Monthly Archives: September 2015

Update Your Decor with Afforable Art Paper

Cavallini Butterflies. I used this paper in Lucy's nursery.
Cavallini Butterflies. I used this paper in Lucy’s nursery.

Framing single sheets of high quality gift wrap or handmade fine paper is an easy and inexpensive way to fill a wall with art. I’ve used these types of papers in both my kids’ bedrooms to add accent colors and fun images. Paper Source is my go-to place for a great selection of both fine papers and fun gift wrap sheets. I actually worked there while we lived in Seattle, and remain a huge fan of their products to this day. They have such a variety, you could easily find one to work in every room of your house, or buy a few, trim them to various sizes and create a gallery wall.  Here is a small sampling of the vast choices,  with prices between $3.95 and $6.50 a sheet.

Rifle Paper Co. Midnight Floral
Rifle Paper Co. Midnight Floral
Rifle Paper Co. Ombre.
Rifle Paper Co. Ombre.
Paper Source Seattle Map
Paper Source Seattle Map
Cavallini Skeleton.
Cavallini Skeleton.
Blue Watercolor Stripes fine paper.
Blue Watercolor Stripes fine paper.
Gold Scallops on Sea Green fine paper.
Gold Scallops on Sea Green fine paper.

If your budget is super tight, just forgo the frame and use Scotch Removable Mounting Squares to adhere it to your wall without damaging the paper or your walls. I’ve had great success with these, they have superior wall adhesion.

The fine papers would also work nicely to cover the back of a bookcase, adding a pop of color without the permanence of paint. Check out Paper Source’s website to find just the right accent for your decor.

Cozy Up Your Den with Animal Decor

 

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Seated Squirrel Handcarved Woodlore Lamp, $448, Anthropologie.

What is cozier than the image of a woodland animal preparing their nest for the cold season? You, feathering yours! Sweet little forest animals are popping up on all kinds of decor accessories. In my book, a bit of kitsch adds a bunch of charm. Maybe you should invite one of these fur-inspired finds to spend the season in your home?

Woodblock Fox Pillow, $39, Urban Outfitters.
Woodblock Fox Pillow, $39, Urban Outfitters.

 

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Black Forest Cuckoo Clock. $124.95 on Wayfair.com.
Hand-Carved Owl Doorstop. $39 at West Elm.
Hand-Carved Owl Doorstop. $39 at West Elm.
Deer Screen Print in 6" Hoop. $20 by Lost Little Things on Etsy.
Deer Screen Print in 6″ Hoop. $20 by Lost Little Things on Etsy.
Forest Menagerie Knobs. $10 ea. Anthropologie.
Forest Menagerie Knobs. $10 ea. Anthropologie.
Deer Doormat. $22.95 on Joss and Main.
Deer Doormat. $22.95 on Joss and Main.
Natural Squirrel $7.49 at Joann.com.
Natural Squirrel $7.49 at Joann.com.

Call me crazy, but that last squirrel is so corny, he’s cute. Imagine him nestled in with your display of tiny gourds and heirloom pumpkins… Happy fall everyone!

How to Mix Fabric Patterns Like a Pro

A collection of fabric patterns that will work together to create a cohesive, but cozy dining nook.
A collection of fabric patterns that will work together to create a cohesive, but cozy dining nook.

Love that eclectic, but pulled together look of a room that has multiple fabric patterns on various surfaces? Me too. I like how multiple prints in a room lends a layered, welcoming vibe. Truly, I just love fabric, pattern and color in general, and over the years I’ve hit on how to balance it all, without making it feel like a visual assault.

I have plans to cover my dining bench in cushions and pillows to create a spot for reading, working and lingering over dinner. The color pallet is three parts indigo blue, one part poppy and one part golden pumpkin. My goal is for the nook to have a global-bohemian appeal, and to feel casual and cozy. Here are the fabrics I am choosing and how they work together.

1.Choose a print that incorporates most of the colors you intend to use in the space. This fabric or pattern will lead you through choosing all of the others. For me, this is a fabric by Robert Allen, with a medium-scale ikat pattern, that I will use for a pillow or two for the dining bench.

Robert Allen Ikat Bands Indigo. JoAnn.com $20.99/yd.

