. Hold on to the Constitution, for if the American Constitution should fail, there will be anarchy throughout the world.”

John Jay was President of the Continental Congress, 1778-1779, and later nominated by George Washington to be the First Chief Justice of Supreme Court. John Jay wrote in 1777:

“The Americans are THE FIRST PEOPLE whom Heaven has favored with an opportunity of…choosing the forms of government under which they should live. All other constitutions have derived their existence from violence or accidental circumstances.”

America’s God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations

Yale President Ezra Stiles, 1788:

“All the forms of civil polity have been tried by mankind, except one: and that seems to have been reserved in Providence to be realized in America.”

At the time of the Revolutionary War, nearly every other country on Earth was ruled by a king.

Dr. Pat Robertson wrote in America’s Dates with Destiny, 1986:

“On September 17, 1787, the day our Constitution was signed, the absolute monarch Ch’ien Lung, emperor of the Manchu (or Ch’ing) Dynasty, reigned supreme over the people of China…Revolts were put down by ruthless military force.

In Japan the shogun (warriors) of the corrupt Tokugawa chamberlain Tanuma Okitsugu exercised corrupt and totalitarian authority over the Japanese.

In India, Warren Hastings, the British Governor of Bengal, had successfully defeated the influence of the fragmented Mogul dynasties that ruled India since 1600.

Catherine II was the enlightened despot of all the Russias.

Joseph II was the emperor of Austria, Bohemia and Hungary.

For almost half a century, Frederick the Great had ruled Prussia.

Louis XVI sat uneasily on his throne in France just years away from revolution, a bloody experiment in democracy, and the new tyranny of Napoleon Bonaparte.

A kind of a constitutional government had been created in the Netherlands in 1579 by the Protestant Union of Utrecht, but that constitution was really a loose federation of the northern provinces for a defense against Catholic Spain…

What was happening in America had no real precedent, even as far back as the city-states of Greece.

The only real precedent was established thousands of years before by the tribes of Israel in the covenant with God and with each other.”

President Theodore Roosevelt stated in 1903:

“In NO other place and at NO other time has the experiment of government of the PEOPLE, by the PEOPLE, for the PEOPLE, been tried on so vast a scale as here in our own country.”

President Calvin Coolidge stated in 1924:

“The history of government on this earth has been almost entirely…rule of force held in the HANDS OF A FEW. Under our Constitution, America committed itself to power in the HANDS OF THE PEOPLE.”

America is a republic where THE PEOPLE get to rule themselves. If an American disrespects the flag, what that person is in effect saying is that they no longer want to be king. They want someone else to rule their life – which is the definition of slavery.

Ronald Reagan opened the Ashbrook Center, Ashland, Ohio, May 9, 1983:

“From their own harsh experience with intrusive, overbearing government, the Founding Fathers made a great breakthrough in political understanding:

They understood that it is the excesses of government, the will to power of one man over another, that has been a principle source of injustice and human suffering through the ages.

The Founding Fathers understood that only by MAKING GOVERNMENT THE SERVANT, not the master, only by positing SOVEREIGNTY in THE PEOPLE and not the state can we hope to protect freedom and see the political commonwealth prosper.

In 1776 the source of government excess was the crown’s abuse of power and its attempt to suffocate the colonists with its overbearing demands. In our own day, the danger of too much state power has taken a subtler but no less dangerous form.”

John Adams wrote in his notes on A Dissertation on Canon & Feudal Law, 1765:

“I always consider the settlement of America…as the opening of a grand scene and design in Providence for…the emancipation of the slavish part of mankind all over the earth.”

Franklin Roosevelt stated in 1939:

“Rulers…increase their power over the common men. The seamen they sent to find gold found instead the way of escape for the common man from those rulers…

What they found over the Western horizon was not the silk and jewels of Cathay…but MANKIND’S SECOND CHANCE – a chance to create a new world after he had almost spoiled an old one…

The Almighty seems purposefully to have withheld that SECOND CHANCE until the time when men would most need and appreciate liberty.”

