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Recipes, resources and food inspiration from people and places in Kitsap County. By Kitsap Sun Web Editor Angela Dice.
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Posts Tagged ‘poulsbo’

Poulsbo Farmers Market to stay open into December

Friday, July 1st, 2011

Poulsbo market goers will be able to buy local goods through December.

The Poulsbo Farmers Market association announced last week that they would remain open through Dec. 17, and likely will open earlier next year, said market manager Brian Simmons.

The market this year already had opened earlier than in years past on April 9.

“We’ve been talking about it for quite a while now,” Simmons said.

They polled farmers and other vendors and have discussed a year-round farmers market with the Kitsap Community and Agriculture Alliance.

The market also has been in talks with the city and the Port of Poulsbo to gain support for a covered, permanent location for a year-round farmers market in Poulsbo.

Thus far, no decisions have been made on that front.

“We can’t pay retail rent … we need a special situation,” Simmons said.

Which can be a tough sell in this economy. But Simmons said some ideas being floated include a structure that could be used as shopper-friendly covered parking when the market isn’t open.

For now, the market is focused on being open for 10 months out of the year, Simmons said.

This autumn, the market will remain at the spot at Seventh Avenue and Iverson Street.

Market organizers are discussing ways to modify the site to make shopping easier on cold and rainy days, perhaps by clustering tents or offering a heated tent to offer shoppers relief.

The late market is likely to be smaller, Simmons said, and it may open later as daylight hours wane.

With an early heads-up, participating farmers may have time to sow cool-weather crops such as spinach, kales and chard, onions potatoes and winter squashes.

Since fall is slaughter season, the market also hopes to draw meat vendors.

And crafters and people who make preserved goods also will have a chance to sell wares as the holiday shopping season kicks into gear.


Food news roundup: restaurant news, Fourth of July grilling

Friday, July 1st, 2011

Kitsap News

The restaurant action, it seems, is on Bainbridge Island. Recently chef and food writer Greg Atkinson announced that he would open a restaurant on the island. Kitsap Sun’s reporter Rachel Pritchett talked with him about it for a story on Monday. By Wednesday, news had surfaced that Hitchcock, whose locally focused fine dining fare has been lauded by area food critics, may expand into the space next door, according to Bainbridge Conversation’s Tristan Baurick.

At Poulsbo’s farmers market on Saturday, Chef Tomas Nevarez, owner of the in-home chef instruction company Simmer Down will demonstrate creating a meal with locally harvested foods.

At Bainbridge Farmers Market, fstopcafé will offer a coffee roasting demonstration and tea tastings and a talk on tea.

Other Northwest News

Seattle Beerfest started Friday. The annual, often crowded, convention for beer geeks at Seattle Center promises 130 brews on tap. It opens at noon Saturday and Sunday. Cost is $25

I missed this last week, but apparently of note is that Seattle’s food scene is better than Portland’s, according to Sunset Magazine, which pitted top cities against each other. Hmmm, I envision a Portlandia episode in the making.

And now, I’m cutting this short so I can get to …

Fourth of July

Northwest weather guru Cliff Mass predicts that the holiday will get off to a cloudy start, but will sun up by the afternoon with temperatures in the mid-70s. That means, of course, prime grilling weather. Every food magazine out there has grilling guides and suggestions.

Personally, I’m not a fan of making all the food red, white and blue (that’s what decorations are for), but there are some more subtle colored-food touches such as red, white and blue potatoes as suggested by Bainbridge Farmers Market, or maybe a little blueberry, raspberry cobbler.

Coincidentally, as the Sea Life blog’s Jeff Adams reminded readers, this weekend also is open to crabbing season and “crabs are as Northwest’erican as espresso and apple pie,” he said. You can grill crab, though some suggest that (after cleaning it, of course) that you lightly wrap it in foil. Crab can be easy to overcook, so be gentle.

From the Food Life recipe archives (which I realize is a bit anemic), I can suggest Peruvian kebabs with roasted yellow pepper sauce, perhaps accompanied by grilled corn on the cob and for dessert, grilled nectarines with berry sauce, though blueberries may make a more seasonally friendly accompaniment than blackberries.

Also of note from the fine food publications out there, Saveur magazine this year offered a grilling guide that included a half dozen barbecue sauce recipes from Dr. Pepper sauce to Carolina gold, briskets and hush puppy or pickled sides (holy wow, why aren’t I eating right now?!). Southern Living boasts the “ultimate” grilling guide. And for those who want fewer calories, Cooking Light also has a Fourth of July recipe compilation.

