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Recipes, resources and food inspiration from people and places in Kitsap County. By Kitsap Sun Web Editor Angela Dice.
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Archive for the ‘Grilling’ Category

Grilled Nectarines with Blackberry Sauce

Friday, August 21st, 2009
Grilled nectarines

Grilled nectarines

The great thing about summertime desserts are that many tend to be simple. Grilled fruit is one of my favorites whether it be slices of grilled pineapple drizzled with coconut milk and macadamia nuts or apples or stone fruit.

Here’s a recipe I tried out a couple weeks ago:

Grilled Nectarines with Blackberry Sauce

1 cup sugar, divided
1 pound fresh blackberries
4 nectarines, cut into 1/2-inch slices
Juice from 1 lemon, divided
Vanilla ice cream

In a medium saucepan, mix blackberries, half the lemon juice and sugar over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and cook about 10 minutes, making sure all the sugar is dissolved. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve.

Lightly oil the grill and heat to high. Brush nectarine slices with olive oil, drizzle with lemon juice and sprinkle with sugar. Place on grill and cook until edges start to brown, about two or three minutes on each side.

Serve slices with a scoop of vanilla ice cream and pour sauce over it. Use leftover sauce for ice cream or waffles later.


Corn on the Cob Was Made to be Grilled

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009
Corn on the grill

Corn on the grill

It seems everyone has an opinion on what way is best to grill corn on the cob. Some boil it then grill it to get a little carmelizing charred effect. Some leave husks on. Others take it off, wrap it in foil or put it straight on the grill.

I fall firmly into the leave-husks on category, but with a little variation.

Here’s why:

It’s like nature made the vegetable to be cooked.The husks and silk not only protect those lovely little kernels from the fire, they also seal in the moisture, allowing it to steam in it’s own juices.

Husk off-ers argue that this also shields the corn from picking up any of the great smoky flavors you can get from grilling.

And here’s where the variation comes in: When I prepare the corn for grilling, I peel off all but a couple layers of husk from the corn, which allows some of the smokiness to filter in, but mostly protects the corn. I also trim the silk off the top and try to leave as much handle as I can on the end.

Once the corn is on over a medium-hot grill, I turn it every couple minutes until a charred imprint of the kernels starts to form on the husks. The husks will be burned, but the corn kernels should be safe and golden brown.

I’m not saying it’s the right way or the only way. Basting a naked cob in butter or a glaze can help keep the corn moist while it’s cooking.

One other thing to keep in mind about grilling corn is trying to get the freshest corn you can.

Since it’s grilling weather, I’ll put in a couple more grill-related posts, and I’d love to hear any of your grilling tips and recipes.

Next up for tomorrow is a recipe for a grilled fruit dessert.


Peruvian Kebabs and Roasted Yellow Pepper Sauce

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

Kebabs have to be one of my all-time favorite barbecue meals. They allow you to dress up an otherwise bland piece of meat and make something spectacular out of it. And it’s on a stick. I mean, who doesn’t like food on a stick?

Shish Kebabs, or marinated meat roasted on a stick, have been around for centuries.  The food is said to come from Turkey, according to research from foodtimeline.org and reference librarian Lynne Olver. The phrase comes originally from Turkish words meaining “skewer” and “roast meat”.

Three main types dominate: ones with a dry rub, marinated and ground meat pressed on a stick.

I’m a bigger fan of the marinated type, though I’ve had some great dry-rub types. A friend once made this delicious dry rub with cinnamon, cumin and other spices. Kabul’s on 45th Street in Seattle comes to mind when thinking of places to get great kebabs without making them yourself.

But Sunday was a stay-at-home kind of night, so I went hunting online for recipes.

My main criticism of most kebab recipes out there are the calls to alternate meat, onions and peppers or other veggies. While on the face of it, having those flavors mix in the cooking wouldn’t seem like a bad idea, but I’ve never had much success getting them all to cook at the same pace. My onions usually end up fairly raw while the meat blackens. So, I generally cook them separately.

But I came across a meat-only recipe that even tasted good reheated (recipe below).   (more…)


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About This Blog

The Food Life covers people, place and events involved in the food community on the Kitsap Peninsula and surrounding areas.
Written by Angela Dice. You can contact me at angela [at] angeladice.com.

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