COPD and Other Stuff

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Posts Tagged ‘Harrison Medical Center’

Lymphedema = Pain = More Pain = Avoidance = Get Educated = Get Fit

Tuesday, March 12th, 2013

 

Lymphedema = Pain = More Pain = Avoidance = Get Educated = Get Fit  

National Lymphedema Network – Educating Patients Online 

Part 3b of 3b 

Exercise and Compression Garments:

Lymphedema Remedial Exercise as a part of CDT requires compression garments or bandages.3-5 There are no studies on the use of compression garments when performing stretching or flexibility exercise alone.

Our visiting young cousin from Norway rode her first recumbent trike in Silverdale and wore "What is COPD" tee shirt while she was here.

Our visiting young cousin from Norway rode her first recumbent trike in Silverdale and wore “What is COPD” tee shirt while she was here.

My young cousin, Malin from Norway is included here because COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) began in 1997 for me and led into my long ride into medical conditions – one after the other and my gathering weight attracted lymphedema as surely as fresh bread and butter sticks to peanut butter and strawberry jam. 

“The NLN Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) recommends using the guidelines for aerobic and resistance exercise to guide use of compression during flexibility exercise since flexibility exercises may be combined with other forms of exercise. 

The amount and type of compression for exercise should be decided with input from a professional knowledgeable about lymphedema. There is no strong evidence basis for the use of compression garments during exercise; however, most experts in the field of lymphedema advise the use of compression during vigorous exercise for people with a confirmed diagnosis of lymphedema.

Melissa showing me the latest fast, protective lower leg support

Melissa showing me the latest fast, protective lower leg support

Melissa Mercogliano, Center for Orthopedic & Lymphatic Physical Therapy in Port Orchard, WA. recently showed me a new and easy way to add support stockings…easy except for we Tub’ettes.

“One study suggested that individuals with lymphedema who do resistance exercise without compression may increase swelling. 

20 Resistance exercise may reduce limb volume when used as an adjunct to compression therapy in people with confirmed lymphedema.

8 One study showed that aerobic and weight-lifting exercise was safely performed without compression in women at risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema.

9 That study showed patients who developed lymphedema could continue to exercise with compression garments. Compression garments should be measured by an individual trained and experienced in fitting compression garments for lymphedema and should be at least Class I compression for upper extremity. Higher classes may be required for more severe lymphedema and for lower extremity lymphedema.

 1-IMG_29033-IMG_29074-IMG_2909

Custom sized, each leg. This pair is old...notice the crinkles below the rubber dotted band. The replacement compression stockings are black.This pair is about one year old.

Custom sized, each leg. This pair is old…notice the crinkles below the rubber dotted band. The replacement compression stockings are black.
This pair is about one year old.

I throw the stockings in a little zippered mesh cloth bag and into the washer on a short cycle, regular soap, extra rinse – cold water and smooth out and let them hang to dry.

I prefer the toe less stocking so my toes don’t get scrunched up and have two different kinds. The little rubbery tips around the tops of both help them from sliding on down my leg and cutting off circulation.  Ask your doctor. 

“A hand piece (gauntlet or glove) is recommended when exercising with a sleeve to avoid causing or exacerbating hand swelling. 

Definition of Individuals At Risk for Lymphedema:

Individuals at risk for lymphedema have not displayed signs and symptoms of lymphedema but may have sustained damage to their lymphatic systems through surgical lymph node removal or radiation therapy.

Additionally, individuals at risk may have surgical incisions in the vicinity of lymph transport vessels.

Individuals who have family members with hereditary lymphedema may also be at risk.

An individual’s risk of lymphedema may change over time depending on factors such as weight gain, age, and changes in medical condition. 

It is the position of the NLN that:

Exercise is a part of a healthy lifestyle and is essential for effective lymphedema management

Before starting any exercise program, individuals should be cleared for the program of activity by their physician.

