Tag Archives: Asani

VIDEO: Big green development taking shape in Winslow

King 5 News has a story about Grow Community, a large housing development set to take shape along Wyatt Way and Grow Avenue.

It’s aim is to be fully solar powered and to foster an earth-friendly lifestyle that’s oriented toward walking, cycling and growing food.

I had a story about it earlier this month, which you can read here.

Unlike most big developments on Bainbridge, Grow Community has drawn little criticism (so far). At a recent public meeting, most of the concerns were about traffic impacts. The development’s designers gave assurances that they’d actually be improving the area’s transportation infrastructure by adding sidewalks and bike lanes along Wyatt and Grow.

Grow Community will begin building an eventual 137 homes in May.

It’s big, it’s green and it’s headed to Winslow

The largest housing development since Harbor Square is expected to break ground on the north end of Winslow by the middle of next year.

Planned for the eight acres to the west of the Pavilion, the 138-unit Grow Community aims to be a walkable, energy-efficient neighborhood with a mix of housing types.

“We’re hoping to create a community that doesn’t yet exist,” said Marja Preston, a planner for Asani, the company that’s developing the site. “The idea is to create opportunities for more community interaction through diverse housing and amenities on the site.”

Grow Community’s preliminary site plan calls for condominiums, townhouses, rental apartments and single-family homes set along a wide central trail. Asani plans to incorporate pea-patches, composting areas, rain gardens and a community hall.

Read my story HERE.

Asani’s preliminary site plan can be seen below.

Back when she was a Bainbridge city planner, Preston worked to get the site listed as pilot project with Forest Trends’ Business and Biodiversity Offset Program, which aims to strike a balance between large-scale resource use and environmental preservation.

In a story I wrote for the Review in 2007, the plan was generally panned by other conservationists who were brought to Bainbridge for a Forest Trends conference. The project site was seen as too small to have a significant impact, said conservationists who were leading biodiversity offset projects in Africa that benefit endangered animals and fragile forests.

Though smaller in scale, the project shouldn’t be discounted, a South African scientist said.

Don’t call it a biodiversity offset, he said. Call it sound urban planning.

It looks like that’s what Preston is aiming for, albeit now through the private sector rather than City Hall.

Grow Community Map