Wine with Quiche

You’ve probably read somewhere about egg dishes and wine being a tough match.

But if you look at eggs as a vehicle for other wine friendly ingredients, therein lies the key to matching egg dishes with egg friendly wines.

Another good rule to remember: Keep the tannin level to a minimum and the fruit level balanced.

Cheese and wine have such a natural affinity and so does wine with meats and most vegetables. With Ann Vogel’s quiche recipes, we’ll focus on pairing with the turkey, broccoli and Swiss cheese; ham, cheddar, and onions; or brussel sprouts, crispy bacon, and smoky cheese.

The first wine that comes to mind is from an area in France that cooks up some of the best dishes in all of France. Alsace is in the north east corner of France. Because this region borders Germany and those borders have moved several times, the wines have a strong Germanic influence. For the most part, the wines are made from white grapes, much like in Germany and the grape names are listed on the label, unusual for a French wine.

The Pinot Blanc grape is a wonderful alternative to Chardonnay. The way it’s fermented here produces a similar medium to full-bodied style of wine with good acidity even though it is aged in stainless-steel tanks.

Pierre Sparr 2011 Pinot Blanc is traditionally made with no skin contact and no malolactic fermentation but it does spend 6 months on the lees. The resulting effort is medium bodied with aromas of pears and lemon peel with flavors of sweet pear, spice and minerals balanced by crisp acidity. The alcohol is low at 12% and this delightful wine ranges between $12 and $15.

Another unusual but splendid pairing would be a Beaujolais made from the Gamay grape. Yep, it’s a red wine and this is an egg dish, but trust me, it works! And the reason is the wine has wonderful fruit and very low tannins.

There are two distinct types of Beaujolais, Cru and Nouveau. Cru Beaujolais are from a specific commune in Beaujolais such as Morgon, Fleurie, or Bouilly. Cru Beaujolais can be aged, although for a shorter period. These are elegant, medium bodied reds with black fruits flavors and an affinity to smoked meats and cheeses.

The 3rd Thursday in November is when Beaujolais Nouveau is released. This style of Beaujolais is very fruity due to the way it’s produced. It’s the fastest wine on the planet, taking only two months from vineyard to your glass. You can expect a fruit bowl on the nose and palate and a smooth finish. This is a red wine with training wheels.

The two biggest producers of Beaujolais Nouveau are DuBoeuf and Drohin. Both sell for around $15. For a Cru Beaujolais producer, look for Château Thivin or Hubert LaPierre for about $15 apiece.