Category Archives: harvest 2018

Washingon’s Big Fruit Harvest

It’s been a bountiful harvest on the Kitsap Peninsula. Everywhere there are apple, pear and plum trees are bearing tons of fruit. In my yard, the three apple trees, Italian plum and two walnut trees are keeping me pretty busy. The race began in earnest the end of August, picking blackberries before the heat of the day.

Next on the to do list were apples. I froze them, thawed them and then pressed them for some of the sweetest cider I’ve ever tasted. Then I fermented 5 gallons of cider, baked couple of apple cakes, cooked up a dozen jars of apple sauce and when I ran out of jars, sliced over 30 pounds of apples and dried them. It’s a great snack, especially when accompanied with a thin slice of cheddar and a glass of Riesling.

The plums were plentiful too. They accompanied me to every meeting I went to. Out of town guests were sent packing with a bag of plums and apples. Plum tarts, plum wine and jars of spicy plum sauce now occupy my kitchen. I will trade a plum tart for a bottle of wine.

In my spare time, I helped out with crush at a few Bainbridge Island wineries. At Perennial Vintners last month, bottling was the order of the day. Because that’s what you have to do in a small winery to make room for the coming harvest. There is only so much room for a limited amount of tanks.

And this time of year, tanks are needed. Whites are bottled and reds go into barrels. At Perennial, the wine was pumped from the tanks into a smaller container about the size of an aquarium with six spigots. Next, bottles were gassed and then filled, corked and labeled by a crew of volunteers under the direction of owner/winemaker Mike Lempriere. He’ll be harvesting Müller -Thurgau from the Puget Sound AVA soon.

At Eleven Winery, owner/winemaker Matt Albee crushed Elephant Mountain Syrah and Viognier in mid-September and then Tempranillo. This week, the Lemberger is scheduled to arrive. Wine grapes arrive in big tubs called lugs. The lugs are so full of grapes, they’re moved around with a fork lift.

Albee had devised a system to tilt the tub with the fork lift so one volunteer can rake the grapes onto the moving conveyor line where two volunteers remove leaves, bugs and dried grapes. As the grape bunches reach the top of the conveyor, they fall into the crusher/destemmer. Stems fall into one lug and crushed berries fall into another.

When crushing is finished, the lugs are moved into the winery, treated with SO2 and covered with a cloth sheet to allow the sulfites to do their job of killing wild yeasts before off-gassing for 24 hours. After that, the yeast culture is added and voila! Fermentation begins.

Belfair’s Mosquito Fleet Winery has a similar setup however, their sorting tables are manned by at least a dozen enthusiastic volunteers who pick out the dried berries, leaves and other debris that are not Petite Verdot and Malbec grapes. It’s a convivial event with owners Brian and Jacquie Petersen and Scott and Jacy Griffin; lunch and, of course, tastes of award winning wines. Small wineries welcome and take very good care of their volunteers.

With anticipation and apprehension, winemakers keep tabs on their vines and weather at harvest time. It’s the age old winemaker question, when should picking begin? The answer, my wine friends, is blowing in the wind and different for each grape variety. Some are early ripeners, like Syrah and some are late ripeners, like Cabernet.

At an estimated 268,000 tons, the 2018 harvest in Washington is likely to be bigger than last year but not as big as 2016. That year holds the record for grape harvest at 270,000 tons. In contrast, Oregon’s harvest is estimated around 85,000 tons, on par with their 2015 record crop. And in British Columbia, harvest was at an all-time high of 32,700 tons.

A staggering two-thirds of Washington’s grape harvest is handled by Ste. Michelle Wine Estates, which includes brands such as Columbia Crest, North Star, Intrinsic, Col Solare, Seven Falls, 14 Hands, and, of course, Ste. Michelle.

Much of the growth is due to 58,200 acres of new vineyards that have matured. Most of these plantings are in established AVAs. But hold on to your hat – five new AVAs are on the docket. Applications for Goose Gap, Royal Slope, The Burn, White Bluffs and Candy Mountains have been filed.

It’s a busy time of year in but somehow the Yakima Valley wineries manage to harvest, crush and celebrate. They invite you to celebrate their bountiful harvest during the  Annual Catch the Crush on October 13th and 14th. Each winery offers its own celebratory activities such as grape stomps, crush activities, tours, free-run juice, hors d’oeuvres, live music, and of course, wine tasting.

If you purchase a Catch the Crush Premier Pass, you’ll enjoy exclusive food pairings, library tastings and tours. Wineries ask you to bring your own glass, photo ID and designated driver for this annual wine adventure. Cheers!

