A chardonnay to celebrate your chanterelle harvest

After the blue skies and hot weather here last week, it’s easy to forget about the deluge of heavy rain we had the first week of September.

But if you’re a mushroom hunter, or a chanterelle mushroom lover, you’re probably thanking Mother Nature because that rain resulted in a healthy crop of chanterelles ripe for picking.

These meaty, funnel shaped fungi range in odor and flavor. Different species boast different profiles including fruity, woody or earthy and even peppery or spicy.

The common denominator among all species though is the mushroom’s chemistry that makes it the perfect food to saute in butter or oil, as recommended in Ann Vogel’s two chanterelle recipes. Because they contain smaller amounts of water, the mushrooms pick up flavors imparted by wine if you choose to use it when cooking — also recommended in one of Vogel’s recipes.

Her sauteed recipe calls for using 1/4 cup of dry white wine. We suggest you buy a bottle of dry white wine to drink alongside both dishes.

If you regularly read this column, or the Cheers to You blog where we write about wine every week, you should know by now we’re chardonnay lovers. And seeing that chardonnay is a dry white wine, we highly recommend you cook your chanterelles with chardonnay and pour the rest of the bottle into your glass to sip while you enjoy the fruits of your labor.

California’s J. Lohr Vineyards and Winery has a reasonably priced chardonnay that would match the earthiness of Vogel’s sauteed chanterelles and the richness of her chanterelle and crab pasta.

The 2011 Estates Riverstone Chardonnay comes from the Arroyo Seco Appellation in California’s Monterey County. The wine has a full mouth feel that balances a toasted oak finish with tropical notes and stone fruit flavors. The weight of the wine will go well with the rich flavors of the chanterelles.

The wine is easily found at most grocery stores and retails at $14, but is often offered on discount closer to $10 to $12.