Tag Archives: photography

Chilling images

Turnout for this year’s Chilly Hilly was lighter than in years past, but who can blame those that decided to sit this one out?

There was freezing wind, plenty of rain and even some snow. And, as always, there were a lot of hills.

You can read Chris Dunagan’s story on the event here (with photos by Jesse Beals).

Also, check out island photographer Jay Trinidad’s blog for a dozens of shots he took while sitting on the back of a motorcycle.

Exhibit: Port Blakely graffiti artists’ ever-changing canvas

spraypaintblakelybanner1

This week is your last chance to see island photographer Philip Meadow’s Port Blakely mill exhibit at Cafe Trios.

Meadows, a transplant from the U.K., was quite taken by the ever-changing canvas that the old lumber mill building has become. For years, graffiti artists have created overlapping images on the walls, ceiling and floor of the crumbling concrete structure at the center of Port Blakely Park.

Meadows’ exhibit features huge images and 360 degree panorama shots of the artwork spraypainted on the building’s interior.

He’s looking for a new place to show the exhibit. You can reach him here, and check out his online gallery (here) and blog (here).

Here’s what Meadows had to say about the exhibit in a recent post:

The mill was shut down in 1922 and over time, the mill’s buildings were destroyed. All that remains of Port Blakely mill today is the old generator building which has become a canvas for graffiti artists and a playground for BMX and skateboard riders. Although some people may find these activities to be somewhat unfitting use for such a piece of history, it has to be said that the young people that are attracted to this location remain respectful in their own way.

Philip Meadows, self-portrait
Philip Meadows, self-portrait

Your commute…only prettier

Bainbridge ferry commuter Michael Diehl doesn’t take his cross Sound commute for granted.

With his camera at the ready, Diehl has focused his attention on what makes the ferry ride to and from Seattle a world-class visual experience. Sunsets rippling on waves, fog-shrouded skyscrapers, glimmering mountains.

Diehl has compiled his best shots into Crossings,” a photo-rich book focused entirely on the Bainbridge-Seattle run.

What Diehl has captured is the what many ferry commuters forget to appreciate. I know I did when I was a ferry commuter. Too often the ride is a taken up by naps, newspaper reading (although that is a very, very worthwhile thing to do), eating, napping, coffee drinking, napping and laptop tapping. We get plenty of this at work and at home. Lost is an opportunity to become familiar with the landscape, getting to know the mountain peaks and the swaths of land that many can identify on a map, but not when it’s right before our eyes.

For more about “Crossings,” read Barbara McMichael’s review and see a sample page below.

Bookmonger: Crossings Celebrates Our Affair with Ferries
By Barbara McMichael

Born and raised locally, I have had a lifelong fondness for ferries, and I have always regarded with suspicion those ferry commuters who seem to be blasé about their daily transits across Puget Sound.

To have those mountains! Those shorelines! The wind in your face! The ever-changing scene in the shipping lanes! The possibility of an orca sighting!

Why some people prefer to huddle inside and do a crossword puzzle or nap is entirely beyond me.
Crossings: On the Ferries of Puget Sound.

Fortunately, Michael Diehl is not one of those ho-hum types. A regular commuter on the Bainbridge Island-Seattle run, Diehl carries his camera with him, and the images he’s captured over the last few years first made their appearance as an Internet posting.

Continue reading