Ronald Reagan stated 1961:

“In this country of ours took place THE GREATEST REVOLUTION that has ever taken place IN THE WORLD’S HISTORY – Every other revolution simply exchanged one set of rulers for another…

Here for THE FIRST TIME in all the THOUSANDS OF YEARS of man’s relation to man…the founding fathers established the idea that you and I had within ourselves the GOD-GIVEN RIGHT AND ABILITY to DETERMINE OUR OWN DESTINY.”

British Edwardian writer G.K. Chesterton stated in “What is America”:

“America is the ONLY NATION IN THE WORLD that is founded on creed. That creed is set forth…in the Declaration of Independence..

that all men are equal in their claim to justice, that governments exist to give them that justice…

It certainly does condemn…atheism, since it clearly names the CREATOR as the ultimate authority from whom these equal rights are derived.”

Calvin Coolidge stated July 5, 1926:

“THE PRINCIPLES…which went into the Declaration of Independence… are found in… THE SERMONS… of the early colonial clergy…

They preached equality because they believed in the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man. They justified freedom by the text that we are all created in the Divine image.”

Henry Cabot Lodge, who filled the role of the first Senate Majority Leader, warned the U.S. Senate in 1919:

“The United States is the world’s best hope… Beware how you trifle with your marvelous inheritance… for if we stumble and fall, freedom and civilization everywhere will go down in ruin.”

America’s God and Country

Search AMERICAN MINUTE archives

Watch past FAITH IN HISTORY episodes for FREE

Bill Federer www.AmericanMinute.com

News from AmericanMinute.com

Invite Bill Federer to speak – large or small groups – email wjfederer@gmail.com or call 314-502-8924

Visit the American Minute archive

Click here to shop AMERICAN MINUTE store

Daily Reading at:
http://www.biblegateway.com/reading-plans/old-new-testament/today?version=NKJV

Receive American Minute on your Facebook wall, Twitter feed, or RSS reader.

Click here to make a donation. Thank you!

Invite Bill Federer to speak
wjfederer@gmail.com 314-502-8924

American Minute is a registered trademark. Permission is granted to forward. reprint or duplicate with acknowledgement to vwww.AmericanMinute.com

Like us on FacebookFollow us on Twitter

Flag Day

On June 14, Americans celebrate the adoption of the first national flag. Also known as the “Stars and Stripes” or “Old Glory,” the first American flag was approved by the Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. In 1818, after 5 more states joined the Union, Congress passed legislation fixing the number of stripes at 13 and requiring that the number of stars equal the number of states.

In 1983, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed Flag Day with these words:

Two years after the Battle of Bunker Hill, the Continental Congress chose a flag which, tellingly, expressed the unity and resolve of the patriots who had banded together to seek independence. The delegates voted “that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field representing a new constellation.”

Two centuries later, with the addition of thirty-seven stars, this flag still symbolizes our shared commitment to freedom and equality. It carriers a message of hope to the downtrodden, opportunity to the oppressed, and peace to all mankind.

As challenges face our Nation today, the “Stars and Stripes” continues to remind each of us of the sacrifices and determination which built this Nation. It signals the great land of opportunity that our forefathers carved out of the wilderness and gave their lives to make free so many years ago.

Now it is our responsibility to remember the great price that has been paid to keep our flag flying free today and our privilege to ensure that it will keep flying free for future generations.

Friday, 6/19/15 – Citizen Stewardship Training…

http://www.fpiw.org/citizen-stewardship-training/

June 2015 Interim of Engagement Opportunities
Click or scroll down for more information about these featured trainings

Friday, 6/19/15 – Citizen Stewardship Training, Bremerton

Tuesday, 6/30/15 – Olympia 101, Washington State Capitol

CitizenStewarship

FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 2015
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Click here for a printable flyer
Crossroads Neighborhood Church

7555 Old Military Rd, NE, Bremerton, WA 98311
About the FPIW Citizen Stewardship Training

The intent of the training is to foster a lifestyle of citizen stewardship and Jesus-style servant leadership that is motivated for the long term by ones love for God and neighbor, and not the dictates of a civic calendar or the cares of this world.

This training is for your if:
You’re ready to make a meaningful, lasting difference in Washington State
Your biblical worldview sparks a passion for truth and the culture
You want to learn how to equip, inform and edify others in your community and church family, biblically
You want to learn how to effectively navigate your State Government and the people who serve there
This is NOT a political training.

