Tag Archives: Olympic College

NAACP Health Fair TOMORROW Olympic College

What do the NAACP Community Health Fair, Harrison Medical Center, and Olympic Community College have in common?

 

Easy – they all have an interest in health care and patient education.

When:            Saturday, December 15, 2012

Where:           Olympic Community College – at the Student Center next to the Book Store

Time:              11:00 AM to 4:00 PM

For info:         360. 434.1754 or email: hjs52@hotmail.co

Community Resource Informational Booths

 Project HELP

 Entertainment

Fashion Show

Testimonials

Food

There will be free Snacks, Youth Fashion Show, Free Massages, Informational Health Material, Information on Affordable Health Insurance, Blood Pressure Readings and lots more!


Robin from Harrison Respiratory was kind enough to bring me a wonderful array of helpful information to hand out at the fair.  I have them packed to take tomorrow.  Thank you Harrison Medical Center!

Ask me about COPD – anything.  I will be the short, really round woman huffing and puffing behind a walker and pushing a case on wheels chock full of free helpful information for you. 

Thanks for reading. 

Hope to see you tomorrow …. Sharon O’Hara

When the Power Goes Out – Is Kitsap County a Cold and Lonely Place For COPDers?

When the Power Goes Out – Is Kitsap County a Cold and Lonely Place For COPDers?

We had one battery charged lantern and I kept the box handy on the counter because I knew the lights would come on any minute and I could quickly put it away again. Two days later, the lights came on and I put it away.  The laptop puddled in place – a good reminder that better power days were ahead…same with the lamp.  The two drawers full of old candles were not lit…I do not want to inhale candle fumes.

The little shortwave radio was meant as a Christmas present but I’ve kept it – the so welcome sound and information was my connection to the world.

I didn’t know it when I shot this photo but less than two hours later, the tireless power wonders will have restored our power.  It was so very cold….and it felt balmy when the temperature inside finally came up to 50 degrees.

No, only for those on life giving machines such as the C-Pap and Bi-Pap machines – they have nowhere to go to plug in their life sustaining machines.   Seniors on a concentrator bleed-in usually can’t carry the heavy machines.

The plus during the last two day power outage was to discover all the people helping others in a tight fix.

My husband, the Old Guy, spent most of the two days out in the cold trying to fix the generator.

The discovery that the tube he thought would fix it, didn’t,  led to more cell calls to the generator tech folks and ultimately to another  Kitsap County Angel –Ward’s Radiator Shop in Chico.

It turned out that all we needed was an expandable plug that Wards said should work temporarily until he can solder it in this summer.  It worked and is still working!  But not until after the wonderful power workers fixed our power and we went on the emergency source heat pump. Thank you, Ward’s Radiator Shop in Chico!

Our inside temperature dropped to 40 degrees and by the second night the Old Guy fixed our old portable Honda generator and asked if I wanted it hooked to a portable heater or use it on my bi-pap and concentrator.

Well.  Having taken the Mountaineering course at Olympic College some 35 years ago and learning some survival skills,  I didn’t see the sense of blowing 41 degree air into the 98 degree body I’d carefully kept warm by layering.  And, once in bed, I stayed warm and didn’t need a heater.

Question:  Was my concern and decision against blowing 41 degree cold air into my airway wrong?

Would the cold air have been warmed enough by a warm core or would my core have begun to cool to reflect the cold air blowing in?

As it was, many of us went without the machines that keep our airway open and (for some) that keep our vital blood/oxygen numbers up.

Funny thing: With good reason, the Old Guy complains, moans, and groans whenever I ask him to get something out of the freezer and puts on heavy gloves to do it – he has Raynaud’s Disease in his fingers.

During the two day power outage, he spent hours in the below freezing weather working on the generator and never said a word…just went to work trying to fix it…and couldn’t wear the thick, warm gloves.  ‘Caregivers’ is an overdue story for another time.