Producers to Savor during Harvest 2018

Bottling has been the major activity in many wineries these past few months, an annual pre-harvest must. Preparation for bottling or crushing usually takes more time than the actual bottling or crushing. It all has to do with keeping everything — vessels, hands, filters, bottles, corks and hoses — that comes in contact with the wine clean.

California’s harvest began two weeks ago with sparkling wine producers who always pick early for slightly under-ripe grapes. in 2017, over 4,000 wineries crushed 4 million tons of wine grapes. Oregon has also had several banner years. Its 474 wineries had 84,949 tons of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and other grapes to ferment, rack, age and bottle.

Washington state’s wine grape harvest is shaping up to be bigger than 2016’s record-breaking harvest of 270,000 tons. More than 940 wineries harvested 227,000 tons in 2017.

A ton of wine will typically produce 768 bottles of wine. And, 270,000 tons equals almost 5 million bottles of Washington wine. An average American drinks 18 bottles a year. Fortunately, American wines are enjoyed by our friends Downunder, in Europe, Japan, China and Canada to name a few countries.

Here are some wines, in no particular order, recently tasted. Going through my notes, I’ve picked out wines that I found particularly delightful. Some are still available, others you’ll just have to get the newer vintage.

Beaucastel Chateau Neuf du Pape 2004 was on the bottom of the cellar and was out of sight for 10 years. It needed to be drunk now, I thought. But when I pulled the cork, aromas of cinnamon and Asian spices filled the air. And it was a gorgeous ruby color without a touch of orange. A beautiful wine with a lamb chop.

And another from the cellar, Roberto Voerzio Vigna Serra 1990, vino da tavola della Lange, da una Nebbiolo e Barbera. The Nebbiolo Barbera blend was earthy and plummy with wonderful aromas. The critics say he makes age-worthy Barolos. This wine was beautiful at 18 years old.

Luigi Righetti 1990 Capiteldella Roari Amarone della Valpolicella Classico is produced from Corvina, Molinara, and Rondinella. After harvest, the grapes are dried on wooden racks for five months before they are pressed and then aged in oak barrels. On the back label, I was informed that in 1990, Righetti produced 28,000 bottles of this Amarone. I thoroughly enjoyed No. 24081 with friends.

Child’s Play Columbia Valley 2015 Zinfandel was made by Tendril Wine Cellars owner and winemaker Tony Rynders. This had a fantastic balance. Not a huge, jammy, high-alcohol type Zin but more in the early California style of a claret. The fruit and acidity balances the 14.2 percent ABV.

Cairdeas Winery Diffraction 2016 Yakima Valley is a blend of 37 percent Syrah, 20 percent Grenache, and 17 percent Petite Sirah. The remainder is other traditional Rhone grapes: Mourvedre, Cinsault and Carignan. This one had earthy, chocolate, spice and plum aromas and flavors with Asian spices on a long finish.

The Chehalem Willamette Valley Three Vineyard 2016 Pinot Gris also has fantastic balance. This certified sustainable winery in Newberg produced this wine in the French style, meaning it is not fruit-forward like a Pinot Grigio but rich with peach, lemon peel and spice. Like a Pinot Gris from Alsace, this wine is in a bottle similar to Riesling.

Another great find this year was a bottle of Greystone 2014 California Petite Sirah.  This wine caught my attention when I read Greystone and Petite Sirah. The back label said “cellared and bottled by Greystone Cellars.” Notice it didn’t say “produced by.” Only cellared and bottled. My guess is a negotiator bought some juice, made the wine and Greystone Cellars took it from there.

Greystone is this massive building built by a businessman to house the Christian Brothers winery and to store wines from other wineries. When it was built in 1889, it was the largest stone winery in the world. Its cavernous tunnels held 3 million gallons of aging wine. Today, the building houses the Culinary Institute of America, which owns the building and the name.

Joe to go Oregon Rosé wine is made in Oregon and is really good wine. Back label states that it’s Oregon Grapes, fermented in stainless steel, produced and packed (in a can) by Wine by Joe, Napa, California.

Vinted and canned by Canned Oregon is a non-vintage Oregon Pink Rosé Bubbles that bursts with red berries, apples and a bit of spritz to make it refreshing. This is the ticket at the beach or after the long hike up the mountain.

Canned Oregon hails from Dayton, Oregon, the heart of the Yamhill Carlton AVA. In this AVA are such heavyweights as Ken Wright Cellars, Lemelson Vineyards, Carlton Cellars, Soter Vineyards, Elk Cove Vineyards and Tendril Wine Cellars.