Lymphedema Exercises (also known as Remedial Exercises) are specific rhythmic muscle and breathing exercises used as a part of lymphedema treatment in Phase I and Phase II

Complete Decongestive Therapy (see the NLN Position Paper on Diagnosis and Treatment). http://www.lymphnet.org/pdfDocs/nlntreatment.pdf 

In Phase II lymphedema maintenance, these exercises can be combined with or integrated into a regular exercise program.

After intensive treatment with CDT, the person with lymphedema should work with the certified lymphedema therapist or qualified lymphedema specialist provider (MD, NP) to adapt their remedial exercises into their fitness and weight management program at the time they are moving from Phase I (treatment phase) to Phase II (self-management).

Individuals with or at risk for lymphedema can and should perform aerobic and resistance exercise in a safe manner.

The individual with or at risk for lymphedema may benefit from working with an Exercise Physiologist and/or Personal Trainer. The person with lymphedema should inquire if the trainer or exercise physiologist has experience working with lymphedema and other medical conditions. Certification for personal trainers varies. Patients who are unsure of about the qualifications of a community exercise practitioner should work with a certified lymphedema therapist or health care provider to assist them in finding a community exercise program or professional.

In general, individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of lymphedema should utilize compression garments or compression bandages during exercise.

Individuals at risk for lymphedema may or may not utilize compression garments during exercise; this is an individual decision to be made with guidance from a care provider and/or therapist based on risk, activity, and conditioning level.

Individuals at risk for lymphedema will benefit from most forms of exercise tailored to their individual needs.

Individuals at risk for or with a confirmed diagnosis of lymphedema should avoid repetitive overuse of the affected part. Sudden increase in an individual’s usual exercise duration or intensity may trigger or worsen lymphedema. It is likely that a program of slowly progressive exercise for the affected body part will decrease the potential for common daily activities to result in overuse.

Exercise should be started gradually, increased cautiously, and stopped for pain, increased swelling, or discomfort.

The risks of exercise for the individual with or at risk for lymphedema must be balanced against the risks of deconditioning that undoubtedly results from not exercising. A deconditioned body part with or at risk for lymphedema can do progressively less without risk of overuse. As a result, exercise is recommended for those with and at risk for lymphedema.

The NLN cannot specifically determine the safety of exercise for any individual. The guidelines in this Position Paper provide general principles, but do not substitute for medical evaluation and recommendations from a health care professional. It is the responsibility of all individuals with or at risk for lymphedema to consult with their health care provider regarding their own specific needs. 

References:

1. Tidhar D, Katz-Leurer M. Aqua lymphatic therapy in women who suffer from breast cancer treatment related lymphedema: a randomized controlled study. Support Care Cancer. 2010;18(3):383-392.

 2.Moseley AL, Piller NB, Carati CJ. The effect of gentle arm exercise and deep breathing on secondary arm lymphedema.Lymphol. 2005;38(3):136-145.

3.Boris M, Weindorf S, Lasinski B, Boris G. Lymphedema reduction by noninvasive complex lymphedema therapy. Oncol (Williston Park). 1994;8(9):95-106; discussion 109-110.

4.Földi E, Földi M, Weissleder H. Conservative treatment of lymphoedema of the limbs. Angiol. 1985;36(3):171-180.

5.Földi M, Földi E, eds-in-chief. Foldi’s Textbook of Lymphology for Physicians and Lymphedema Therapists, 2nd ed. Munchen, Germany:Urban & Fischer; 2006.

6.Bergmann A, Mendes VV, de Almeida Dias R, do Amaral E Silva B, da Costa Leite Ferreira MG, Fabro EA. 

Incidence and risk factors for axillary web syndrome after breast cancer surgery [published online ahead of print October 17, 2011].

Breast Cancer Res Treat. doi:10.1007/s10549-011-1805-7.

7.Fourie W, Rob KA. Physiotherapy management of axillary web syndrome following breast cancer treatment: discussing the use of soft tissue techniques. 

Physiotherapy. 2009;95(4):314-320. 