2. Play with scale. This next fabric has a very large-scale paisley pattern, which I love. It will also be on pillows for the dining bench. A pattern like this would also look amazing on drapery panels. Conversely, I plan to use a small-scale dot print for the bench cushion, which will help in hiding crumbs and the inevitable spills.

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Lacefield Designs, Sultan Batik Indigo, $38/yd.
Golding Ikat Spots Blue. Fabricsource.com $12.99/yd.
Golding Ikat Spots Blue. Fabricsource.com $12.99/yd.

3. Pull out accents from your main fabric. The first fabric has little hits of poppy red and golden apricot. I’ll use these next two fabrics to warm and brighten up the room. They will provide a happy foil to the all of the cool blues.

Tizia Ikat Poppy
Tizia Ikat Poppy, Fabric.com $21.98/yd.

4. Provide a place for your eye to rest. Bring in a solid with texture, to balance all of the pattern. I like this linen blend for its softness and warm hue. I’ll use it on a lumbar pillow for the bench.

Waverly Orissa Blend, Pumpkin. Fabric.com $18.98 yd.
Waverly Orissa Blend, Pumpkin. Fabric.com $18.98 yd.

Mixing patterns is all about balancing scale and color. Repetition of the same hue in several fabrics weaves a common thread, while introducing pops of complementary colors provides warmth. Using patterns of varying scale, but with a similar theme (ikat), creates visual variation, but not discord. I hope that you’re now inspired, not intimidated, to combine different fabrics to add charm and cheer to your home.

 

 

Just Go: Valley Vintage Market, Sept. 18-19

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Image from Valley Vintage.

Valley Vintage Market is an exciting monthly flea market held at the Central Valley Road Grange Hall. This month’s event is Friday the 18th from 3-7pm and Saturday the 19th from 9am-4pm. You’ll find all sorts of vintage treasures and re-purposed furniture, as well as work by local artists. Check out their facebook page for additional sneak-peek photos. The market’s address is 10140 Central Valley Road, Poulsbo.

This month, I’m excited to discover the illustrations and chalk-work of Poulsbo artist Brynn James, who recently won the nation-wide mug design contest for Starbucks. Her chalk-painted silver trays would be a sweet accent in just about any room of the house.

Image from Valley Vintage, work by Brynn James.
Image from Valley Vintage, work by Brynn James.

Succulents: An Extension of Summer

 

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It’s so hard to let summer go. In an attempt to extend the season, I’m bringing a bit of the outdoors in. Succulents are beautiful, and they can thrive indoors, given the right conditions. They also add a natural, textural design element to any room. I gathered some small containers at home and purchased several little succulents at one of my favorite garden shops, Bremerton City Nursery.

Your succulents need to have good drainage and a spot near a window, so they get about 6 hours of sunlight a day. I placed a layer of small stones at the bottom of each container, removed the plant from its pot, loosening the soil and exposing some of the roots. Then I tucked them into their new homes. I watered them just enough to soak the soil. Do not over-water your succulents! When they are inside during fall and winter, they require even less water than when outdoors. Wait until the soil is completely dry before watering them again.

I chose to group my succulents together on a tray for maximum impact, but they would also look nice sprinkled throughout a bookcase display, on a kitchen window sill, on the bathroom vanity or even as a centerpiece at your next dinner party.

 

Furniture Painting Classes and Vintage Finds at Red Plantation Marketplace

I recently had the pleasure of walking along Poulsbo’s Front Street for the first time in far too long. I was so happy to find some new shops, brimming with great vintage decor finds. Among my favorites is Red Plantation Marketplace. Owner Gabrielle Elliott has curated a great mix of vendors offering all sorts of vintage furniture, from pieces with an industrial edge to rustic chic, and lots in between.

Gabrielle also stocks Amy Howard products — a collection of chalk  and milk paints, as well as waxes and finishes — and teaches classes on how to use the products. In the next session, held at 1 p.m. on Thursday, September 24, she’ll walk you through steps to get an aged look when painting furniture. I’d like to attend one of the classes myself, as the chalk painted furniture trend is far from over.

Even if taking the class isn’t for you, this shop is well worth a visit to get inspired from the creative displays and grab a few vintage accessories to personalize your home.