As always, fell free to share any other suggestions you have for celebratory eating on the Fourth! Hope you all eat (and/or drink) well and stay safe!

 


Weeklong events celebrate Kitsap beer

Monday, June 20th, 2011

It was a fortuitous coincidence that sent us to tasting rooms at some of Poulsbo’s newest breweries. Not only did I learn that Slippery Pig now has a tasting area open (and also apparently a fine Dandelion Bitter and Rhubarb Pale Ale), but also that last weekend kicked off the weeklong Kitsap Hopstock.

Sadly, I missed a chance to tell you about Der Blokken’s dinner (that I missed too) last Saturday, but there will be plenty of other events going on this week. Various bars will have specials and add local brews to their lineups.

Some highlights:

From 5 to 7 tonight, Tizley’s Europub in downtown Poulsbo hosts a meet-and-greet with local brewers, after which they all head down to Marina Market for a “Throwdown!” to pit local beers against international bestsellers.

On Wednesday, Poulsbo Pub crawl with 4-ounce tasters of local beers at a dozen spots around town.

On Saturday, Stone Crow in Bremerton (on Sylvan Way at Wheaton) will have a pig roast, classic cars and  specials on local beers.

On Sunday, Slippery Pig will host what seems to be a big backyard barbecue including a $5 badminton tournament with prizes. The tasting area will be open and a grill will be on for anyone who wants to bring and grill their own meat.

A list of all events are available at kitsaphopstock.com.

 


Crimson Cove opens Poulsbo storefront to sell smoked goods

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

People who walked around downtown Poulsbo during Viking Fest last weekend may have noticed a new store on Front Street. Crimson Cove, which has been selling smoked salmon, smoked cheeses, nuts and other goods at area farmers markets during the past few years has opened a storefront.

Mark and Jody DeSalvo began selling smoked goods in 2007. They use alder and apple woods to smoke their goods from a building in Kingston.

The store, next to Sluy’s Bakery, has the same salmon and the variety of cheeses from blue to swiss that they’ve sold at farmers and other area markets as well as smoked salts, nuts, dips, crackers and salsas so boaters at Poulsbo marina can take back enough snacks for a day on the water. Plus, they have samples.


Poulsbo farmers market’s opening day packed

Sunday, April 10th, 2011

Weather predictions through the week seemed to bode ill for the opening of Kitsap markets (Poulsbo and Bainbridge) on Saturday. But on the actual opening day itself, gray steeled the sky, but luck held the rain at bay.

Caleb Heinig of Colinwood Farm of Port Townsend sells greens to a customer during openign day at Poulsbo Farmers Market.

And out in Poulsbo, 39 vendors were had tents out and ready for the dozens who still were coming through the market when I arrived around noon. I hadn’t expected to see much so early, especially considering our soggy start to spring, but some spring greens and many vegetable starts and grow-your-own salad bowls were out. At least one farm offered some of the last of its potato stores.

Perennial Vintners had offerings of their newly bottled Frambelle dessert wine, made from Suyematsu Farms raspberries as well as its regular selection of wines. They also had something new to me called verjus, which is non-alcoholic and made from pressing unripe grapes. Cooks use it as a sour component in cooking, particularly when they don’t want the flavor to compete with he wine being served with the meal, as a lemon or vinegar can. Ah the things you learn by talking to people at the market!

I look forward to hearing the stories of the new farmers and vendors at local markets. I’ve also been talked into soon trying the morning offerings of Swedish pancakes, made with an authentic — and secret — family recipe.

The season, it seems, is off to a good start.

Now lets all hope for sunny days ahead and good harvests.


Still Looking Back at 2010’s Eateries: Part 3 of 4

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Last week, I started taking quick looks at the new restaurants and eateries that opened their doors to Kitsap customers in 2010. This weekend, I’ll finish those glances with a look at the rest of places (one more post after this). I’d love to hear your takes on any of the new eating establishments. Here’s the post on restaurants that start with the letters B through E, and the last one with letters G through L.