 

NLN • 116 New Montgomery Street, Suite 235 • San Francisco, CA 94105

Tel: 415-908-3681 • Fax: 415-908-3813

Infoline: 1-800-541-3259 • Email: nln@lymphnet.org •

Online: www.lymphnet.org 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Several years ago, I called Harrison Medical Center and asked if non-cancer patients with lymphedema could attend their support group meetings.  At that time, it was limited to cancer patients.

Yesterday I called the following number to be certain it was still up to date.  It is and the closest Lymphedema Support Group I know about.

If anyone knows of more, let me know – I can post it here.

 

Kitsap County Closest Support Group 

Northwest Lymphedema Center

Kent, WA (24.11 miles * Meeting times: Date varies  Phone: (206) 575-7775 

 

Tub’etts! 

I’d like to be part of a support group of fatties who NEED to lose weight for their health’s sake – with or without current medical issues. No dues – a scale and occasionally health professionals willing to talk to us – to educate us – to motivate us – guest speakers. 

I have been told that I’m not a good candidate for bariatric surgery…so, before I push that particular button – is there anyone beside me, who wants to be part of an obese/tubby support group to work together for weight loss and good health? 

To lose weight through good nutrition and exercise is my goal. 

We are dying of too much fat, fellow Tubby Ones.

Will you join me in our battle to shed the fat and live healthy?  Let me know…

 

Thanks for reading… Sharon O’Hara familien1@comcast.net

Kitsap County Library System has educational Lymphedema books for the layperson – just ask.


National Lymphedema Network urges the American College of Surgeons to …

Sunday, March 3rd, 2013

Greetings… Following is a copy of an email plea from the National Lymphedema Network to the Journal Of American College of Surgeons.

I’ve produced it here almost verbatim because I have leg lymphedema and it is one of the most painful difficult to live with diseases I have.  Last year it flared again and oozed, taking  about 10 months to heal, including a month in Harrison, a month at Martha and Mary Rehab Center, and months of my husband daily cleaning and re-wrapping my lower legs and feet.

Breast cancer survivors need to be educated to the risks of getting lymphedema.  I can promise – as a patient with lower leg lymphedema – nobody should get this disease if it can be avoided.

Patients, please talk to your doctor about lymphedema.  If she/he will not discuss it, find a doctor who will.

 

“National Lymphedema Network

In response to an article published in the March issue of the Journal Of American College of Surgeons (http://www.journalacs.org/article/S1072-7515(12)01312-9/abstract) the NLN Medical Advisory Committee is responding to a Press Release released on February 25, 2013 (http://www.facs.org/news/jacs/lymphedema0313.html)  in the Journal of American College of Surgeons, “Breast Cancer Patients Fear for Developing Lymphedema Far Exceeds the Risk

Respectfully:

Saskia R.J. Thiadens RN

Executive Director

 

“March 1, 2013

On 2/25/2013 the Journal of American College of Surgeons released a statement entitled, “Breast Cancer Patients’ Fear of Developing Lymphedema Far Exceeds the Risk.” The press release was in response to findings from a single-site study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons noting that some breast cancer survivors take extraordinary measures to try to prevent lymphedema that may not be necessary. The rate of development of lymphedema in the limbs of the study patients (N=120, followed to 12 months) was similar to reported incidence in the medical literature. Three percent of patients having a sentinel lymph node biopsy developed lymphedema and 19% of patients having an axillary lymph node dissection developed lymphedema. The study indicated that patients with sentinel lymph node biopsy worried and took precautions as much as those who had axillary node dissections.

The National Lymphedema Network agrees with the statement in the press release that “future research should be aimed at better predicting which women will develop lymphedema, thus allowing for targeted prevention and intervention strategies and individualized plans for risk-reducing behaviors for each woman during and after her breast cancer treatment.” However, since this type of risk stratification and broad education does not currently exist, it is important for patients to be given accurate information by their doctors and oncology care providers on reasonable approaches to reducing the risk of developing lymphedema.