Pantry Organizing Tips

Sue wrote to me with a request for pantry organization solutions. Hers is under the stairs, so it is quite oddly shaped.  While it seems she is all set with efficient pantry-depth shelving, she still has struggles. She sent some photos:

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In studying the photos she sent in, I came up with five good tips that just might help her keep what she needs within easy reach.

  1. Think of  your pantry in terms of zones: Baking, Canned Goods, Boxed Foods, Tupperware, Glassware, Small Appliances, Party Supplies, etc. Put items from the most used zones in the front. This helps tremendously when it’s time to prep a meal and when groceries come home.
  2. An over-the-door clear plastic shoe organizer can hold your seasoning packets, soup mixes, back stocks of spices, even canned items or animal treats.
  3. Magazine holders are just the right size to hold aluminum foil, Saran wrap, and wax paper upright and make it easy to grab.
  4. Use milk crates, or plain cardboard boxes to corral larger items like appliances or bulk bottled water on the floor of the pantry.
  5. Small- and medium-sized, clear or perforated bins work perfectly for grouping like items. Use one for all of your pasta, one for your grains, one for bags of rice, one for beans. You can use them for canned goods too. Label them clearly. It’s much easier to pull out a whole bin, than to push items aside, to find something at the back.

Here are some suggestions to help with the process. All of the following products can be found at Target stores or at Target.com.

Honey-Can-Do over the door shoe organizer. $12.19
Honey-Can-Do over the door shoe organizer. $12.19.
Threshold Gold Rustic Wire Magazine Holder. $8.99.
Threshold Gold Rustic Wire Magazine Holder. $8.99.
Room Essentials Milk Crate White. $3.99.
Room Essentials Milk Crate White. $3.99.
Room Essentials Branch Weave Storage Bins, set of 4. $39.99.
Room Essentials Branch Weave Storage Bins, set of 4. $39.99.

Sue- I hope this inspires you to make some changes!

Please feel free to email your design, decorating and organizing dilemmas to me at paisleypine@gmail.com!

 

DIY: Easy Lamp Makeover

Have a lamp that needs a refresh? So did I. A while back, I bought a pair of ceramic ginger jar lamp bases at the magnificent, annual Bainbridge Island Rotary Auction.  I knew they had potential, and at $2.50 each, it was hardly a gamble. The pale yellow finish was cracked and drab, so I covered them  with Krylon’s high gloss white spray paint. While they didn’t turn out quite as  glossy as I thought they would, it was still a vast improvement over their previous color.

Next, I bought two basic white drum shades at Target and covered them with burlap. On the inside of the shades, I used burlap ribbon from Paper Source, to cover the uneven glued edges. Covering a lampshade with fabric is an inexpensive and simple way to add another layer of texture or pattern to a room, and I’m a big fan.

How much material you’ll need for the project depends on the size of your shade, but take into consideration whether the shade is straight or angled. Angled shades will use more fabric. Here is a basic step by step.

  1. Lay your shade down on top of the fabric piece, lining up the seam on the shade with the edge of the fabric. Then move it in about two or so inches, giving yourself an extra two inches or so, to fold under and make a nice seam at the end.
  2. Use a pencil or fabric marker to trace the bottom edge of the shade as you roll it across the fabric, so that you’ve made a complete turn from the start of the shade, all the way to the other side of it.  Line the shade back up at the start and repeat the tracing with the top edge of the shade.
  3. Make a line connecting the top and bottom lines. Now, add about two inches of height to each the top and bottom lines. This is your pattern. Cut on the outside lines.
  4. To adhere the fabric to the shade you can use fabric glue or hot glue.  Starting at the vertical seam on the shade, glue down the first edge of the fabric. Wrap the fabric around the shade, pulling it taught as you go. Fold under the last couple of inches, to create a clean looking seam and glue.  The trick here is to keep that fabric tight while wrapping and gluing, so the completed product doesn’t look baggy.
  5. Fold the top edges of fabric toward the inside of the shade, and glue as you go. Repeat with the bottom edge.  You can either try to make the folds look nice or use a complementary ribbon, like I did, to cover any jagged edges.

If  you want to further embellish the shade, you can glue a decorative trim or ribbon on the outside bottom and top edges. Here is a before and after of my project!