This training combines key components from three of the Family Policy Institute of Washington signature trainings, Olympia 101, Olympia 301, and Church Liaison, all rooted in discipleship and, in the purest sense, “equipping the saints for every good work.” In other words, everything taught can be applied to any spiritual call or gift administered in any arena. Read more …

This training is offered FREE of charge.

Please make every effort to join us for the inaugural 2015 Legislative Interim

FPIW Citizen Stewardship Training

FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 2015
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Click here for a printable flyer

Crossroads Neighborhood Church

7555 Old Military Rd, NE, Bremerton, WA 98311

No childcare. Light refreshments will be provided.

REGISTER FOR THIS FPIW CITIZEN STEWARDSHIP TRAINING

http://www.fpiw.org/citizen-stewardship-training/

Olympia101

Citizen Orientation Training
Washington State Capitol, Olympia
TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2015
8:30 AM to 11:45 AM and 1:00 PM to 4:15 PM
Both trainings are the same. You do not need to attend both.

REGISTER FOR YOUR OLYMPIA 101 INTERIM TRAINING
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1fIGi0pc21Eg1pbQDHyVwrOJQVymqAw3Zt6OzxUBNacg/viewform

Balanced On the Edge, Ready to Fall?

Balanced On the Edge, Ready to Fall?

Discussion and news articles have, as of late, undertaken a debate that addresses a seemingly benign cultural trend in the west: “Is religion necessary to being ‘good’?” The Los Angeles Times rousing debate on Facebook asking this question quickly descended into malice, slander, and judging by the reckless threats messaged back and forth, which would have turned violent had the participants been face-to-face.

The dialogue definitely put a damper on viewers looking for an able defense of that “good” existing healthily apart from religion.

Experts du jour are waxing philosophical about the brave new world of objective agnosticism or humane atheism being a natural by-product in human evolution. Faith and belief in a god or creator is assertively diminished or even derided in schools of higher learning and in much of the current media culture.

Eskil-Ronningsbakken-1000ft-balancing-15

While the debate over whether religion is essential to being “good” as the current society deems the definition to be, religious belief has certainly played a central role in history thus far.

Religion and faith has been the primary moral arbiter alongside philosophy in every society, both being used to address the inner man’s desire for, and examination of, a moral construct for the good of society.

Humanism and atheism asserts that goodness and moral care for fellow man is possible without objective truth in God or adherence to the tenets of a religion based on belief in a creator who dictates original truth. Since man makes up a belief in God, he is the one actually creating the moral concept of good and evil.

Cultural traditions of just what is “good” do have their sources, and what society determines as good or bad is the morality that affects and determines culture. Philosophically, the idea of “objective truth” has in the past provided the overarching security-providing framework of non-negotiables.

A universal truth outside man’s subjective nature offered moral certitude that every man could submit to and unite under. Now this concept has been roundly dismissed and diminished in academia and is no longer being taught as a determinate for moral constructs or boundaries.

After all, if there is no God and we are a product of random chance, then there is no objective truth outside obvious large ones; the sun rises in the east, etc.”Truth” is subject to man’s ever-changing whims.

The repercussions of accepting subjective truth as the new moral marker for mankind is predictable chaos. The unifying force of an agreed-upon moral truth has been replaced by a jumble of fractured truths; large-scale consensus deconstructed into small, ever-changing and often conflicting attempts at consensus. And that is the word to describe the self-willed chaos: deconstruction.

Deconstruction is underway, lamented by those original “me generation” deconstructionists who are now experiencing the remorse only someone sitting in the rubble of their own making can understand.

Educators, psychologists, and sociologists are now issuing dire warnings of social ruin that former sociologists and educators advocated as progressive ideologies not two decades ago. Western culture is now seeing a more serious fall-out of the change in perceptions of moral truth.

truth

The concern with the breakdown of societal order has society questioning what is truth and what is moral as it translates to behaviors and how behaviors are being affected by the eroding structure. The changing ideas of morality in the minds where “knowing” (what is right and wrong) is not translating into “doing” (acting upon what you know to be right or wrong) as effectively as it has in the past when moral constructs were more universal and encouraged in developing humans.