The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2013 there will be about 232, 340 new cases of breast cancer in the US and there are approximately 2.9 million breast cancer survivors in the US. If 20% of those who have axillary dissections, and, conservatively, 3% with sentinel lymph node biopsies, are at risk of developing lymphedema, this is still a very large number of women who have reason to be concerned about their risk of developing lymphedema.

Lymphedema is a progressive, debilitating condition that is not merely swelling, but an immune system dysfunction. When recognized late in its course, or inadequately treated, lymphedema leads to chronic infection and progressive disability. Women who are at risk for lymphedema have reason to be concerned and these concerns should not be minimized.

The National Lymphedema Network advocates a reasonable approach to risk reduction guidelines, given that a large population of women is still at significant risk of developing lymphedema. In the NLN Position Paper on Risk Reduction, revised in 2012 and available at www.lymphnet.org , a risk stratification approach is detailed so patients can take appropriate precautions according to their medical situation. Every breast cancer survivor deserves accurate information about her or his risk of developing lymphedema and reasonable precautions based on the available scientific evidence.

The American College of Surgeons, and all providers of care to breast cancer patients, are encouraged to provide every breast cancer patient with accurate information about lymphedema, so patients can make informed choices. Given the imperfect state of the science on risk reduction for lymphedema, there are many reasonable, healthy suggestions for patients at risk of lymphedema to reduce their risk, such as weight management and exercise. The Position Papers on the NLN website on Exercise, Risk Reduction and Screening for Breast Cancer Related Lymphedema were written by a panel of medical experts in the field of lymphology and lymphedema treatment.

The National Lymphedema Network urges the American College of Surgeons to endorse the NLN Position papers, provide them to their members, and acknowledge that a large number of breast cancer survivors are at risk of or currently have lymphedema. These patients need education and information that will allow them to take precautions that are reasonable and not excessive.  Education is the key and then what each one does with that information is a personal choice and a part of personalized health care.”

…NLN Medical Advisory Committee  *  Hotline: 1.800.541.3259

National Lymphedema Network | 116 New Montgomery St. | Suite 235 | San Francisco | CA | 94105

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Best wishes and thanks for reading …   Sharon O’Hara <familien1@comcast.net>


Happy Martin Luther King Day 2013! NAACP’s Health Fair in photos – a little late

Monday, January 21st, 2013

Happy Martin Luther King Day!

The recent NAACP Health Fair at Olympic College was fun, a day full of record rainfall, a little snow, great speakers and booths crammed with information.

The program included a delightful parade of kids –  tots to teens modeling the latest fashions and we were later served a delicious box lunch.

Thanks to the NAACP Health Fair, I had the opportunity to show and tell about COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) and what it can lead to…not good stuff.  It was my pleasure, thanks for asking.

Harrison Medical Center was not able to attend to offer early detection COPD Spirometry testing – this time.

A quick glance around when I arrived showed a who’s who of Kitsap County, including Bremerton’s Mayor, Patty Lent.

18-IMG_3018 17-IMG_3016 16-IMG_3013 15-IMG_3010 14-IMG_3007 13-IMG_3005 12-IMG_3004 11-IMG_3000 10-IMG_2998 09-IMG_2990 08-IMG_2989 07-IMG_2986 06-IMG_2983 05-IMG_2979 04-IMG_2976 28-IMG_2969 27-IMG_2967 26-IMG_3029 25-IMG_3026 24-IMG_3024 23-IMG_3023 22-IMG_3022 21-IMG_3021 20-IMG_3020 19-IMG_3019 03-IMG_2994  Hey, mom – I found you! 01-IMG_2997

Let’s go THIS way – there is my mom!

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

Thanks for reading… Sharon O’Hara (familien1@comcast.net)

Martin Luther King, Jr. DayWikipedia: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is a United States federal holiday marking the birthday of Rev.


NAACP Health Fair TOMORROW Olympic College

Friday, December 14th, 2012

What do the NAACP Community Health Fair, Harrison Medical Center, and Olympic Community College have in common?

 

Easy – they all have an interest in health care and patient education.