Mirracole Morsels Granola Factory - Local granola maker Nicole Matheson (whose product you may have seen at area farmers markets or at Central Market) opened a factory and cooperative bakery in the old Kingston Hotel early this year. Offerings go beyond granola with cookies and trail mixes and bread from the Borrowed Kitchen Bakery, which shares in the co-op.
Location: 25931 Washington Blvd. NE (Corner of Highway 104 and Washington)

Paella Tapas Bar - An offshoot of Burrata Bistro, this Front Street Poulsbo restaurant offers wine and tapas, the “small plates” that sustain Spain’s Madrileños until their late-night dinners. Food reviewer Bernard Jacobson gave it a 9 out of 10 for food quality and 10/10 for service.
Location: 19006 Front Street, Poulsbo

Pane D’Amore – After finding artisan bread lovers in Lynwood with it’s bread truck — which was briefly shoo-ed away by city for violating city codes against mobile businesses — Elliott Yakush, as planned, set up a retail location in a less-mobile fashion next to the Treehouse Cafe, which let him sell his breads at a table.
Location: 4569 Lynwood Center, Bainbridge Island

Papa’s Bar and Grill – Todd and Lisa Arnold opened this locally flavored spot in the Perry Avenue Mall in the spot where Ammirato’s used to be. They offer fresh soup, pizza and burgers. Some of the local flavor literally comes in the form of Minder meat used in its burgers, but in the aesthetic sense, it’s a wall of East and West High photos. Customers can add their own.
Location: 2901 Perry Ave Suite #5, Bremerton

Pho Tai – This small establishment offers both Vietnamese pho and teriyaki. But it’ll be tough to compete with Poulsbo’s other locally loved pho restaurant, Pho T&N, which is right around the corner.
Location: 19367 7th Avenue


New Kitsap Restaurants of 2010: Part 2 of 4

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

Last week, I started giving a roundup of the new eateries that opened in Kitsap in 2010 A through E. Today, we continue with G through L:

Gluten Free Bakery & Market – The market, formerly known as Gluten Free Foodies Bakery & Market, is devoted to offerings including pizza crusts, breads, hamburger buns, cookies and cakes that are wheat-free as well as free of other gluten-filled grains. The shop opened in Poulsbo Village in May. Location: 19351 8th Ave. NE, Suite 208, Poulsbo

Hales Alehouse – While the Hales beers aren’t exactly local in that it’s not brewed in Kitsap, it’s owner Mike Hale is a longtime Kitsap resident. When Hale announced that he would open a brew pub in Kitsap, some speculated (or wished) that it would go to Bremerton or South Kitsap. However, he settled on a spot at the Kitsap Mall, which opened in July. They offer, of course, Hales beers on taps as well as a rotating group of guest taps. The menu comprises salads, pizzas, burgers sandwiches and specials such as bangers and mash, meatloaf and fish and chips. Location: In the Kitsap Mall

Himalayan Chutney – This Poulsbo restaurant offers Indian and Nepaliese food, including curries, tandoori and, as the name implies, chutney. On my to-try list are the Himalayan moms, which are spiced chicken dumplings with a sesame seed sauce. Entrees are about $7-$16, and they have a lunch buffet on weekdays. Location: 18801 Front St., Poulsbo

Hitchcock – Fresh and local are the two primary words used to describe this and another restaurant that opened this spring on Bainbridge Island. Hitchcock aims for a find-dining experience. They offer $2 to $5 appetizers, such as macron almonds or a rabbit mousse with a spiced pear gelée Hot entrees range from a $16 yakitori-grilled pork belly to a $24 pork chop with brussels sprouts, bacon and applesauce. Location: 133 Winslow Way, Bainbridge Island.

Itza Pizza Time - This little building by Albertsons has been home to Skippers, Southern food, Mexican and more. First they were in the spot near Albertson’s and now they’ve moved to the old Denny’s building. This is a traditional pizza place that also serves pasta. Entrees are under $10. Location: 3621 Wheaton Way, Bremerton.

La Pan Asian Cuisine - This downtown Bremerton restaurant blends foods of the Asian persuasion, including Thai-style curries, Chinese entrees, Vietnamese pho and Filipino pancit. Average meal price is about $8. The food is well-flavored, but word to those with short lunch break: call and order ahead; they have a small kitchen back there. Location: 200 1ST Street, Bremerton, near the ferry terminal

Local Havest Restaurant – One of two restaurants that opened last year on Bainbridge to focus on locally sourced foods. The menu lists the farms from which some of the dishes come from, such as potatoes and carrots from Farmhouse Organics or chicken (stuffed with wild mushrooms and grits) from Draper Valley Farms. Prices range from $14 to $21. Location: 403 Madison Avenue, Bainbridge Island

Read Part 1 of the new Kitsap restaurants of 2010.