Several studies examine this link and the variables involved with the connections between intention and behavior. Haidt (2003) defines moral emotions as those “that are linked to the interests or welfare either of society as a whole or at least of persons other than the judge or agent” (p. 276). Moral emotions provide the motivational force—the power and energy— to do good and to avoid doing bad (Kroll & Egan 2004).

A much more serious level of deconstruction has been achieved, and psychologists are rightly concerned. The connections between “knowing” and “doing” have been all but severed or are manifesting serious interruption in the relationship between emotion and action. Where once the examination was in levels of responses between emotion and action, there is now being noted an absence or critical disconnect.

Humans in western society are experiencing a loss of ability to make moral judgments of critical behavioral actions and, worse, a loss of emotional compulsion to experience empathy or understand it as a connecting emotion needed for positive societal function within groups.

To put it simply, there are no more moral standards understood or comprehended by an emerging group of youth and young adults in order to “know” and “do” in a way that maintains social order.

Is it too late? Spiritually speaking, never. Culturally speaking, maybe.  A vacuum has been created by the rejection of external and universal truth. It has not been filled adequately by subjective truth, and moral relativism has not only failed to stem the growth of the black hole that the next generation is being pulled into, it has grown it and deepened its pull.

As the peril sharpens and clarifies the need for a strong moral awakening, the Church, more than ever, needs to step up and share Her stable and unchanging morality based upon love. Love for mankind, a love that grows hearts, retrains minds, and re-establishes timeless truths that offer comfort, direction and a future.

the-center-cannot-hold

Western society is at a critical juncture that Christ’s followers must, in obedience to His mission, “Be ready” as Paul said, “ in season and out, to give an answer for the hope that lies within” (I Peter 3.15). With western thought’s ideals of virtues now an unknown to many, it is critical that they be re-introduced into society with passion and force.

The challenge that deconstruction is creating to morality’s framework can only be answered now by the church. It is too far gone for frightened relativists to make right, and it is a golden time for the Church to flex her might in leading the way out of the decline and prevent a fall that need not happen.

If the modern Church only grasped the absolute power at her fingertips to transform the world (as the early Church seemed to understand), there would be no time wasted. The Church operates under the authority which has assured mankind that “the gates of hell will NOT prevail.”

She just needs to share it and do so by shouting out Christ’s love from the rooftops and on the street corners. The battle for the souls of men has never been more gripping, more violent, and more precious.

    Carol

Author: Carolyn Schuster
Carolyn Schuster resides in the Seattle area, married 35 years with 5 adult children. former co-owner/creator of one of the first digital publishing houses, now devoted to serving in her church and examining issues that affect faith and culture.

yn Schuster

Carolyn Schuster resides in the Seattle area, married 35 years with 5 adult children. former co-owner/creator of one of the first digital publishing houses, now devoted to serving in her church and examining issues that affect faith and culture.

 

Chester Nez Last Code Talker Passes Away

Chester Nez the last surviving member of the original 29 Navajo Code Talkers has passed away . The  Navajo Code Talkers developed a code that was used to communicate with American Forces during the war in the Pacific with the Japanese Empire .  It was instrumental in quickening the wars end , saving countless lives.

 

The language itself was almost completely taken away from the Navajo as it was policy for all native languages in this country . US Government Policy once was to force Natives to give up cultural traditions and language . Forcing children to attend schools away from their homes , this was policy of the United Government and religious groups participated . Ironically the same language attempted to be stripped away was used to fight in our war against fascism and totalitarianism.

 

The 29 code talkers returned home to their reservation after the war  with little or no recognition for their contributions .

 Chester Nez and four other code walkers finally  received medals in 2001 .

 

Have often seen the sins of our nation become so emphasized we forget the patriotism and love of freedom that has allowed this country to flourish and become a beacon for freedom and rights .  Well meaning or some with political aspirations use it as a mechanism to divide not unite .    These men  stepped up to plate as true patriots, using the language they hid secretly among themselves ,  helped us quicken the end of war in the Pacific . They saved American lives . As so many Americans have throughout our history , from different walks of life , religions , cultures, and races .

 

God Bless America and today we thank all those veterans and their families who have allowed the time to move forward in this great nation .

 

http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/arizona/2014/06/04/arizona-navajo-code-talker-dies-nez/9965201/