When:            Saturday, December 15, 2012

Where:           Olympic Community College – at the Student Center next to the Book Store

Time:              11:00 AM to 4:00 PM

For info:         360. 434.1754 or email: hjs52@hotmail.co

Community Resource Informational Booths

 Project HELP

 Entertainment

Fashion Show

Testimonials

Food

There will be free Snacks, Youth Fashion Show, Free Massages, Informational Health Material, Information on Affordable Health Insurance, Blood Pressure Readings and lots more!


Robin from Harrison Respiratory was kind enough to bring me a wonderful array of helpful information to hand out at the fair.  I have them packed to take tomorrow.  Thank you Harrison Medical Center!

Ask me about COPD – anything.  I will be the short, really round woman huffing and puffing behind a walker and pushing a case on wheels chock full of free helpful information for you. 

Thanks for reading. 

Hope to see you tomorrow …. Sharon O’Hara


Olympic College Nursing Class of 2012 Pinning Ceremony

Sunday, June 10th, 2012

Olympic College pinned their 2012 Nursing School graduates Saturday, 9 June 2012 at Bremerton High School auditorium.  Enthusiastic family and friends filled the school and I was surprised to see the number of nursing volunteer mentors of our Kitsap County new nursing graduates as they were called to stand up in recognition of their two-year scholastic efforts.

From personal experience, I know the caring, giving nature of the nursing staff at Harrison Medical Center but had not realized so many Kitsap County nurses gave heartwarming volunteer involvement with the nursing students at OC.

The class of 2012.  Pinning, Chris Stokke, RN, MN

Proud brother, Uriah Hawkins and his son, Gabriel watches the ceremony. Wife Christine and mother of Gabe could not attend – she was working with patients at Harrison Medical Center.

Josh Peglow and son, Malachi.  Health care runs in this family.  Josh works with patients at Martha and Mary Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in Poulsbo as did his wife, Shantie before she entered the nursing program at Olympic College.

Gabriel and Aunt Shantie

Laughing new graduate and her new nursing pin

Shantie and Josh Peglow and children, Cheyenne and Malachi join good friends, Deborah and Wayne with children Chris, Nick, Rebecka and Caroline

Glen and Kim Peglow and Shanties Aunt Julia Booth

The Nightingale Pledge

“I solemnly pledge myself before God and in the presence of this assembly to pass my life in purity and to practice my profession faithfully.

I will abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous, and will not take or knowingly administer any harmful drug.  I will do all in my power to maintain and elevate the standard of my profession, and will hold in confidence all personal matters committed to my keeping and all family affairs coming to my knowledge in the practice of my calling. With loyalty will I endeavor to aid the physician in their work, and devote myself to the welfare of those committed to my care.”

Congratulations Graduates!

Thanks for reading … Sharon O’Hara


Dr. Halligan, Harrison Medical Center, Lymphedema Update – Part 3 of 3

Saturday, June 2nd, 2012

Thanks to four weeks at Harrison Medical Center Bremerton, Dr. Halligan, Doctor’s Clinic Silverdale and Martha & Mary Rehab Center in Poulsbo and my husband, Chuck, the latest annoying, painful Lymphedema outbreak is almost healed.

I hope with continued use of support stockings, I will never again see the open, painful weeping sores running down my lower legs.

Ignoring edema can lead to nasty painful Lymphedema outbreaks – not a place to go, folks – listen to your doctor.

The last two Lymphedema lesions might have healed months ago had not RLS or whatever the problem is, not raised havoc then and now forcing me to stand and move – the direct opposite of what I needed to do.

Following is Lymphedema By the Month Photos – from September 2011  to date.

And to think – it all started with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease after a forty year smoking history.

Thanks for reading…Sharon O’Hara


Dr. Halligan and Harrison Medical Center Angels, Part 2 of 3

Sunday, March 4th, 2012

Our recent tragic killings and deaths make me doubly grateful for the incredible people and treatment I received from our hometown hospital and staff at Harrison Medical Center.