A Taste of Icelandic Ice Cream

Monday, December 27th, 2010

In case you missed it, Tristan Baurick offered up an article in today’s paper about Viking Feast Ice Cream, which some of you may have seen this summer at local farmers markets.

Viking Feast Ice Cream

The low-fat, but tasty treat uses an ingredient called skyr, which is similar to yogurt.

I met them at the Kitsap Oktoberfest, where they served up Hale’s beer flavored ice creams, as well as summery raspberry, key lime, blackberry and other flavors. Eggnog and gingerbread flavors were on tap this month. Viking Feast currently has no more beer offerings, though people keep asking them and they’re thinking about it, Tristan said.

If you don’t want to wait until the next beer fest or farmers market to try it, you can find out where it’s sold on Viking Feast’s Facebook page. Locations currently include the Port Gamble General Store, Real Foods on Bainbridge Island, CBC Chocolates and Crimson Cove in Poulsbo and at Aldrich’s Market in Port Townsend.

And just in case you read the story but missed the video, Tristan offered a quick look at Viking Feast’s factory, the process of making the ice cream and talked with Thormod Skald:


Fake Farmers Markets?

Friday, September 24th, 2010

The Wall Street Journal has a story today that’s sure to get local food lovers angry: Safeway and Albertsons stores in Seattle this year caught the ire of Seattle farmers when they designated outdoor fruit and veggie displays “farmers markets” (Safeway later changed the name of its to “outdoor market.”

As the WSJ points out, it brings to question how should farmers market me defined?Many believe that an essential part of the definition involves farmers selling directly to consumers, though some suggest even stricter guidelines, requiring the market to have produce as the only or majority of products available at the market. Others might also add that the produce comes only from local sources, and the definition of “local” varies from grown in the town or county it’s sold to region or state.

Most – if not all – of Kitsap’s markets have such rules. Bainbridge Island’s, for example, requires all produce to be grown on the Island or in North Kitsap. Poulsbo’s, Silverdale’s, Bremerton’s and Port Orchard’s market say vendors’ goods must be from Washington State. Poulsbo and Port Orchard make an exception for where seafood can come from, though the vendors themselves must be from Washington. All the markets post their vendor guidelines on their website.

So how do you consumers and farmers out there think the term “farmers market” should be defined?


Love Tomatoes? Poulsbo, Port Orchard, Bainbridge Markets Hosting Taste-Offs

Thursday, September 2nd, 2010

I used to hate tomatoes, the squashy, mealy things that made their way into my salads were less than appealing. But two small events forever changed my perception of these lovely vegetable-y fruits.

The first was a caprese salad I’d had a few years back. While I couldn’t seem to replicate that taste for the longest time, I’d been softened on the idea of raw tomatoes.

The second event was a taste-test politely pushed on me at the Bremerton Farmers Market. A variety of colors and sizes of tomatoes were cut and arrayed on a table. I tasted several varieties, and I was in love.

My aging refining taste buds also helped.

Fresh-grown, vine-ripened tomatoes were what I’d been missing. Now I grow a few of my own and fear not a homemade salad covered in tomatoes.

So with this love of tomatoes, I’m excited to share some upcoming tomato-related events happening in Kitsap.

Several farmers markets are hosting tomato taste-offs to allow local growers to show off their fruits. And it’s also a good chance to see just how many kinds of tomatoes are out there.

The first happens Saturday, Sept. 4 on Bainbridge Island. They’ll be judged in three categories: Cherry Tomatoes (bring 6 for judging), Salad Tomatoes (bring 3) and Slicing Tomatoes (bring 1).

There’s a prestigious panel of judges and prizes for all first place winners. Buy Local Radio will broadcast from the event.

Tomato tasted-offs in Port Orchard and Poulsbo are both on Sept. 11.

The taste-off in Poulsbo They also have three categories: Cooking/Canning Tomatoes (Roma, Black Plum, Purple Russian, Florida Pink, San Marzano, etc.); Cherry/Pear tomatoes; and Slicing/Salad Tomatoes (Black Krim, Brandywine, Mayan Gold, etc.).

For the taste-off in Port Orchard, categories are Cherry tomatoes, Roma or paste or Slicing/beefsteak.

Check the links above for entry forms, times and other rules.


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About This Blog

The Food Life covers people, place and events involved in the food community on the Kitsap Peninsula and surrounding areas.
Written by Angela Dice. You can contact me at angela [at] angeladice.com.

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