Sorry For Problems; Fixes Coming Next Week

Our blog server has recently been overloaded by spammers. We expect to have
a fix in place in the next week. The comment function of Kitsap Sun blogs
will go on and off until then. We apologize for this inconvenience and ask
that you please be patient with us until that function is properly working
again.

2 thoughts on “Sorry For Problems; Fixes Coming Next Week

  1. The problem with the WSF is that neglect beyond all reason has set up an ugly process. It will take up to 6 years to replace the 6 ships currently appropriated.

    Even the six new ships will not be enough. At the start of this crises WSF had 16 out of 24 ship in drastic need of repair. Four of the 16 will never sail again due to cast frame cracks and skin plate corrosion.

    The typical lifetime of a ferry is 30 years and the last ships were built in the 1980’s. Ferries are not like other ships and are subject to a higher rate of corrosion than other types of ships.

    To make things more difficult the Puget Sound is subject to severe weather. These storms can come up suddenly and dramatically.

    Ferry capacity needs to expand in order to meet the needs of a rapidly growing population. More people are moving west to the islands and the peninsula.
    Land use regulation favors currently this direction.
    Property taxes also aid and abet this migration of population.

    The WSF does not seem to recognize that it is part of the road system. Fares are very high after several years of promoting the concept of users paying for 80% of operating costs. Do we pay for roads the same way?

    I hope some of these comments will be useful to the general public. I am attempting to lay out some basic principles to base ones thinking on?

  2. The problem with the WSF is that neglect beyond all reason has set up an ugly process. It will take up to 6 years to replace the 6 ships currently appropriated.
    Even the six new ships will not be enough. At the start of this crisis WSF had 16 out of 24 ships in drastic need of repair. Four of the 16 will never sail again due to cast frame cracks and skin plate corrosion.
    The typical lifetime of a ferry is 30 years and the last ships were built in the 1980’s. Ferries are not like other ships and are subject to a higher rate of corrosion than other types of ships.
    To make things more difficult the Puget Sound is subject to severe weather. These storms can come up suddenly and dramatically.
    Ferry capacity needs to expand in order to meet the needs of a rapidly growing population. More people are moving west to the islands and the peninsula.
    Land use regulation favors currently this direction.
    Property taxes also aid and abet this migration of population.
    The WSF does not seem to recognize that it is part of the road system. Fares are very high after several years of promoting the concept of users paying for 80% of operating costs. Do we pay for roads the same way?
    I hope some of these comments will be useful to the general public. I am attempting to lay out some basic principles to base one’s thinking on?

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