Those of us who have been patients there over a length of time know Harrison’s greatest assets are in their staff.  Their nurses and aides, many named Elizabeth and one each named Joseph and DanielJoseph is notable for nursing skills and his uncanny ability to find anything….even a bridge….as in my missing two-tooth bridge.  He found it in a little container with “?” on the lid.

Nurse Elizabeth on 3N is only one example of innovative, creative thinking.    

 

Look at the contraption she put together to take the pressure off the bottom of my left calf to lessen the pain of the open weepy lesions and help it heal faster. The devise worked so well that when I was shifted down a floor they wheeled me downstairs right on the bed.

Nurse Sylvia on 3N brought me the Kitsap Sun newspaper every morning she worked.  I always knew she was on shift when I awoke and spotted the Sun on my bedside tray.  When I was moved to the private room on two – her spirit lifting thoughtful placing of the Kitsap Sun on the bedside table continued and never failed to make me grin in thanks.

A complication was the UW positive testing for MRSA.  You do not want it – hospital visitors do not want you to have MRSA either.  Gowning up and wearing rubber gloves to visit a friend in the hospital might well cut down on regular hospital visits.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0004520/, http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mrsa/DS00735  

Dr. Halligan, Doctor’s Clinic in Silverdale, treated my leg daily in the hospital…he never failed to continue his daily treatment and re-wrapping of my lower left leg. 

(I am hoping to go home tomorrow from rehab at Martha & Mary’s Rehab Center in Poulsbo.  I have not been home in 8 weeks).

More later.

Thanks for reading…. Sharon O’Hara


Dr. Halligan and Harrison Medical Center Angels, Part 1 of 3

Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

I am writing this from a hospital bed on the cancer floor at Harrison Medical Center in hope someone will take note what edema can and may do to those who ignore it.

Also, I’m writing in heartfelt thanks to Dr. Halligan, Internist/Surgeon at Silverdale Doctor’s Clinic who saved my life and leg recently by taking over failed treatment for my Lymphedema/Cellulitis/Edema filled legs and painstakingly, day after day treated and changed leg wraps.

Dr. Halligan patiently explained my left leg needed debriding to remove the dead skin, much as burn victims and he couldn’t tell what was under the surface dead skin or how deep the dead tissue went. This four-month pain riddled sleep deprived patient gratefully lay in a bed at Harrison Bremerton 23 hours a day, 7 days a week. Four weeks total this Thursday.

Tomorrow, Wednesday, I am moving to a rehab place for rehabilitation and further healing.

I battled without success since early September the Cellulitis/Edema in my left leg until my right leg reddened with infection and edema and began the water blisters that experience taught would lead to lymph fluid running down my lower legs, scalding the skin it touched and spreading the poison…

Chris Goss, MD, my lung doc at the University of Washington Medical Center straightened out the Restless Leg Syndrome medication problem so I could sleep if the pain eased.

Edema patients  – PLEASE – check out the following photos of the latest rise and fall of my edema filled legs and ask yourself if ignoring edema is worth it.

Dr. Halligan – thank you!

More next time on Harrison Medical Center’s Angels in disguise.

….thanks for reading.  Sharon O’Hara

Thanks for reading…Sharon O’Hara


COPD, Patients, Harrison’s Festival of Trees 2011 – a little story

Sunday, November 20th, 2011

What does COPD have to do with Harrison Medical Center’s 2011 Festival of Trees?  EVERYTHING.  Grateful patients, medical health providers and those who just plain like benefit auctions as an excuse to bid on wonderful and unusual items for a good cause donate and bid with full knowledge that their dollars will go for a good cause.

This year “Proceeds from the 2011 Festival of Trees will go to upgrades needed for rooms and equipment in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit) at Harrison Medical Center.”

http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/2011/oct/23/festival-of-trees-to-bough-out-after-25-years/

The following photos show a couple items donated by a person who has never donated items to the Festival of Trees before and shows real people behind each item.

One, the dollhouse, was bought as a dollhouse kit and put together by grandchildren and great-grandchildren as a family affair for Harrison Medical Center’s final 25th and final Festival of Trees.  Harrison Hospital is our community and family hospital.