Bainbridge Seniors at the Senior Center have plans to provide a place to go and I hope they coordinate with oxygen companies to assist those on machines to keep their airways open and for those on concentrators and oxygen.

http://pugetsoundblogs.com/copd-and-other-stuff/2011/01/09/cold-in-silverdale-bi-senior-center-rocks/

My bi-pap was ordered after a Sleep Apnea study in 2001and Lincare supplied my Respironics Duet on 3 August 2001, according to Mike DiMatteo of Lincare, and our insurance paid it off in February 2002.

In 2010, my secure sense of well-being went to the bottom of rattlesnake canyon in a hand basket when a home study showed my sats dropped into the basement while asleep, way below good oxygen levels.  I fell through the cracks in our system and I can’t be the only one.

We have stuff – serious stuff that needs fixing and that is another story for another time.

As I see it, oxygen companies are caught in the bind of Medicare, Medicaid and patients and one flaw has been lack of communication between patient, physician and Oxygen Company.

Patients talk to your doctor – its vital your sats stay up while awake and how much leeway do we have if they drop when we’re asleep?  We need oxygen to our organs and the brain is a vital organ.

While I had the friendly and helpful Mike DiMatteo on the phone, I asked him about offering help with the Bainbridge Senior Center seniors planning a safe haven when the power goes out.  Mike said he would be glad to offer whatever help/advice they needed.  I’m sure most of Kitsap’s oxygen companies who supply these machines will help too.

Someday the rest of Kitsap County will follow the Bainbridge Senior Center seniors lead and provide assistance for those who need help when the power goes out. For some seniors, just a viable power plug can make the difference between life and death.

A super plus is the great event next Wednesday at Harrison Silverdale speaking to this very subject of emergency assistance for those of us on oxygen, concentrators, BiPap and C-Pap – all respiratory folks.

COPDers and caregivers – Mark Wednesday, 19 January on your calendar – Full details tomorrow.

More later… Sharon O’Hara

Olympic College Nursing Program Treats 2010 – Meet Charlene and Amber

I can’t let 2010 slip away without showing a few photos about one of my 2010 highlights – the joined Harrison Medical Center and Olympic College RN Nursing program.

I had the privilege of being a senior /patient type for two charming OC nursing students who paid weekly, two hour visits to my home during the fall quarter.

The nursing/patient/senior program is super and I was lucky they had room to fit me into the program.  I knew it would be a fun experience and I agreed when my oldest granddaughter said no shot was involved.  All that was needed is a real person and/or family.

I will do almost anything to help medical students progress, thought it would be interesting, and knew it would be fun.

What I didn’t expect was the growing attachment I felt toward these girls and know that great things are ahead for them and their patients.  May love and best wishes follow them always as they touch other lives as they have mine.

The Harrison Medical Center and Olympic College Nursing partnership is an awesome success if the two nursing students I met weekly for fall quarter 2010 is an example.

Charlene Engelland and Amber are opposites in personalities but joined in their intense dedication to learning medicine and patients.

Both are personable, funny, and professional in manner and appearance.  I looked forward to every visit and enjoyed learning along with them and from them.

They took turns checking, among other things, temperature, pulse, blood pressure and I learned there is a pulse on the upper foot between the big and adjoining toe.  All these years have gone by and I never knew there was a pulse there.

Charlene, left and Amber, right…

My photo editing skills aren’t there…sorry…

Charlene’s shoes were made for dancing…. too bad I’ve misplaced the edited version of this photo (uncluttered it)

Charlene’s live patient test for one of Harrison Medical Center’s finest RN/instructor, Mary.  Mary works in my favorite area, the “M” department..

Thank you,  Ladies, for a wonderful experience!… Sharon

Btw:  Another highlight of 2010 is the miracle birth and life of our latest great-grandson.  I call him the Lucky Little Prince because in the old days he would have died.  He was born with medical issues – his heart.  He not only survived, he is thriving after complicated heart surgeries after his birth.

The Lucky Little Prince’s mom works at Harrison Medical Center full time, taking classes to be an RN.  Proud daddy, our youngest grandson, works around high rises.

Happy New Year Everyone!

More later… Sharon O’Hara