One of the granddaughter’s is studying to become an RN in June, raising a family with her husband, also in the medical field.  The other granddaughter works for a local online wedding company, is part of a military family, her husband is a career submariner.

The rosemaled sled was originally in Vesterheim Heritage Museum’s 2008 benefit auction and sold then for $5,100.  Harrison has paired it with a very special Christmas tree.

 

Thanks for reading… Sharon O’Hara


Suquamish – Re: COPD – the beginning. Pain – the end.

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Thank you for taking the time to write, Suquamish – and you are young at only 52 to have COPD.  I’m sure there are other young ones with COPD who live to be retired and ancient without adding more diseases.  They keep moving as best they can, get good medical care, an exercise program and good nutrition too can overcome almost anything.

What does your doc say about the x-rays?

The pain is in my lower legs – not lungs and I’m one of those COPDers who gathered all these other medical conditions after COPD.

Venous Stasis Dermatitis – Lymphedema – Cellulitis – when I’m not careful enough about sodium and wearing support stockings.  This time though, thanks to Mellissa’s teaching and my husband’s help they didn’t swell, crack open and leak for about a year and a half.  The condition is chronic but I learned more good lessons to keep this from happening again through checking labels more carefully on everything I eat or drink.  Moreover, this too will pass – so will the pain.

The neat thing Suquamish – you gave me another idea.  You are young.  There have to be other people out there who would gladly give living with COPD and heart worthy tips to other COPDers.  Working full time, you probably aren’t able to attend the monthly afternoon Harrison Medical Center/Better Breathers educational classes at Harrison Silverdale.  However ….

Would you be interested in an evening support group of like-minded people who not only have lung or heart disease they are living life to the fullest in spite of it and want to share what has worked for them?

We should have such a support group in Silverdale. No gloom & doom – no cost – just patients sharing what works for us.

What do you think?  Would Tuesday evenings from 7 – 8 pm work for you?  Occasionally we could have speakers willing to donate their time to help educate us too.

Suquamish – Thanks for reading my posts and hope they haven’t been gloomy and doomy for you or anyone – I didn’t meant them to be.  This pain will pass when my lower legs get ‘normal’ again and I take proper care of them – including the support stockings and no more high sodium diet sodas.

I’m open to any suggestions for a meeting place that will allow COPDers (lung and heart folks) to meet on a monthly basis in the evening for an hour…

BTW:  I may be moaning and groaning about pain from my legs but it doesn’t change my plans to make a recumbent trike trip next summer from here to the other Washington for COPD.

Thanks… Sharon

One Response to “COPD – the beginning. Pain – the end”

  1. Suquamish Says:
    November 2nd, 2011 at 4:11 am

I am sorry Sharon, I guess I am following in your footsteps. The VA gave me a chest x-ray and it had a white spot on my lung. They told me to see my health provider (Group Death) I mean Group Health. They put a clip on my nipple to rule out the phantom shadow on the lung. Too bad the clip and the white spot both showed up in different areas. Group Health never diagnosed it at COPD. But a couple weeks ago when I went in Urgent care and underwent a breathing treatment the noted COPD in my health chart. I had another chest xray because of the pain you stated in your post. I guess it is just the muscles that got strained. I guess there weren’t any fractures or they would have been noted. I hope you take care of yourself Sharon, I enjoy reading your post on Kitsapsun.com. I would like to learn more about COPD from someone affected by it. I wonder how much longer I will be able to work. I am just a young guy at 52.
Read more: http://pugetsoundblogs.com/copd-and-other-stuff/2011/11/01/copd-the-beginning-pain-the-end/#ixzz1cbDldPN6

 


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About This Blog

This is a patient to patient blog to exchange information and resources...from COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) to Arthritis to Cellulites to Sarcoidosis to Sleep Apnea to RLS to Psoriasis to Support Groups to Caregivers and all points in between. Written by Sharon O'Hara.

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